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Prepare for that great crop - storage and cleaning


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jun 28, 2016
With everybody forecasting a great crop, are you prepared to harvest it? 

Are the combine(s) fast enough? Are there enough trucks ready to move the grain to a bin or bagging area?  Maybe the ground is wet, so is a grain cart ready to move the grain off the field towards a truck, bin, or bagging area?  Is the bagger ready with enough bags? Are the transfers, augers or conveyors able to quickly unload the grain and move it, which allows for the combine to keep moving without having to wait for unloading?

And once it's off, if you didn’t catch the fusarium with spraying, well it’s not too late.  You can use (1) a gravity table to separate the lighter infected kernels – the current best option for farmers, (2) a colour sorter/separator to pull then visually infected kernels – maybe not as good as a gravity table, or (3) a BoMill which is best used by end-users such as food processing facilities.”

Flaman Grain Cleaning and handling has all you need to get the crop into the bank.



 
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Posted in Crop reports | Tagged with crop report auger conveyor grain handling | More articles by Eric Anderson

Protect that crop from fusarium


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jun 28, 2016
It seems everybody is forecasting a great crop this year!  Now, we can't control the weather, but we can protect the crop from things like fusarium, otherwise it's value will quickly decline.

With the recent warm and wet weather, the fusarium risk is growing in Saskatchewan and ongoing in Manitoba.  Today's risk maps reveal the situation:






So, here are some handy charts to help you assess the risk and plan your spray:






This spraying requires the safe and accurate handling of chemical, and Flaman has what you need to do this.
 
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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with fusarium crop assessment crop report | More articles by Eric Anderson

Mustard prices highest ever due to shortages


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 23, 2015
Reuters

Mustard prices rise on back of weak harvest

From canada to India, there is a squeeze on mustard that has put producers in a pickle.
Prices of the yellow condiment dabbed on hotdogs and pretzels have leaped to their highest level in seven years this autumn as growers in Western canada, which supplies three-quarters of the world’s traded mustard seed, turn in their smallest crop in nine years.In India, the price of a contract representing both mustard seed and rapeseed, related crops grown in the same areas, has surged by a fifth to record highs in the past three weeks over fears that unseasonably hot weather will prevent sowing that would normally begin later this month.
The higher prices threaten to drive up costs for Kraft Heinz Co., maker of Grey Poupon, and Reckitt Benckiser Group Plc, maker of French’s, which hold more than 40 per cent of the market share for North America’s fourth-favourite condiment by sales according to some estimates.
but it is smaller producers like barhyte Specialty Foods in Pendleton, Ore., that are feeling the most immediate pinch. It lost customers after raising its price on organic brands to cover the cost of buying extra supplies from canada.
“We took a big spike this year,” said chief executive chris barhyte, whose company makes private label mustard as well as its own Suzie’s brand. Although the bulk of his mustard seed comes from domestic farmers, he increased purchases from canada to meet heightened demand for organic products that now make up roughly 40 per cent of his overall needs. Prices for canadian organic seed were nearly 30 per cent higher than in past years, he said.
While farmers savour rising prices and food makers bemoan higher costs, those hurting most may be the middlemen who buy crops from farmers on the spot market to meet forward sales.
Some exporters are “panic buying” due to scarcity, said bob Waldbauer, director of mustard seed sales at broadGrain commodities in dafoe, Saskatchewan. “It’s not a matter of price, it’s a matter of supply.”
He declined to name any specific firms. The biggest exporter to the United States is Viterra Inc., a canadian grains trader owned by Swiss mining and trading firm Glencore Plc, according to data from PIerS. company representatives did not respond to requests for comment.

To be sure, ructions in the niche mustard market barely register amid the meltdown engulfing larger commodities.
U.S. imports of mustard seed came to just $52 million last year, almost all of that from canada, and the entire U.S. retail market is worth about $430 million, according to euromonitor. consumers may barely notice, as seeds make up only 15 per cent of the average retail price for a bottle of mustard, said Walter dyck, seed division manager at Wisconsin-based mustard manufacturer Olds Products company.
The crop is a mere blip on the canadian Prairies, where farmers planted 75 times more wheat than mustard this year.
The problem emanates from canada, where farmers sowed only 325,000 acres (131,523 hectares) of mustard this year, less than half the 2003 record high. It has fallen out of favour with many farmers for relatively lower returns.
In addition, dry weather cut yields, producing only 109,300 tonnes of mustard this year, down 45 per cent from last year’s output, according to Statistics canada.
Processors have recently paid farmers 45 to 50 canadian cents per pound for yellow mustard seed on the spot market, where they are likely to source about half their supplies this year, dyck said. “It’s really, really tight.” The impact is felt most keenly in the United States, where local production covers barely a tenth of domestic demand. The rest is imported from canada, with shipments up 15 per cent this year, according to U.S. International Trade commission data.
big, diversified food companies have been partly protected from this year’s rise, thanks to extensive advance purchases, but next year may be a different story, as high spot prices influence a new set of supply contracts.
“clearly when the price goes up, things change. demand and price go hand in hand,” said elliott Penner, president of French’s Food company, which commands 30 per cent market share with sales of $132 million, according to euromonitor.
Kraft Heinz’s Grey Poupon, which is second in the market with 11.5 per cent, is also competing for more seeds, and launched a strategy this year to boost mustard sales. Kraft Heinz declined to comment.
conAgra Foods Inc, whose Gulden’s brand is third at 6 per cent, said it had not experienced any disruption in production.
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Posted in Crop reports | Tagged with mustard commodity prices crop report | More articles by Eric Anderson

Saskatchewan crop report - almost done harvesting


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 15, 2015
October 15, 2015
Warm and relatively dry weather earlier in the week allowed many producers to return to the field.  Ninety-one per cent of the 2015 crop is now combined, up from 84 per cent last week.  The five-year (2010-2014) average for this time of year is 93 per cent combined, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report.

Regionally, producers in the southwest are furthest advanced, having 96 per cent of the crop combined.  Producers in the southeast have 95 per cent combined.  Eighty-eight per cent of the crop is combined in the west-central and northwest regions; 87 per cent in the east-central region and 83 per cent in the northeast.

Ninety-five per cent of durum, 93 per cent of barley, 91 per cent of spring wheat, 89 per cent of canola, 85 per cent of soybeans, 78 per cent of chickpeas, 63 per cent of canary seed and 61 per cent of flax have been combined.

Rainfall this past week ranged from trace amounts to just over an inch in some areas of the province.

Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 10 per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate, five per cent short and one per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as four per cent surplus, 83 per cent adequate, 11 per cent short and two per cent very short.

Strong winds blew remaining swaths around and shelled out some standing crops over the weekend.

Most livestock producers are indicating they have adequate amounts of hay, straw, greenfeed and feed grain for their winter feeding supplies.

Farmers are busy harvesting and completing fall work.

