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Vegetarian starts eating meat again, takes 40-minutes off her triathlon bike time


Written By: Eric Anderson, Feb 03, 2016
Canada's fitness information leaderKathleen Trotter – took 40 minutes off her triathlon bike time when she started eating meat, after being a vegetarian for 18-years. So, she was already in great shape to complete a triathlon, then eating meat gave her an extra boost.

Kathleen revealed this during a CTV Morning Live Atlantic interview on February 1st.



Kathleen often states "knowledge is power" and during the interview she passed along that "protein is the building block of muscle."

On a side note, the more muscle you carry the more calories you burn while doing nothing.
Back to the interview.

Kathleen stated that when trying to lose weight it can be helpful to pick protein sources that are nutrient dense, are a complete protein, and come at a low caloric cost. Beef is a great nutrient dense and unprocessed option. During the interview she demonstrated that you only need to consume 180 calories of beef to get the same amount of protein as you would from 550 calories of humus, or 700 calories of peanut butter, black beans, or even quinoa (pronounced keen-wah).

Another way of looking at that would be, to get the same amount of protein, you need only eat a fraction of the calories by consuming beef. Think of it as the "caloric cost" of the protein your are acquiring.

Kathleen also noted that the sugar craving you may get at 3:00 pm, may be due to a lack of protein at lunch.

And, if all the details is confusing, just remember that a seasoned triathlete took 40-minutes off her bike time when she started eating meat after being a vegetarian for 18-years.

If you want to learn more, go to #beefadvantage or here
 
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Major U.S. firms support Canada in meat battle


Written By: Eric Anderson, Dec 10, 2015
10 Dec 2015
ALEXANDER PANETTA THE CANADIAN PRESS

U.S. firms support Canada in meat battle

WASHINGTON Canada is getting the backing of considerable American corporate muscle at a determining moment in an ongoing trade struggle with the United States Congress.
About 250 U.S. companies and trade associations have sent a letter to every member of the U.S. Senate, urging them to heed Canadian and Mexican concerns over meat-labelling rules.
This comes after the World Trade Organization sided with Canada and Mexico in the dispute, opening the door to the imminent imposition of tariffs on American goods including meat, wine, and frozen orange juice.
The letter warns that the U.S. will face US$1 billion in tariffs on a wide range of products unless the chamber does away with a requirement that meat on American grocery shelves be labelled by its country of origin.
It’s signed by some of the country’s best-known companies, including Coca-Cola, Kraft and General Mills, as well as trade associations representing everything from livestock-producers to vineyards.
“There’s a lot of powerful U.S. paddlers joining Canada in this canoe to get repeal of COOL (country-of-origin labelling),” Gary Doer, Canada’s U.S. ambassador, said of the letter.
After a years-long dispute, the issue could be decided by the holidays.
Proponents of meat-labelling call it a fair system for letting consumers know where their food comes from. Opponents say it does nothing for food safety — for which there are already inspections.
They argue that it’s just disguised protectionism — a system that forces importers to spend extra money to separate foreign and domestic livestock, drives up the cost of imports and makes them less competitive.
The World Trade Organization has sided against the U.S., allowing penalties on American products.
Now the letter-signers want the Senate to adopt a bill passed in the House of Representatives that does away with the requirement that meat sold in the U.S. be labelled by country of origin.
 
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WHO clarifies on links between meat and cancer


Written By: Eric Anderson, Nov 05, 2015
In their update, the WHO states that the latest IARC review does not ask people to stop eating processed meats but instead "indicates that reducing consumption of these products can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer." 
From http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/statements/2015/processed-meat-cancer/en/
_________________
 

Links between processed meat and colorectal cancer

WHO statement
29 October 2015

WHO has received a number of queries, expressions of concern and requests for clarification following the publication of a report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) relating to processed meat and colorectal cancer.
IARC was established 50 years ago through a resolution of the World Health Assembly as a functionally independent cancer agency under the auspices of WHO. Its programme of work is approved and financed by its participating states.
IARC’s review confirms the recommendation in WHO’s 2002 “Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases report, which advised people to moderate consumption of preserved meat to reduce the risk of cancer. The latest IARC review does not ask people to stop eating processed meats but indicates that reducing consumption of these products can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.
WHO has a standing group of experts who regularly evaluate the links between diet and disease. Early next year they will meet to begin looking at the public health implications of the latest science and the place of processed meat and red meat within the context of an overall healthy diet.
For more information, please contact:

