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Picking a Sled Trailer part 2


Written By: Steve Whittington, Trailer ManagerSep 30, 2013

Part 2 of Steve's Sled Trailer guide. To see part 1 which focuses on steel vs. aluminum click here

Picking an Enclosed Sled Trailer:  You decided you did not want to clean off your sleds every time you reach your destination. Or you need somewhere to store your machines in the summer, or you want to work on your sleds out of the wind in the staging area.  Whatever your reasons, you’re going to buy an enclosed trailer; now which type? Your options are many.

 To help you understand your options here are how they’re generally classified:

The first way enclosed sled trailers are classified is by how many sleds they carry: 2 place, 3 place or 4 place. 

The second way they are classified is by deck height: lowboy (deck is as low to the ground as possible) mid-deck (the deck is raised for some clearance but not too high, keeping the ramp angle down) and highboy (the deck is above the wheels so the platform is a full 8’ wide).

The third way the trailers are classified by is width, which tends to fall into two broad categories 7’ or 8’ wide (which is really 8’6” wide).

Lastly, the frames will either be steel or aluminum.  

 When it comes to deciding which class of trailer is right for you, it really comes down to your specific needs, but I will give you some things to consider with the most popular classes that may help your decision making.

 2 place, highboy, 8’ 6” wide:  This class of enclosed sled trailer tends to be the most economical.  It is usually single axle without brakes, so a half tonne truck can pull it with no problem.  They are often aluminum so they are quite light, which makes them even easier to move around.   It is a great starter enclosed trailer. The down side of this trailer is that unless you bump up to tandem axles you do not have a drive off front ramp, and if you add another axle and a front ramp your costs sky rocket.  That said, with a reverse option on today’s sleds, is the front drive-off ramp really needed?

 2 or 3 place, lowboy, 7 wide:  This trailer with a steel frame is also very economical.  Being 7’ wide and lower to the ground means they pull well behind a truck. Plus, they are tandem axles so their ride is smoother than a bouncy single axle trailer.  They also have a front ramp so you can drive your sleds in and out with ease.  Beyond those points this trailer is also being used year round as a traditional cargo trailer because it is just the right size – not too big, not too small. Contractors love the access to the trailer with two ramps.  The downside of these trailers is that the loading of three sleds can be difficult, but once you figure out the configuration needed it is not an issue.  As well, being only 7’ wide there is not a lot of room on the inside for cabinets and racking.

 3 or 4 place, lowboy, 8 wide:  These enclosed units have become more popular as a multi-use unit or toy haulers.  Instead of just sled trailers the ramp can be reinforced and you can haul a car or side by side MUV if you make the rear door opening high enough.  If you have a lot of different toys this becomes a really economical option. Instead of two trailers you can get one built for all your toys.  The down side is that you have full size fender boxes inside the trailer to maneuver around when loading your sleds, but trust me that is not a difficult issue, and if it is, are you sure you want to chase powder  between the trees?  The other issue with the lowboys is adding a heater. Generally the propane tanks will have to go on an extended hitch so your trailer gets a little longer overall.

 3 or 4 place, mid-deck, 8 wide: These units are another popular class of toy hauler, but with a little bit more clearance.  The extra clearance comes in handy for added features such an underbelly mounted fuel tank and propane tanks.  The fender boxes inside the units are not as high and can be easily driven over. The disadvantage of these units is the extra clearance; if it is going to be a toy hauler trailer a lot of cars will not be able to make it up the higher angled ramp.

 3 or 4 place, highboy, 8 wide: If there is a traditional enclosed sled trailer, this is it. It is still the most popular option for an enclosed sled trailer. They have a full width deck so it is very easy to drive and position your sleds for travel. The full width provides lots of room for cabinets and racking on the walls.  They have lots of clearance, they track well behind a vehicle on snowy roads, plus with all the deck clearance there are no problems adding options such as on board fueling stations or under deck mounted propane tanks.  Quite simply, they are specifically designed to load sleds and all their accessories the easiest out of all the trailers on the market and as a result, people buy them the most.  The downside of the units is the fact that they are specifically designed for hauling sleds, being so high up you have a hard time loading cargo or recreational power sport vehicles.  Lastly, again being so high up in a cross wind they act as a big sail and they push the tow vehicle around a lot.

 There many other options to consider when buying a sled trailer such as adding heat or cabinets, the type of interior walls, little features such as kick plates and floor drains...the list is endless.  I was talking to a manufacturer about his enclosed sled trailer production run this year and he estimated that 90% of the trailers will be unique coming down the line. The point is, there are a lot of choices in the market place. Make sure that when you are looking for a trailer you talk with someone that can educate you and provide you with all the options so you can get your trailer, your way.

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Posted in Trailer Tips | Tagged with sled trailer steel trailer aluminum trailer enclosed trailers | More articles by Steve Whittington

So many Sled Trailers but what should you choose?


Written By: Steve Whittington, Vice President of Marketing and CommunicationsNov 24, 2011

This season the diversity of choice for a sled trailer can be daunting. There are many brands, different dealers, options and types to choose from. 

Let me try to take you through the choices with a bunch of comparison points as follows: Canadian versus American, steel versus aluminum, open versus enclosed, enclosed 7 wide versus 8.5 ft wide deck over, heated versus not heated and dealer versus dealer.
 