 
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Posted in Crop reports | Tagged with Saskatchewan crop production crop reports | More articles by Eric Anderson

MB crops - harvest nearly done, yields average +, quality average


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 13, 2015
Crop Report: Issue 24, October 13, 2015
 
Weekly Provincial Summary 
  • Provincially, harvest in Manitoba is over 95% complete. Edible beans and field pea harvest is 100% complete, spring cereal crops are 99% complete, canola 98% complete, flax and soybeans 85% complete, sunflowers 50% complete and grain corn 45% complete.
  • Crop yields in Manitoba are generally at or slightly above 10 year average yields. However, lower than average yields for various crop types were reported in some areas of the province, largely due to extreme weather events during the growing season including May and June frost events, wind resulting in lodging, hail and extremes in moisture.
  • Quality for majority of crop types is average. Cereal crops harvested later in the season saw a decrease in quality due to poorer weather conditions at harvest.
  • Germination and stand establishment of winter cereal crops this fall is rated very good to excellent.
  • Fall field work, including tillage, soil testing, post-harvest weed control and fertilizer applications of anhydrous ammonia is on-going.
 
Southwest Region
Growing conditions were favourable in 2015 across most of the Southwest Region. With an early spring, seeding operations started earlier than the previous year. There were cooler weather conditions in early May followed by normal temperatures. However, frost events near the end of May and first week of June across most of the region resulted in crop damage leading to reseeding of impacted acres. Total rainfall over the growing season starting May 1 ranged from 76 to 156% of normal. Precipitation was often timely, which benefited crops. The biggest weather story of the year was the F2 category tornado that touched down near Tilston. Normal to above normal September temperatures allowed most of longer season crops to reach maturity.
 
Overall, harvest is nearly complete in areas south of Highway #1; there may be the odd, later sown field remaining. Harvest operations north of Highway #1 is 80 to 85% complete as precipitation over the last two weeks slowed progress. There was 15 to 30 mm of rain in areas along Highway #16 last week and on the weekend.
 
Winter cereals were good this year due to good growing conditions. There were some reports of frost injury in early June, but most fields recovered very well. Most of the winter wheat harvest was done by mid to end of August. Yield range was 60 to 80 bu/acre. Quality was good due to less fusarium head blight infection. The fall rye crop was average with yields in the 50 to 60 bu/acre range.
 
Spring wheat harvest is nearing completion with yield reports of 50 to 60 bu/acre. Quality loss is noted in some spring wheat samples; however, the majority of the crop was graded as either #1 or #2 CWRS with protein levels averaging 13 to 14.5%. There is still less than 3% of spring wheat to be harvested in areas of north of Highway #1 due to poor harvest conditions. Most of these fields will be downgraded to feed grade due to mildew and sprouting.
Barley yields range from 70 to 80 bu/acre with good quality. Oats yields are average to above average with good quality. Yields range from 95 to 100 bu/acre.
 
The canola crop struggled early in the season as frost at the end of May and first week of June resulted in reseeding of a significant number of canola fields in the Southwest Region. There were also some reports of canola being reseeded due to flea beetles. However, canola yields were generally very good to excellent. Non-reseeded canola is completely harvested with average yields of 40 bu/acre. Approximately 10 to 15% of the reseeded canola remains left to be harvested in northern areas of the region. Reseeded canola yielded approximately 50 bu/acre. The latest harvested canola also has higher moisture levels in the 11 to 13% range and will need to be dried prior to long term storage. Many canola fields had blackleg infection, but sclerotinia was minimal. Quality of the canola crop is good to excellent with majority grading #1 CAN. Minimal downgrading due to green counts occurred this year.
 
Flax harvest continues with progress at 60 to 70% complete, with yields of 30 to 35 bu/acre. Quality is good to excellent. Field peas were very successful in the Southwest Region this year. Most fields yielded 45 to 50 bu/acre with good quality.
 
The soybean harvest experienced better progress later in the week as moisture levels approached dry levels. The soybean harvest is 70 to 75% complete with yield reports continuing at well above long term averages at 40 to 45 bu/acre.
 
Sunflower and grain corn harvest has just nicely started with no reported yields.
 
Established winter wheat and fall rye continue to respond favourably to recent rainfall and periods of above normal temperatures. Most fields are in the 2 to 3 leaf stage, 1 tiller stage of development.
 
Early in the year, hot dry weather prevailed but most areas received timely rains starting in July which benefited hay fields and pastures. Feed supplies are considered adequate in most areas. Some areas report that feed quality is less than average and supplementation to improve feed quality will be required. Greenfeed and silage crops have average to above average yield and quality; in some cases making up the difference for poor hay crops. Straw supplies are adequate.
 
The recent rainfall allowed for excellent conditions for the application of anhydrous ammonia which began across much of the region last week. Subsoil moisture conditions are reported to adequate. However, some areas that received heavier precipitation amounts report excess moisture conditions. Water supplies are adequate.
 
Northwest Region
Favourable harvest weather including drying winds and warm temperatures in the Northwest Region generally resulted in completion of harvest operations. Some fields of flax and soybeans are still remaining; harvest of hemp is just beginning. The favorable weather allowed major progress to be made in fall tillage operations and fertilizer applications.
Wheat harvest is generally complete in the region. The average yield for hard red spring wheat is 45 to 50 bu/acre with about 25% of the crop grading #1 CWRS, 55% grading #2 CWRS, and 20% grading #3 CWRS or less. Some producers are reporting high protein wheat and heavy bushel weights.
 
The canola harvest is also wrapping up at 95% complete. Those acres remaining were reseeded due to spring frost or delayed emergence due to dry spring conditions. Reported canola yields averaged approximately 45 to 50 bu/acre. The quality of canola harvested is average for the region with 70% #1 CAN and 30% #2 CAN.
Approximately 70% of the soybean crop is harvested. The average yield is estimated at 35 to 50 bu/acre, with 75% grading #2 CAN and 25% grading #3 CAN. Harvest of the field pea crop is complete with an average yield of 45 bu/acre grading #2 CAN. The flax crop is approximately 80% complete with an average yield of 25 bu/acre. Most of the flax is grading #2 CW.
The major limitation to crop production for 2015 in the Northwest Region was an early season frost resulting in reseeding of canola. Some canola was also affected by dry conditions in the spring which delayed germination and emergence. These reseeded acres and delayed emerging fields were later staged than the rest of the canola crop.
Producers were able to limit disease and insect pressure due to appropriate application of fungicides and insecticides to susceptible crops at the most beneficial stage.
Some second cut hay harvest still continues due to lack of frost in some areas of the North ‎Parkland. Producers are still cutting meadows in native hay lands as well. Silage harvest is still occurring due to wet conditions delaying operations. Many producers still have cattle on pastures with the warmer weather a allowing for extended grazing. Water supplies are adequate.
 