Gregory Härtl
WHO Spokesperson
Mobile: +41 79 203 6715
Email: hartlg@who.int
 
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Posted in Livestock | Tagged with WHO cancer red meat beef IARC | More articles by Eric Anderson

Cancer 'hazard' not a cancer 'risk', meat industry cautions


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 27, 2015
From Ag Canada

A new report classifying processed meats such as hot dogs and bacon as “carcinogenic” to humans doesn’t set out a cause-and-effect link between meats and cancer, industry groups caution.
The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a research arm of the World Health Organization, on Monday published a report placing processed meats in its Group 1 category, which includes substances such as tobacco and asbestos with “sufficient evidence” of links to cancer.
The IARC on Monday also put red meat, such as beef, pork and lamb, in its Group 2A — where glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide, was recently also classified as a “probable” carcinogen. (The IARC’s Group 2B, of “possible” carcinogens, recently saw 2,4-D herbicide added to the list.)
In its response Monday to the report, the Canadian Meat Council emphasized that the IARC defines an agent that “may cause cancer at some level, under some circumstance,” as a “cancer hazard.”
However, the CMC said, actual “cancer risk” gauges the likelihood of experiencing cancer after being exposed to a “cancer hazard,” and the IARC identifies such hazards even when the risks are “very low.”
Such findings aren’t unusual for the IARC, the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association said in a separate release, saying the agency “has found hazards in about half of the agents it has reviewed.”
For its 2A classification for red meat, the CCA said, the IARC’s review of existing epidemiological studies “concluded that there is limited evidence in human beings for the carcinogenicity of the consumption of red meat,” and “no clear association was seen in several of the high quality studies and residual confounding from other diet and lifestyle risk is difficult to exclude.”
Colorectal cancer was the IARC report’s “principal focus” relative to red meat, the CCA said. The report had cited 10 cohort studies with a “statistically significant dose–response relationship,” with a 17 per cent increased risk per 100 grams per day of red meat.
Given that the American Society of Clinical Oncology (has estimated a person with an “average” risk of colorectal cancer has about a five per cent chance of developing colorectal cancer overall, consuming 100 g per day of red meat would increase the risk of colorectal cancer by just under one per cent in absolute terms, the CCA said.
The meat industry has previously estimated Canadians, on average, eat only about 50 g of fresh red meat per day. Thus, the CCA said, “if there is an increase in the potential risk of colorectal cancer from red meat consumption, by these estimates it is small and must be considered relative to the very significant nutritional benefits that red meat provides.”
“It is regrettable that, in arriving at its split decision, the IARC panel reportedly chose to disregard certain studies which present high quality evidence to the contrary,” CMC president Joe Reda said.
“Furthermore, the agency did not balance its verdict by taking into account either the proven benefits of meat or the substantive implications of removing meat from the diet… Risks and benefits should both be considered before recommending what people eat and drink.” — AGCanada.com Network
 
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Posted in Livestock | Tagged with livestock beef cancer IARC | More articles by Eric Anderson

Five questions about the WHO's cancer-causing meat announcement answered


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 26, 2015
Five questions about the WHO’s cancer-causing meat announcement answered 
 
Carly Weeks
 
The Globe and Mail
 
Published Monday, Oct. 26, 2015 2:10PM EDT
 
Last updated Monday, Oct. 26, 2015 2:37PM EDT
 
 
 
Bacon causes cancer and a New York strip steak probably does too. On Monday, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer announced that processed meat is carcinogenic and that red meat, including beef, veal, pork and lamb, probably causes cancer. The announcement has many rethinking what they eat and whether they can ever enjoy a guilt-free hot dog or hamburger again. It’s critical to look beyond the headlines to answer those questions.
 
What happened?
 
The IARC decided to study processed and red meat on the advice of an international advisory committee that highlighted the mounting evidence linking both to cancer. This month, 22 scientists from 10 countries met in Lyon, France, to figure out once and for all what those risks are.
 