1)      Canadian versus American. Let me start by writing “buy Canadian eh” whenever possible. There, I put it in writing. Not to get political but come on, if you can, support a Canadian company. That said, of the Canadian brands that provide sled trailers, the two leading players are Southland Trailers with their XR Series and Trailtech with their heavy duty steel trailers. There are others in the West notably Rainbow Trailers, Agassiz Trailers and CJay Trailers; however, their choice offering is less than the leading two. That said, the American companies do a good job, the problem is how fluid the industry is. Many companies rise and fall quite quickly (such as Pace American which recently shut its doors). Despite this, competition in the US is thick and there are all kinds of options to choose from, but beware of what you are buying and from whom. At Flaman Trailers we partner with the two leading Canadian companies and several American companies to round out our offering.
 
2)      Steel versus aluminum. The debate rages, but there are some simple facts. Aluminum is lighter and does not rust, but it costs about a 1/3 more. Steel is stronger and on an enclosed unit it is only the tip of the trailer and the tail that is really going to show any rust. On an open deck there is a little more exposure.  With the weight factor, several hundred pounds with a regular pick up makes a heck of a difference for hauling. For instance a two place aluminum open can weigh as little as 480 lb., while a two place steel open can weigh as much as 1345 lb.
 
3)      Open versus enclosed. To be honest, it comes down to available storage, usage and budget. If you have lots of room to store your trailers in for the summer, there’s no need for an enclosed trailer otherwise. As for usage, how many a times a year will you be trailering and how far? Do you need an enclosed staging area? The amount of time you have to spend cleaning grime off your sled gets older every time. That being said, if you are hauling only a few times or short distances, get an open deck trailer, save some money and put it into your sled.
 
4)      Enclosed lowboy/7 ft wide versus enclosed 8.5 ft wide deck over. Traditionally, if you wanted to haul sleds in Canada you purchased an 8.5’ wide deck over trailer. Your sleds parked side by side and loading and unloading was easy through the rear and front ramp. The 8.5’ wide deck over trailers, while convenient for loading, are big and if you have a steel frame trailer you need a big truck to haul your big trailer. Lowboy and 7 ft wide trailers are easier to pull and the 7 ft wide is a more convenient multi-use trailer in the off season than the 8.5 ft deck over. You can also see around the 7 wide and 8 wide lowboys with your mirrors when hauling. But loading is tricky, and you will not be walking in your trailer when loaded, there simply is no room.  
 
5)      Heated versus not heated. To heat or not to heat is a question many a customer has. The benefits of heat are obvious, but are you going to use it enough to justify the added expense? Only you can be the judge of that.
 
6)      Dealer versus dealer. There are many dealers selling sled trailers. Your choices are many but should be made based on product knowledge, service and after sales support – not price! The trailers are all priced differently for a reason. If something is less or more at different dealers it is due to features, product quality and support the dealership offers.  Educate yourself and purchase from a professional that will help you choose the best sled trailer for you.
 
Hope this helps!
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Posted in Trailer Tips | Tagged with snowmobile trailers sled trailers trailer open flat deck enclosed highboy lowboy deck over steel aluminum Canadian | More articles by Steve Whittington

Sled Trailer Season Has Started!


Written By: Steve Whittington, Vice President of Marketing and CommunicationsNov 07, 2011

The days are getting  colder, Halloween has come and gone and this means Sled Trailer season has started!

Flaman Trailers is excited for the start of the season. Flaman Trailers has already been to the Alberta Snowmobile show and the Saskatchewan Snowmobile show.

We have more product choices for you than ever before. Starting with the economical offering of our steel framed Summit Series trailers to the all flat black Stealth trailer from NashCar Trailers, we truly have a trailer for every sled.  Our open deck line has expanded as well. Aluminum tilt trailers with a five year warranty are always popular units.  For the 2012 season Trailtech  has produced a special edition open deck two place. It is an eye catcher with flat black paint, silver reflective tape, white LED lighting and series 7 aluminum rims. 

However, the show stopper is the ultimate custom Stealth 40 foot long gooseneck. This trailer features mirrored interior walls, black hard top flooring, a kitchenette, a rocking stereo system with no less than 4 subs, air conditioning, a 40,000 BTU heater, insulated generator set...and the list goes on and on.  

Last and most exciting is the new photo contest Sled'N Snap (www.slednsnap.com). Flaman Trailers partnered with the Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba snowmobile associations to bring this exciting contest to the sledding community. The contest has it all: six categories to enter into, an entry prize of a two place aluminum tilt trailer per province, and the grand prize, use of a 28’ tag Stealth trailer for a year.  

So this winter season there is a lot going on at Flaman Trailers.  Check back often to keep in the loop.

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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with Snowmobile Trailers Flatdeck Trailers Aluminum Information | More articles by Steve Whittington

Why Buy Aluminum


Written By: Steve Whittington, Vice President of Marketing and CommunicationsFeb 01, 2010

Well, there are many reason to buy an aluminum trailer vs a traditional steel trailer. Firstly Aluminum is lighter by 35- 45% which means your payload is going to be higher than a steel trailer with the same axle rating. Generally though most aluminum trailers have a lighter axles than their steel counterparts but are still able to offer the same payload. This equals a less weight to haul (better fuel economy) and your trailer is easier to move around when hitching up.

Another big advantage of aluminum is that it does not rust nor will you have a rotting wood deck to replace (considering you purchased an aluminum decked trailer). A simple acid wash brings the shine of the trailer immediately back.

One of the main misperceptions about aluminum trailers is that aluminum is not as strong as steel. Actually pound for pound aluminum can be two and half times as strong as steel. The extruded shape and type of aluminum used provides a higher tensile strength. Finally if aluminum was weaker why are airplanes made of it?

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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with Information Aluminum Aluma ATC | More articles by Steve Whittington