Central Region
Rainfall over the weekend resulted in 10 to 25 mm of precipitation across most of the Central Region. Unusually warm weather allowed for excellent harvest, field work and fertilization progress. Fall frosts had minimal impact on quality, as crops had matured prior to the frost. Isolated areas in the northwest are still wet, limiting harvest progress, as well as fall field work.
The winter of 2014/15 saw lower than normal snow accumulation. Spring melt was early, and runoff lower than normal for much of the region. Wet conditions last fall delayed the start of seeding in the northwest part of the region, including the Plumas and Glenella areas, but for many producers seeding started in April. The majority of cereals were seeded by the first week of May.
All areas reported dry conditions early in the season and some producers faced the dilemma of choosing to seed shallow into dry soil, or deeper into moisture. Pastures and hay fields were also slow to recover. However, rainfall later in May was very welcome.
Spring growth in general was slow due to cool temperatures through much of May. Very little pre-seed burnoff was done, accounting for some weed issues in the less competitive crops. Snow, sleet and wind in the third week of May was followed by frost at the end of May. Damage to crops resulted in reseeding of canola, and also some soybeans. Heavy rains resulted in crop damage of some degree in much of the region, and hail hit several times through the growing season. Herbicide applications were a struggle due to adverse weather conditions; both weed control and crop tolerance issues resulted. An extended dry period in August limited fill in some crops, dependent on crop stage. Strong winds at intervals through the growing season had a bigger impact than normal, and lodged crops caused many harvest challenges. Smoke from forest fires in July and late August tempered some of the hottest temperatures. The resulting haze may have had some impact on length of bloom period in canola. The late August haze slowed drying time for morning dews, and limited harvesting hours.
Harvest presented challenges as wet conditions caused problems for some producers. Lodged crops were a much bigger concern than in most years. The majority of the winter wheat, spring wheat, oat and barley crops were generally good quality. Later rains resulted in some downgrading, but to a fraction of the crop as compared to 2014.
 
Winter wheat and fall rye came through winter well. Most fields were reported to be in excellent and good condition, with only a fraction of acres rated as fair. Minimal acres were re-seeded; a result of poor germination due to dry conditions last fall. Harvest of winter and spring wheat started in August, with the majority complete by late August/early September.
 
Winter wheat yields ranged from 55 to 90 bu/acre, averaging 60 to 70 bu/acre. Proteins were average to good. Quality was generally good, with average to low fusarium damaged kernel levels. Some downgrading occurred due to mildew and sprouting when poor harvest conditions prevailed. Hybrid and fall rye had some excellent yields, ranging from 60 to 100 bu/acre. There were few if any reports of lodging in winter wheat, fall and hybrid rye.
Spring wheat yields ranged from 45 to 90 bu/acre, with most reporting 55 to 70 bu/acre average. Variability in quality was due to excess moisture causing downgrading at harvest. There is much lower with little if any impact from fusarium head blight. Protein levels were good to excellent. CPSR and general purpose wheats ranged from 50 to 100 bu/acre, averaging 60 to 70 bu/acre, with lower proteins on the higher yielding fields. On average, proteins were higher than last year. Lodging was a significant issue in many of the spring wheat fields. Although some yields were lower than expected, yields were remarkable for the extent of lodging.
Barley yields ranged from 70 to 90 bu/acre, with the majority averaging 70 to 85 bu/acre. Quality is good. Oats ranged from 90 to 140 bu/acre, averaging 110 to 125 bu. Less of the crop was downgraded this year; majority is grading #3 CAN or better. Downgrading that did occur was due to mildew where rain during harvest was an issue. There were higher number of thin kernels noted in some fields, but the majority of acres had good to excellent bushel weights. The oat crop was better than anticipated, following the extensive lodging problems or delayed harvest due to green stems.
Canola yields were good to excellent, although the average yield is down from last year. The crop struggled early on; seed sat in cold ground for an extended period making it more susceptible to flea beetles and seedling diseases. Cutworms were an issue in some fields. Some fields were reseeded due to the early season stresses, with the late May frost having the biggest impact. Many fields had problems with blackleg. Sclerotinia had a somewhat bigger impact than last year, and in combination with lodging due to strong winds in July, harvest was a challenge. Yields were variable, ranging from 15 to 60 bu/acre, averaging 40 to 45 bu/acre. Many yields benefited from the crop being swathed late, or straight cut. Excess water and quality is excellent for the most part, with the crop grading #1 CAN. Minimal if any downgrading due to green count this year, although there were some reports of sprouts where swaths sat for extended periods.
 
Flax yields range from 18 to 37 bu/acre; average is expected to be in the 25 to 33 bu/acre range. Quality is good. Peas ranged from 40 to 60 bu/acre; average 50 bu/acre. Harvest is complete.
 
Edible bean harvest is complete. Yields are lower than last year, averaging 1500 lbs/acre, with most ranging from 1200 to 2000 lbs/acre. Quality is good. White mould was reported, but no significant yield or quality loss.
 
Soybean harvest is essentially complete. Yields vary from 15 to 60 bu/acre, averaging 35 to 40 bu/acre. Higher yields were obtained in areas receiving timely rains. A stretch of hot dry weather limited pod fill in some cases. White mould was reported, with minimal impact to yield or quality. Phytophthera was evident in almost every field, although impact was limited. Root rots related to fusarium, pythium and rhizoctonia were also evident. There was also little if any impact from soybean aphid, but cutworms were an issue in some fields early on, and some reseeding took place.
 
Sunflower harvest continues. Yield reports to date range from 1500 to 3000 lbs/acre, with average expected to be in the 1800 to 2200 lb/acre range. Sclerotinia had some impact with some lower test weights reported. Desiccation prior to harvest continues to increase, improving quality and yield with earlier harvest.
Grain corn harvest continues. Early yields range from 100 to 140 bu/acre, with average yields to date in the 100 to 120 bu/acre range. Kernel moisture levels range from the low 20% to 30% for the later maturing hybrids, but are declining. Many will wait for dry down before harvest to limit the cost of drying. Corn silage is wrapping up; average yields of 12 to 15 tons/acre.
 Potatoes ‎in the MacGregor area yielded 320 to 350 cwt and in the Carberry area, yield is 400+.
 
Winter wheat seeded acres are flat to lower in the region; there are fewer acres in some areas but increased in others. There is pressure on winter wheat acres, including excellent yields seen in hard red spring, general purpose and CPSR wheats. However, producers continue to include winter wheat into rotation to spread out work load and feed supply requirement. Germination and stand establishment is good to excellent this year. Crop development ranges up to the four leaf stage.
 
Impact of disease in most crops was minimal in 2015. Root rots were evident in many crops, both early in the season, and later when soils dried out. Sclerotinia was evident in all susceptible crops, generally at lower levels, but with some impact to yield. Most of the later canola fields were not treated with fungicide. Blackleg lesions were evident in many canola fields, and levels are increasing every year. Aster yellows were almost non-existent in canola. Leaf spotting diseases including brown spot and bacterial blight were evident in soybeans, and bacterial blight in edible beans. Fusarium head blight was not the issue in cereals as it was in 2014.
 
The main insect problems this year were flea beetles, cutworms and grasshoppers. Isolated spraying continued to the end of August for grasshoppers. There were some wireworm problems early in the season. Some diamondback moth larvae feeding and some lygus damage were noted. Minimal insecticide applications were necessary. High numbers of beneficial insects were seen in many fields.
Soil testing continues. Results are variable, but there are many reports of very low soil test nitrogen and phosphorous. In the case of phosphorous (P), there are several reasons: tighter rotations leaning to big phosphorous-use crops, changes in seeding implements that limit the amount of P safely applied with seed, changes to crops in rotation (i.e. soybeans) that are very sensitive to seed-placed P but are big users of P, and trend to higher average yields while applied P levels remain the same.
 