The group looked at more than 800 studies from around the globe. The relationship between meat and colorectal cancer was the most widely studied. In their assessment, the researchers gave the most weight to prospective studies – ones that followed a group of participants for a period of time to track their health outcomes.
 
After reviewing all of the information, the working group concluded that there is enough evidence to classify processed meat as carcinogenic. Processed meat refers to meat that has been cured, smoked, salted or otherwise processed to increase flavour and shelf life: anything from bacon to ham to lunch meat to pepperoni.
 
Specifically, the group ruled that processed meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer. A person who consumes 50 grams of processed meat a day (roughly equivalent to a hot dog, two pieces of bacon or a few slices of smoked turkey) has an 18 per cent increased risk of developing that type of cancer.
 
The story was slightly different with red meat. The working group found that while there is evidence that red-meat consumption raises the risk of colorectal cancer, the currently available data are not sufficient to definitively declare red meat as carcinogenic. The group also pointed out that some studies have found that red meat may increase the incidence of pancreatic and prostate cancer.
 
Although red meat, such as beef, pork and lamb, contains important vitamins and nutrients, the IARC said consumption leads to the formation of N-nitroso compounds, which are carcinogenic, in the colon. Cooking meat can also produce certain carcinogenic chemicals.
 
More study is needed to figure out the exact underpinnings of the relationship between meat and cancer, but enough evidence is in to determine that it is a risk.
 
Does this mean processed meat carries the same risk as tobacco?
 
It is incorrect and misleading to equate the dangers of smoking and processed meat. What they now have in common is that they are both in Group 1, IARC’s list of known carcinogens. Group 1 carcinogens are those for which the evidence clearly shows that they cause cancer. Red meat belongs to Group 2A because there is limited evidence that it probably causes cancer.
 
The risks associated with tobacco products are much greater than processed meat, however. The Global Burden of Disease Project estimates that 34,000 people die of cancer every year as a result of consuming processed meat. Compare that with the more than one million people who die from cancer worldwide annually as a result of tobacco. Not to mention the millions of others who die as a result of tobacco-induced respiratory diseases, heart disease and other problems.
 
So now do I have to break up with bacon and steak?
 
Not necessarily. Declaring that something is carcinogenic lets people know that it poses a risk. It doesn’t mean we should banish the item in question. As the American Cancer Society points out, there are plenty of cancer-causing substances that are unavoidable, such as radiation, to which we are exposed through the soil as well as X-rays and other medical procedures, as well as estrogen, which occurs naturally in the human body.
 
Another known carcinogen on the IARC’s Group 1 list? Wood dust. Of course, that doesn’t mean anyone who has ever walked through a lumberyard or endured a major home renovation is going to develop a disease as a result.
 
The key is finding a balance of how to manage potential risks, says Sian Bevan, director of research at the Canadian Cancer Society. “It’s important to remember it’s a relative risk,” she said. “An individual’s personal risk [for colorectal cancer] is already relatively low.”
 
Cancer Research UK, a London-based charity, crunched the numbers to provide some much-needed perspective. According to the organization, 61 out of every 1,000 people in the United Kingdom will develop colorectal cancer during their lives. For those that eat the least amount of processed meat, that number is 56 out of 1,000. Using the results of a study conducted in 2011 by the World Cancer Research Fund, the rate for people who consumed the highest amount of processed meat is 66 out of 1,000. In other words, eating a diet rich in bacon, ham, salami and other processed meats does pose a higher risk, but it isn’t the equivalent of a cancer diagnosis.
 
What about “natural” processed meats?
 
You’ve probably seen a new crop of hot dogs and bacon in your grocery store with the word “natural” emblazoned on the packaging. According to the labels, those types of products are made using such easy-to-pronounce ingredients as sea salt, vinegar and cultured celery extract. However, that doesn’t mean those products have a lower cancer risk or are otherwise healthier. The “natural” preservatives are still a source of nitrates and nitrites, compounds that have been linked to an increased cancer risk.
 