Fall cultivation continues with excellent progress made in much of the region; majority of harvested fields have seen one tillage pass, except in the northwest areas. Post-harvest weed control has wrapped up with recent frosts. Fall fertilizing has begun, but progress is slower than normal, mostly due to warmer than normal temperatures. Good conditions allow for anhydrous ammonia applications. Many have waited for soil temperatures to cool and harvest to be completed. There continues to be an increase in fall phosphate fertilizer applications, due to low soil test P levels, as well as equipment limitations for spring seed-placed or side-banded applications at ‘seed-safe’ levels.
 
Manure applications are made as conditions allow. The percentage of crop residue burned is very low this year. Demand for straw continues to be good, and much of the straw is baled. Excellent choppers improved the ease of returning straw to the soil.
 
Hay fields are in fair to good condition. Alfalfa hay saw average yields of 1.25 tonnes/acre for first cut, 0.6 tonnes/acre for second cut and 0.4 tonnes/acre for third cut. Brome/alfalfa hay had average yields of 1.5 tonnes/acre for first cut and 0.6 tonnes/acre for second cut. Other tame hay had an average first cut yield of 1.25 tonnes/acre. Wild hay had an average first cut yield of 0.8 to 1.0 tonnes/acre. Greenfeed had an average yield of 2.0 tonnes/acre. There is an adequate to good supply of almost all classes of feed, including straw, for most of the region. Some shortages will be seen, including around Lake Manitoba due to continuing wet conditions. Quality of feed is good, with some issues due to maturity and rain during harvest periods. Cattle will be coming off summer pasture soon. Some cattle were moved to harvested crop land; others will be moved to second or third cut hay fields for fall grazing. Late fall corn grazing should start mid to late November, to be supplemented with hay. Pastures in the south and west areas of the region are rated as fair to poor due to dry conditions; northwest area pastures are rated as good. Dugouts range from 60 to 100% full.
 
Eastern Region
Over the weekend, rainfall occurred across most districts of the Eastern Region. Rainfall accumulations ranged from 10 to 26 mm with higher accumulations occurring in northern areas. Rainfall events were accompanied by winds up to 70 km/hr with gusts to 100 km/hr. Some lodging of sunflower and corn crops awaiting harvest occurred but damage appears to be minimal. Harvesting and other field operations are expected to resume later in the week. Producers in the Eastern Region are mostly caught up with their field work. Manure application is on-going when weather permits. Topsoil moisture conditions for both crop land and hay/pasture land across the region are rated as adequate.
Winter wheat had an average yield of 63 bu/acre with the crop grading 45% #2 CWRW, 45% #3 CWRW and 10% CW Feed. Producers expressed concern with generally lower than expected yields and sometimes higher than expected levels of fusarium head blight infection. The acres seeded to winter wheat this fall has dropped by approximately 35% compared to the fall of 2014.
 
Spring wheat had an average yield of 52 bu/acre with the crop grading 10% #1 CW, 80% #2 CW, 5% #3 CW and 5% CW Feed. While fusarium head blight was present, it was not considered a significant quality issue. Oats had an average yield of 100 bu/acre with the crop grading 60% #2 CW, 30% #3 CW, 5% #4 CW and 5% Feed.
Canola had an average yield of 42 bu/acre with 100% of the crop grading #1 CAN.
The soybean harvest in the Eastern Region is virtually complete with only a few fields remaining to harvest. Soybeans have an average yield of 39 bu/acre with 100% of the crop grading #2 CAN. Corn harvest is around 35% complete with average yields of 145 bu/acre; 100% of crop grading #2 CW thus far. Sunflower harvest is approximately 60% complete; average yield to date of 1750 lbs/acre with grading still to be determined. Quality problems are anticipated, particularly with confectionary types. Significant levels of head rot were noted in many sunflower fields.
Alfalfa hay saw average yields of 2 tons/acre for first cut, 2 tons/acre for second cut and 1 ton/acre for third cut. Brome/alfalfa hay had average yields of 2.25 tons/acre for first cut and 1.75 tons/acre for second cut. Other tame hay had an average first cut yield of 1.75 tons/acre. Wild hay had an average first cut yield of 1 ton/acre. Greenfeed had an average yield of 2.5 tons/acre. Currently, hay supplies are rated at 15% surplus and 85% adequate. Straw, greenfeed and feed grain supplies are all rated as adequate. Overall, winter feed supplies in most areas are good with producers having a surplus of hay. With the rains this past summer, hay quality is down from last year. Most cattle are still out on pasture, and some producers have moved calves home or to market.
 
Interlake Region
Overall, the 2015 cropping year was considered average in the Interlake Region. Weather events such as thunderstorms and hail throughout the season caused crop loss through reduced stands or shattering of standing/swathed crops. In some areas of the region including Eriksdale, Ashern and Moosehorn areas, dry conditions resulted in poor crop germination, limited pasture use and reduced hay yields. However, excess moisture impacted many acres in the region, including Arborg, Riverton, Teulon, Selkirk and Woodlands areas. Drier conditions were experienced in the Eriksdale, Ashern and Moosehorn region.
 
Over the past week, above seasonal temperatures along with minimal rainfall allowed producers to continue and finish up harvest in some areas. Harvest is estimated to be 95% complete in the Interlake Region. Soybeans, sunflowers, and grain/silage corn are all that is remaining to be harvested
.
Winter wheat averaged 60 to 70 bu/acre with proteins ranging from 10.5 to 11.0%. Most winter wheat was graded #2 CWRW with very few samples showing any fusarium head blight.
Spring wheat yields varied throughout the region. South Interlake had many producers reporting 60 to 70 bu/acre while north Interlake reports came in at 40 to 60 bu/acre with proteins ranging from 13.5 to 16.0%. Most spring wheat graded #2 CW due to environmental conditions during harvest. Barley and oats came off good this year with barley averaging 70 to 80 bu/acre, and oats averaging 90 to 110 bu/acre with the majority grading a #2 CW. Overall, there was very little disease pressure in cereal crops this year.
Canola yields ranged from 30 to 40 bu/acre with some reports of yields going as high as 50 to 60 bu/acre in certain areas. Majority of canola was graded #1 CAN. Flax yields ranged from 10 to 25 bu/acre. Peas came in at 50 to 60 bu/acre and all graded a #1 CAN. Soybean yields range from 30 to 40 bu/acre with no grading issues noted.

Harvesting of sunflowers is still ongoing with no reports on yields and grain corn harvest is expected to start later in the week.
 
Fall tillage is on-going but with recent rain events progress will be slowed for a few days.
Rains over the Thanksgiving weekend brought many of the soils in the Interlake Region up to field capacity for moisture. Some corn silage has yet to be harvested; second and third cut alfalfa is virtually complete. Cattle are being moved home or to market from summer pastures. 
 
 
 
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Posted in Crop reports | Tagged with Manitoba. crop report crop conditions | More articles by Eric Anderson

Alberta crops - yield index improved to 87% of the 5 year yield average


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 09, 2015
Alberta Crop Conditions as of October 6, 2015

Producers were able to make good use of a few days of good harvest weather this past week before being shut down again by cool, wet conditions on the weekend. Over 72% of the province has now been harvested, up 15 percentage points from last week. A further 17% of crops in the province are in the swath with 11% remaining standing. In 2014, 82% of harvest in the province had been completed. Most areas received between 15 – 50 mm of rain this past week end with light snow reported along the foothills. Hard frosts were reported on several days which should be beneficial in killing off green growth and enhancing dry down.

Reported yields for all crops continue to improve in all regions. The provincial yield index improved to 87% of the 5 year yield average, up 3.5 index points from 2 weeks ago. Yields remain below long term averages but better than originally anticipated reflecting the good soil moisture conditions early in the season and the willingness of producers in all regions to use good soil moisture conservation production practices. Crop quality has declined due to the slowness of the harvest progress though generally is in line with the longer term 5 and 10 year averages. 76% of the spring wheat is grading #1 or #2 CWRS with 8% grading Canada Feed. Long term 10 year averages are 71% grading #1 & #2 with 9% grading Canada Feed. 82% of canola is expected to grade 1 Canada versus the 10 year average of 79%.

The crop condition ratings of the 2015/16 fall seeded crops are: 8% Poor; 27% Fair; 49% Good; 16% Excellent.

Provincial soil moisture ratings continue to improve as a result of the continuing precipitation. Surface moisture is rated 60% good or excellent while sub soil moisture is rated at 51% good or excellent.



Regional Assessments:
The 2015 Alberta Crop Report Series provides summaries for the following five regions:

Region One: Southern (Strathmore, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat, Foremost)
  • Harvest is virtually completed with the exception of some late harvested crops such as sugar beets, grain corn, flax.
  • The regional 5 year yield index sits at 82.0%, the lowest of all regions and 5 index points below the provincial average.
  • Spring wheat yields at 84% of their 5 year average, durum at 78%, barley at 87%, canola at 79%.
  • 55% of surface soil moisture and 48% of sub soil moisture rated good or excellent.
  • Approximately 75% of fall seeded crops are grown in this region. Crop conditions are rated 8% Poor; 24% Fair; 48% Good; 20% Excellent.
Region Two: Central (Rimbey, Airdrie, Coronation, Oyen)
  • Harvest progress advanced by more than 20 percentage points this past week to 61% complete & 20% swathed.
  • The regional 5 year yield index sits at 90.8%, up more than 1 index point from last report.
  • Spring wheat yields at 90% of their 5 year average, durum at 74%, barley at 92%, canola at 93%.
  • 66% of surface soil moisture and 72% of sub soil moisture rated good or excellent.
Region Three: North East (Smoky Lake, Vermilion, Camrose, Provost)
  • Harvest progress advanced by 14 percentage points for the week to 58% complete & 32% swathed.
  • The regional 5 year yield index showed another big increase this week and sits at 85.7%, up 4.5 index points.
  • Spring wheat yields at 86% of their 5 year average, barley at 78%, canola at 89%.
  • 70% of surface soil moisture and 57% of sub soil moisture rated good or excellent.
Region Four: North West (Barrhead, Edmonton, Leduc, Drayton Valley, Athabasca)
  • Harvest progress advanced 11 percentage points for the week to 52% complete & 31% swathed.
  • The regional 5 year average yield index increased more than 6 index points to 86.0% this week due to significant yield improvements for all crops, but specifically barley and canola.
  • Spring wheat yields at 88% of their 5 year average, barley at 80%, canola at 87%.
  • 33% of surface soil moisture and 14% of sub soil moisture rated good or excellent.
Region Five: Peace River (Fairview, Falher, Grande Prairie, Valleyview)
  • Harvest progress is second highest of the regions with 85% complete, up 17 percentage points for the week. 8% swathed.
  • The regional 5 year yield index rose almost 3 index points to 94.4% based upon yield improvements to all crops but particularly a 1 bushel/acre increase to canola since last reported.
  • Spring wheat yields at 85% of their 5 year average, barley at 97%, canola at 100%.
  • 44% of surface soil moisture and 38% of sub soil moisture rated good or excellent.


 
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Saskatchewan crop yields within average range


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 08, 2015
Crop report for the period September 29 to October 5, 2015
 
Released on October 8, 2015
 
Wet and cool weather over the weekend has slowed harvest progress for many producers, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report.  Eighty-four per cent of the crop is now in the bin, up from 74 per cent last week.  Twelve per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut.
 
The five-year (2010-2014) average for this time of year is 83 per cent combined and 12 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut
 
Regionally, producers in the southeast are furthest advanced, having 94 per cent of the crop combined.  Producers in the southwest have 92 per cent combined.  Eighty-one per cent of the crop is combined in the west-central region; 75 per cent in the east-central region; 74 per cent in the northeast and 73 per cent in the northwest.
 
Eighty-six per cent of barley, 85 per cent of durum, 84 per cent of spring wheat, 81 per cent of canola, 79 per cent of soybeans, 61 per cent of chickpeas, 47 per cent of flax and 45 per cent of canary seed have been combined
 
Crop yields vary from region to region but are generally within the average range.  Average yields are reported as 37 bushels per acre for spring wheat, 32 bushels per acre for durum, 59 bushels per acre for barley, 34 bushels per acre for canola and 32 bushels per acre for peas.
 
Of the hard red spring wheat that has been harvested so far, 27 per cent is expected to fall into the 1CW grade, 41 per cent into 2CW, 23 per cent into 3CW and nine per cent into CW feed.
 
Rainfall last week ranged from trace amounts to nearly two inches in the southwest.  Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 14 per cent surplus, 78 per cent adequate and eight per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate, 11 per cent short and four per cent very short.
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Wheat production estimates up significantly, Canola expected to keep climbing further


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 02, 2015

CNS Canada — Despite an upward revision of nearly a million tonnes in Statistics Canada’s latest report [this morning’s], most analysts expect canola production will keep climbing further.

 

StatsCan on Friday morning released its updated grain/oilseed production estimates, with data collected through surveys taken between Sept. 3 and 13.

 

Canola production numbers came in at 14.3 million tonnes, which compares to 13.3 million in the previous report. Canada grew 16.4 million tonnes of canola in 2014.

 

Jonathon Driedger of FarmLink Marketing Solutions, near Grunthal, Man., described the report as pretty uneventful.

 

“Most numbers came in line with what the trade was expecting. Probably in the case of canola the number is pretty close to the recent number StatsCan has put out with their different methodology,” he said, referring to the agency’s September report which took into account satellite data and environmental factors along with survey responses.

 

Another analyst agreed with the notion that canola will likely keep increasing in subsequent reports.

 

“The next report is going to be closer to 15 (million tonnes) than 14.5, I can guarantee you,” said Wayne Palmer of Agri-Trend Marketing in Winnipeg.

Mike Jubinville of ProFarmer Canada said he thinks the StatsCan survey likely missed the period when yields started to increase as a result of the late summer rain.

 

“The last third or half of this harvest is probably where some of the bigger yields are. This survey was from the 3rd (of September) to the 13th, so it didn’t capture that.”

 

Most of the other crop estimates, he said, were in line with what he expected, except for barley.

 

“StatsCan boosted the harvest area by 138,000 acres, which is a bit unusual,” he said, adding that if anything, he thought barley would have lost acreage. Canada grew 7.1 million tonnes of barley last year.

 

StatsCan pegged barley production in today’s report at 7.6 million tonnes, compared to 7.3 million in the previous report.