Cancer isn’t the only concern
 
Keep in mind that cancer is just one negative health outcome. Choosing salty, fatty, highly processed meat products can also raise the risk of high blood pressure, obesity, cardiovascular disease and a host of other health issues.
 
That’s why groups such as the Canadian Cancer Society are preaching moderation – sure, you can enjoy a nice steak dinner, but don’t forget about fruits, vegetables, fish and grains.
 
So what might a moderate balanced diet look like? The society recommends people limit their consumption of red meat to three times a week and to reserve processed meat for special occasions.
 
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Posted in Livestock | Tagged with WHO cancer red meat beef IARC | More articles by Eric Anderson

SK PRODUCERS REMINDED TO VACCINATE AFTER ANTHRAX CONFIRMED IN CATTLE


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 29, 2015

The Gov't of SK released tofay that . . .

The Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture is reminding producers to vaccinate their livestock following confirmation that anthrax has been found in cattle in the RM of Harris.  Anthrax was confirmed by laboratory results on July 28, 2015, as the cause of death in one cow and is the suspected cause of death of two other cattle on the same farm.  This is the second report of anthrax in Saskatchewan this year.  Alberta reported a case in cattle in the Fort Vermillion area this week.

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Posted in Livestock | Tagged with anthrax Saskatchewan cattle vaccination | More articles by Eric Anderson

Brazil looking to open Canadian fresh beef market


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 27, 2015

Reuters is reporting that . . . .

Brazil is working on a deal to open the Canadian market for fresh beef in the second half of 2015 and is in the final phase of opening the Saudi Arabian market, the agriculture ministry’s secretary of international relations said on Monday.

Brazil also expects a final deal to export beef to Japan by December, secretary Tatiana Palermo said. Brazil has recently clinched agreements to export fresh beef to China and the United States, overcoming mad cow concerns in 2012.

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Ukraine opens to more Canadian beef imports


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 22, 2015

Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and International Trade Minister Ed Fast have announced the Ukrainian market has opened for beef from cattle under 30 months of age and ready-to-eat meat.

In 2014 Ukraine lifted a ban on imports of other Canadian beef products imposed after Canada reported a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in 2003.

Ukraine’s global imports of beef products in 2014 were $17.1 million

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Tax deferral sought on breeding stock


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 22, 2015

The Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association (SSGA) is asking the federal government to allow drought-stricken ranchers to defer taxes on livestock they have been forced to sell due to dry conditions.

The tax deferral helps producers retain some of the cash required to rebuild their herds when drought conditions abate.

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Cattle prices up


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 20, 2015

From http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/MarketTrends

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Beef price upswing snaps skid for live cattle


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 14, 2015

Reuters is reporting that  . . .

For the first time in five sessions Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle futures landed in positive territory on Tuesday, helped by the turnaround in wholesale beef values, traders said.

August closed 0.55 cent/lb. higher at 147.15 cents, and October up 0.6 cent to 150.325 cents (all figures US$).

Tuesday morning’s wholesale choice beef price (cutout) gained 63 cents/cwt from Monday to $236.63. Select cuts rose $1.58, to $234.28, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said.

Full story at http://www.agcanada.com/daily/u-s-livestock-beef-price-upswing-snaps-skid-for-live-cattle

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90,000 ACRES OF CONSERVATION LAND MADE AVAILABLE TO CATTLE PRODUCERS FOR GRAZING


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 14, 2015

 

90,000 ACRES OF CONSERVATION LAND MADE AVAILABLE TO CATTLE PRODUCERS FOR GRAZING

 

 

Released on July 14, 2015
 
Today Environment Minister Herb Cox and Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart announced that approximately 90,000 acres of Fish and Wildlife Development Fund (FWDF) land will be made available to cattle producers facing dry conditions.
 
“We recognize the challenges that dry conditions have created for some cattle producers and are pleased to make this land available for grazing,” Cox said.  “It will offer significant acres for cattle producers, and revenue generated as a result of this initiative will help fund future conservation initiatives.”
 
“We appreciate the Ministry of Environment making these lands available,” Stewart said.  “The extremely dry conditions of this spring and summer have left many cattle producers searching for additional pasture.  This grassland will help producers who are facing a shortage of feed for their cattle.”
 