 

All-wheat production also rose by a significant margin. StatsCan pegged it in today’s report at 26.1 million tonnes, which compares to 24.6 million in the previous report. Last year Canada grew 29.4 million tonnes of all wheat.

 

Keith Ferley of RBC Dominion Securities in Winnipeg said he was a little surprised by the increase but doesn’t expect it to rise much further in any subsequent reports.

 

“The cereals didn’t respond in the dry western regions as well as the canola did, because the rains came too late for them,” he explained.

For Jubinville’s part, he thinks all-wheat production numbers could still keep climbing.

 

“I won’t be surprised if the yield average gets bumped up more… we could see a 27 million (-tonne) wheat crop,” he said.

 

Dave Sims writes for Commodity News Service Canada, a Winnipeg company specializing in grain and commodity market reporting. Follow CNS Canada at @CNSCanada on Twitter.

 

 

Table: A quick summary of Statistics Canada’s latest crop production estimates for 2015-16, in millions of tonnes. Pre-report estimates and final 2014-15 figures included for comparison.

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Prairies' harvest a tale of two wheat crops


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 02, 2015

CNS Canada — Prairie farmers are in the final stages of harvesting the 2015 wheat crop, and while yields continue to beat earlier expectations, there’s a distinct quality difference between crops harvested early and those harvested late.

“In our country, all of the grain was top grade, but anything that was left out at this stage is probably a No. 3,” said Bill Craddock, a Manitoba farmer and local trader.

That sentiment is even more pronounced in Saskatchewan and Alberta.

“The first half of harvest had quality patterns in the top tier,” said market analyst Jon Driedger of Farm Link Marketing Solutions.

However, while the early-harvested wheat was generally hitting No. 1 or No. 2 quality levels, the last half was hit by rain and a good portion of that will grade No. 3 or lower.

The question now is how much will be pushed all the way down into feed-grade and how much is still salvageable for milling quality, said Driedger. “The longer this drags out, the worse it gets.”

However, grade spreads for the good-quality early-harvested wheat are not widening out as much as could be expected, with the trade still feeling it will be able to work with the supplies available, he said.

The supply of good-quality grain is still better than last year when there was more widespread degradation, said Neil Townsend, director of market research services at G3 Canada, formerly CWB.

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Spot mustard prices hit fresh highs on reduced acreage


Written By: Eric Anderson, Sep 30, 2015

CNS Canada — Producers who opted against selling mustard earlier in the season are now relishing the spot market, which is reaching fresh highs not seen since 2008 against contract prices.

Delivered elevator prices are between 45 to 46 cents per pound for yellow mustard, 31 to 33 for brown, and 34 to 36 for oriental, according to Prairie Ag Hotwire.

Those prices are the highest they’ve been against contract prices in seven years, said Walter Dyck of Olds Foods Products.

“I think the market is moving now because it anticipates a small crop,” he said. “I think that caught a lot of people by surprise.”

This year’s production is estimated at 109,400 tonnes, compared with 198,000 in 2014, according to Statistics Canada.

Farmers only have limited amount of land they can put into oilseeds, so this may have just been one of those years where it was tricky for producers to work mustard into their rotation, Dyck said.

There was also a shortage of certified planting seed in Canada this year.

Despite minor complications, the mustard harvest has been progressing well in Saskatchewan and Alberta.

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South Africa to have smallest wheat crop since 2011


Written By: Eric Anderson, Sep 30, 2015

Bloomberg is reporting that:

South Africa cut its forecast for wheat production by 3.3 percent for this season as poor conditions in the biggest growing region reduced yields, the Crop Estimates Committee said.

Local growers may reap 1.64 million metric tons in the 2015 season,  Marda Scheepers, a senior statistician for the Pretoria-based committee, said by phone Tuesday. This is less than the 1.67 million-ton median estimate by five analysts in a Bloomberg survey and smaller than the CEC’s August prediction of 1.69 million tons. This would be the smallest harvest since the 2011 season.

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Manitoba crop report Sept 21


Written By: Eric Anderson, Sep 21, 2015

MB Crop Report: Issue 21, September 21, 2015

 

Weekly Provincial Summary 

•Above normal temperatures allowed for excellent harvest progress over the past week in Manitoba, with harvest of spring cereal crops nearing completion.

•Harvest of canola, flax, edible beans and soybeans continues. Sunflower harvest has also started in the Central and Eastern Regions, and grain corn harvest is expected to start shortly in some areas of the province.

•Seeding of winter wheat is almost complete, and the earliest seeded winter wheat has emerged. Acreage seeded to winter wheat will be consistent from last year in some regions and higher in other regions.

 

Southwest Region

In the Southwest Region, seasonal temperatures over the weekend allowed harvest activities to resume after rainfall amounts of 10 to 15 mm occurred mid-week.

 

Spring cereal crop harvest in the Southwest Region is 95 to 100% complete; areas that received heavier precipitation amounts still have some cereal acres to harvest. There is quality loss noted across all spring cereal crops due to staining, sprouting, as well as lower bushel weights.

 

The canola harvest is progressing as 40 to 50% of acres are complete in areas north of Highway #1 and 80% complete south of Highway #1. Reseeded canola is swathed and it is anticipated harvesting of those fields will begin later this week. Overall to date, canola yields range from 35 to 60 bu/acre, with most fields yielding 40 to 45 bu/acre. On fields that were not reseeded, yields are generally above average.

 

Flax fields continue to be desiccated in preparation for harvest. The odd field has been harvested with no yield reports to date.

 

Soybean maturity is in the R7 (seed fill to capacity) to R8 (brown pod/mature) stage of development, with most early varieties mature. Some initial harvest has begun on the earlier maturing varieties with yields in the 35 to 40 bu/acre range.

 

Sunflowers and grain corn continue to mature without any major disease issues.

 

Winter wheat and fall rye seeding saw good progress after the rain last week. Acreage seeded to winter cereals is up over last year’s acreage.

 

Some light field work and weed control measures are occurring in harvested fields.

 

Second cut alfalfa continues to be harvested with yields average to above average with variable quality depending upon rainfall. Corn silage harvest has begun in the more southern areas of the region with above average yields reported. Water levels in dugouts are at approximately 85 to 90% of capacity.

 

Northwest Region

Unsettled weather conditions prevailed through the north half of the Northwest Region during most of the week, causing a delay in harvest progress throughout most of that area. There were reports of light frost in some parts of the region but no reported crop injury. Over 50 mm of precipitation were recorded in parts of the Swan Valley. More favorable harvest conditions returned to the region on the weekend allowing harvest to resume.

 

Overall, harvest is approximately 65% complete for the region. In the southern part of the region (north of Ste Rose), producers have mostly field corn and soybeans left to harvest. The rest of the region is waiting on canola, flax, soybeans and grain corn. Average quality is reported for most crops harvested in the region.

 

In many cases, fall field work operations are caught up to harvest and many tilled fields have good growth of weeds and volunteer plants. Soil moisture conditions are adequate in most parts of the region but are excessive in The Pas and in some localized areas around McCreary and the Swan Valley.

 

Corn silage harvest has started where the correct stage has been reached or where crops have dried down due to frosts. Producers are still harvesting second cut alfalfa in some areas. Pastures are slowing in growth. Water supplies are adequate.

 

Central Region

Average to above average temperatures were seen through much of the week in the Central Region, and the beautiful weather allowed harvest to progress over the weekend. Rainfall amounts of 5 to 15 mm fell over much of the region on Thursday, slowing harvest temporarily. Standing water remains in some fields from earlier rains, and heavy dews are common. Light frost was reported on Saturday above the escarpment, but is not expected to have caused significant damage to crops remaining to be harvested. Rain would be welcome in much of the southwest part of the region, above the escarpment.

 

Only a few cereal fields remain to be harvested in the Central Region. Majority of the canola harvest is also complete, with the last reseeded fields swathed and drying down, or standing and waiting for conditions to allow for straight cutting. Canola yield continue to be variable, ranging from 10 to 15 bu/acre in areas that experienced excess moisture, to 40 to 50 bu/acre.

 

Most pea fields are harvested with yields in the 40 to 50 bu/acre range. Flax harvest continues; yield reports range from 18 to 35 bu/acre. Potato digging continues.

 

Desiccation of sunflowers is mostly complete. Harvest has begun on the earliest fields; early yields of 2000 to 3000 lbs/acre are reported. Corn is maturing and drying down. Some fields benefitted from recent rains. Corn silage harvest has begun.

 

Edible bean harvest continues as conditions allow, with average yields. Soybean harvest has begun, with less than 10% of acres completed. Early yields range in the 35 to 50 bu/acre range. Areas that received higher rainfall amounts are lower in yield, and fields in the southeast areas that were impacted by hail in August are yielding 10 bu/acre or slightly higher.

 

There is good regrowth of perennial weeds post-harvest, allowing for control measures to be made in preparation for next year.

 

Fall tillage is underway where conditions allow. Many fields have firmed up after the recent heavy rains. There are still a number of fields that are too wet to work properly; some will need more drying time. Dry areas have received enough rainfall to work reasonably well. Soil testing continues. Fall fertilizing has started, but slowed as the soybean harvest picks up.

 

Fall rye and winter wheat are seeded; crops are germinating and starting to emerge. Additional moisture will be welcome above the escarpment to support fall development. At this point, seeded acres are expected to be flat to slightly above last year’s acres.

 

Hay harvest is mostly complete for second cut in southern areas, with reasonable yield and quality. Some third cut is being done, with more to follow, in the west. In the northwest part of the region, second cut haying is mostly being delayed until close to a frost to avoid cutting during the critical fall period. Pasture growth has slowed or stopped, dependent on moisture conditions. Low lying areas of fields, sloughs and field perimeters are being utilized wherever possible to extend the grazing period. Hay and pasture in areas above the escarpment would benefit from significant rain, and most are rated fair to very poor. The same areas report adequate to less than adequate livestock water supply.

 

Eastern Region

The weather in the Eastern Region last week was warmer than the previous week. Reports of 3 to 7 mm of precipitation fell in the region on Thursday, temporarily slowing down harvest. There is no standing water in fields but there remain occasional wet spots that producers are avoiding. Overall, harvest progress was made, with the focus on finishing canola and spring cereal crops.

 

Spring wheat harvest is 95% complete with an average yield of 55 bu/acre and average quality. About 95% of the oat crop is harvested with an average yield of 110 bu/acre and average quality. About 80% of the canola is harvested with an average yield of 40 bu/acre and average quality.

 

The majority of soybeans are in the R8 growth stages with some later fields still at the late R7 stage. Isolated reports have come in of some soybean harvesting in northern parts of the region with initial yield reports of 45 bu/ac with good quality. If weather is favourable, soybean harvest will become more general this week.

 

Sunflowers are in the R9 growth stage and desiccation has occurred in some fields. There was one field of sunflowers harvested in the northern part of the region; no yield reports yet. Head rots continue to be noted, with crop damage and yield loss to be determined once harvest begins.

 

Corn is in the late dent (R5) to maturity (R6) growth stages.

 

Field work and winter wheat seeding resumed as fields dried from the previous week’s precipitation.

 

Pasture conditions are rated at 60% good, 20% fair and 20% poor. Second cut grass hay was coming down on the weekend and some producers are having access issues to some fields to get first cut grass hay. Currently, hay supplies are rated at 20% surplus and 80% adequate. Straw, greenfeed and feed grain supplies are all rated as adequate. Pastures are in good condition with a couple producers stating to feed bales. Availability of livestock water is also adequate.

 

Interlake Region

In the Interlake Region, trace amounts of precipitation were recorded in the area, averaging from 1 to 6 mm. Warm temperatures and windy conditions allowed producers to continue harvesting throughout the week. Field conditions are still wet in areas with producers having a difficult time crossing some fields.

 

Estimated harvest progress is approximately 55 to 65% complete. Harvest of spring cereal crops is nearly complete in the Interlake Region. Quality of grain is declining as cereals that are left to harvest have sprouting and mildew issues.

 

Canola harvest is nearly complete, but some late seeded crops are still in swath waiting to mature. Some canola has been desiccated and left standing for straight cutting.

 

Alfalfa seed harvest should start this week as fields mature. Soybean harvest could start this week as crops reach maturity. Sunflowers will be desiccated this week as maturity is reached.

 

Winter wheat seeding is nearly complete as some producers had a later start due to delay of canola harvesting. Fall tillage is on-going as fields dry.

 

Pastures are in good shape for this time of year due to frequent rains in July and August, as well as no killing frosts to date. Greenfeed crops yielded well; corn for silage looks promising.

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StatsCan raises wheat, canola estimates with new model


Written By: Eric Anderson, Sep 17, 2015

CNS Canada — Wheat and canola production are expected to be higher than in previous estimates, but still lower than in 2014, according to a new Statistics Canada model for field crop production estimates.

The model-based report, released Thursday, pegs this year’s spring wheat production at 18.4 million tonnes, higher than previously forecast in the Aug. 21 Production of Principal Field Crops report, which estimated spring wheat production at about 18 million.

Despite the increase, wheat production will still be down 13 per cent from 2014.

Canola production is expected to hit 14.4 million tonnes, compared with Aug. 21 estimate of 13.3 million.

However, canola will still see an 11.6 per cent decrease from 2014.

At this point, traders are shrugging off the new information, but it could act as an influencer moving forward.

The report, using data collected up to the end of August, confirms what the market had expected, said Jerry Klassen, manager of the Canadian office for Swiss-based GAP SA Grains and Products.

“I don’t think this is having too much of an impact overall, I think it confirms we’re down from last year.

“For now I think the trade is fairly comfortable with that production number.”

The new model-based principal field estimates are calculated with a system developed by StatsCan and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

The report isn’t more or less accurate than StatsCan’s previous crop production report; it’s just a different way of collecting the information, said Cindy Carter, senior analyst for StatsCan’s crops unit.

“They’re looking at having this model replace the September survey in the future.”

The method incorporates coarse-resolution satellite and agroclimatic data and incorporates information from StatsCan’s field crop reporting series.

Klassen said traders will balance the survey-based and model-based numbers and use both to come up with a yield estimate.

“It helps give us an idea, if there was significant discrepancies on the survey — it’s one more piece of information that can be used.”

The model-based report puts soybean production across Canada at 5.9 million tonnes, up 2.1 per cent from 2014, while grain corn is expected to total 12.7 million tonnes, up 12.5 per cent.