The Fish and Wildlife Development Fund land, located throughout the province, are for the most part native prairie or other grasslands and are typically used for conservation purposes.  The land, which was purchased through the Fish and Wildlife Development Fund, was also made available to producers in 2009.  While some of the available land has water sources and is fenced, much of the land will require temporary fencing or water.  Producers who are awarded access to FWDF lands are responsible for the cost and construction of any necessary improvements.
 
The same grazing lease fees that apply to agricultural Crown land will apply to the FWDF land.  The land will be made available on a first come, first served basis.  A list of available lands by rural municipality will be available on the Ministry of Environment’s website and at local offices.  Producers who are interested in securing the land should contact their local Ministry of Environment office as to availability, stocking rates and any unique conditions that may apply.
 
For more information, producers can contact their local Ministry of Environment office, visit www.environment.gov.sk.ca or call 1-800-567-42241-800-567-4224 FREE.
 
-30-
 
For more information, contact:
 
Michele McEachern
Environment
Regina
Phone: 306-787-0412306-787-0412
Email: michele.mceachern@gov.sk.ca
 
Sarah Hein
Agriculture
Regina
Phone: 306-787-5389306-787-5389
Email: sarah.hein@gov.sk.ca
Cell: 306-527-9102306-527-9102 - See more at: http://www.flaman.com/blog.php#sthash.kcnaPvLg.dpuf
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ANTHRAX CONFIRMED IN BISON IN NORTHWEST SASKATCHEWAN


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 09, 2015

The Gov't of SK released:

Saskatchewan Agriculture is reminding producers to be on the lookout for anthrax in their animals after confirmation that anthrax has been found in bison northwest of North Battleford.  Anthrax was confirmed by laboratory results July 8 as the cause of death in two bison, and is the suspected cause of seven other deaths.

Anthrax is caused by the bacteria Bacillus anthracis, which can survive in spore form for decades in soil.  Changes in soil moisture, from flooding and drying, can lead to a build-up of the spores on pastures.  Spores can concentrate in sloughs and potholes, and risk of animal exposure to anthrax increases in drier years when these areas dry up and become accessible.  Spores can also surface when the ground is excavated or when there is excessive run-off. 

Livestock are infected when they eat forage contaminated with spores.  Ruminants such as bison, cattle, sheep and goats, are highly susceptible, and horses can also be infected.  Swine, birds and carnivores are more resistant to infection, but farm dogs and cats should be kept away from carcasses. 

Affected animals are usually found dead without any signs of illness.  Anthrax can be prevented by vaccination.   Producers in regions that have experienced previous outbreaks are strongly encouraged to vaccinate their animals each year.  If your neighbours have anthrax, you should consider vaccination to protect your animals.

The carcasses of any animal suspected of having anthrax should not be moved or disturbed, and should be protected from scavengers such as coyotes or ravens, to prevent spreading spores in the environment.

Anyone who suspects anthrax should contact their local veterinarian immediately for diagnosis. All tests must be confirmed by a laboratory diagnosis.  All positive test results must be immediately reported to the provincial Chief Veterinary Officer.

Producers are advised to use caution when handling potentially infected animals or carcasses.  Animal cases pose minimal risk to humans but people can get infected through direct contact with sick animals or carcasses.  In cases where people believe they have been exposed to an infected animal, they should contact their local health authority or physician for advice.

 

Full story at https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2015/july/09/anthrax-in-northwest-sask

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Cattle herds not expanding even with high prices


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 09, 2015

CNS is reporting that "Expansion efforts in Canada’s cattle sector are likely taking a breather right now, as a lack of rain in Alberta and Saskatchewan creates challenges for ranchers trying to feed their animals."

Also, "If rain doesn’t come soon, she said, yearling cattle could also be going on feed in July, instead of August and September."

According to numbers from Canfax, Canadian cattle inventories on Jan. 1, 2015 were down 2.5 per cent on the year at 11.9 million head, the smallest such level since 1993.

In contrast, the U.S. cattle herd has been on the upswing, with inventories rising 1.4 per cent to 89.8 million head during that same time frame.

Full story at http://www.agcanada.com/daily/drought-creates-speed-bump-for-cattle-herd-expansion

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