Barley production is pegged at seven million tonnes, up 0.5 per cent from 2014, while oat production is forecast to rise 10.9 per cent to 3.2 million tonnes.

Jade Markus writes for Commodity News Service Canada, a Winnipeg company specializing in grain and commodity market reporting. Follow her at @jade_markus on Twitter. Includes files from AGCanada.com Network staff.

Table: A quick summary of Statistics Canada’s model-based principal field crop estimates as of Aug. 31, 2015, released Sept. 17, 2015. Survey production estimates and last year’s crop production are included for comparison. Production in millions of tonnes.

  Model.  . Survey.  . 2014-15
Spring wheat.   . 18.4 18.0 21.3
Durum 4.8 4.5 5.2
Oats 3.2 3.3 3.0
Barley 7.0 7.3 7.1
Canola 14.4 13.3 16.4

 

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SK harvest is ahead of average, yields have been "average"


Written By: Eric Anderson, Sep 17, 2015

SK CROP REPORT FOR THE PERIOD SEPTEMBER 8 TO 14, 2015

Released on September 17, 2015 by Gov’t of SK

 

Harvest is advancing despite delays due to wet field conditions.  Warm and dry weather is needed before many producers can return to the field.

Fifty-two per cent of the 2015 crop is combined and 30 per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report.  The five-year (2010-2014) average for this time of year is 42 per cent combined and 33 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Regionally, producers in the southwest are furthest advanced, having 75 per cent of the crop combined.  Producers in the southeast have 73 per cent combined.   Forty per cent of the crop is combined in the west-central region; 37 per cent in the east-central region; 30 per cent in the northwest and 29 per cent in the northeast.

Rainfall this past week ranged from trace amounts to more than an inch in some southwestern and northeastern areas.  Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 11 per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate, six per cent short and one per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as five per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate, 12 per cent short and two per cent very short.

Strong winds have blown swaths around and lodged and shelled out some standing crops.  Some parts of the province received frost, but damage is minimal in most cases as crops were mature.

Of the crops that have been harvested so far, 86 per cent of field peas, 76 per cent of lentils and 70 per cent of durum are estimated to fall within the top two quality grades.  However, weather-related quality issues such as bleaching and sprouting remain a concern in many areas.  While overall yields are reported to be about average, they vary from region to region.

The Ministry of Agriculture has a Forage, Feed and Custom Service listing for producers to advertise and source feed products.  It is available at www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/FeedForageListing.

Farmers are busy with harvest operations and hauling bales.

 

-30-

 

For more information, contact:

Shannon Friesen

 Agriculture

Moose Jaw

Phone: 306-694-3592

Email: shannon.friesen@gov.sk.ca

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Saskatchewan yields and grades are average


Written By: Eric Anderson, Sep 09, 2015

Last week’s crop report (here https://www.saskatchewan.ca/~/media/news%20release%20backgrounders/2015/sep/crop%20report%20for%20the%20period%20august%2025%20to%2031.pdf ) contains the phrase “Overall, producers are indicating that yields and grades are average” in every district’s report, then follows with some higher or lower.

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Manitoba crops - average to above average


Written By: Eric Anderson, Sep 09, 2015

Crop Report: Issue 19, September 08, 2015 

Weekly Provincial Summary 

  •  Harvest 2015 continued across Manitoba over the past week, but wet weather over the weekend temporarily halted harvest progress.
  • Harvest operations have since resumed in areas that received lower rainfall amounts and where field conditions allowed.
  • Winter wheat seeding is underway in the Central and Eastern Regions of Manitoba.
  • Fall field work, including tillage, baling of straw, and soil testing is on-going.

 

Southwest Region

Thundershower activity in some areas of the Southwest Region slowed harvest progress over the week and into the weekend. Rainfall amounts were variable; Shoal Lake and Oakburn areas recorded over 100 mm of precipitation while most other areas received 15 to 50 mm.

 

The spring cereal harvest in the Southwest Region ranges from 20 to 70% complete, with the slowest progress noted in the more northern areas. Early spring wheat and barley yields continue to be reported at above long term averages. Quality loss is now being noted in all spring cereals due to staining and sprouting. There are some reports of lodging issues, with differences observed between spring wheat varieties.

 

Canola crop maturities advanced with the earliest canola fields having been swathed, while most later and reseeded fields are being swathed. The canola harvest has, for the most part, not yet begun in the northern parts of the region. Some producers tried to harvest canola but very little has been done. There are green seed issues where swathing occurred during high temperatures. In some fields canola is testing dry to almost dry, but stalks remain tough.

 

Soybean growth and maturity continue to advance with maturities in the R6.5 (seed fill to capacity) to R7 (pod and leaf yellowing) stage of development. Sunflowers are in the R6 to R7 stage. Corn is in the R4 to R5 stage.

 

The field pea harvest is complete with most yields at above long term averages. Flax fields continue to dry down with little evidence of any significant disease issues.

 

Second cut alfalfa continues to be harvested with yields average to above average. Greenfeed silage continues to be harvested with average to above average yields. Recent rains helped pastures as most are in fair to good condition depending on management. Some cut hay and greenfeed quality will be impacted by the recent rainfall. Water levels in dugouts are at 85 to 90% of capacity.

 

Northwest Region

Harvest operations in the Northwest Region moved forward until the weekend when unsettled weather stalled harvest progress. Rainfall amounts of 12 to 51 mm are reported from most parts of the region. Soil moisture conditions are adequate in most parts and excessive in some localized areas.

 

Overall, harvest is about 40% complete for the Northwest Region. The wheat harvest is approximately 95% complete. Hard red spring wheat yields are extremely variable and range from 25 to 70 bu/acre. Most reports on wheat quality range between #1 and #2.

 

Overall, approximately 50% of the canola crop is swathed in the Northwest Region. Early seeded canola crops are mostly swathed, while much of the later seeded canola will be swathed over the coming week weather permitting. Approximately 15% of the canola crop is combined, with most progress made around the Dauphin area.

 

Approximately 25% of the corn crop is at the blister stage of growth, 50% is at the milk stage, and 25% at the dough stage. All soybean acres are podded. About 85% of the flax crop is at the boll stage of growth and 15% is mature.
In many cases, fall field work operations are caught up to harvest.

 

Haying is wrapping up in the North Parkland and Valleys North areas. Some producers will be harvesting second cut after the first frost. Last week’s high humidity and small showers throughout the area delayed finishing harvest. Many producers are contemplating corn harvest for silage, but most likely will not begin for a few more weeks due to stage of development. Pastures are slowing down rapidly in growth but water supplies are adequate.

 

Central Region

In the Central Region, temperatures continued to range from high 20s to mid 30s for the early part of the week, dropping to more seasonal values on Friday and through the weekend. Rainfall accumulations were heavy in the east half of the region, with much of the area reporting 60 to 90 mm. There is standing water in many fields due to the heavy rains, and field work will be at a standstill for most of this week. Western areas of the region received 10 to 35 mm, increasing from west to east.

 

Excellent harvest progress was made in many areas of the region where possible this past week, until showers started on Friday. Swathing of canola continues and combining started up again on Monday in areas of lowest rainfall. Many producers continue to select fields for harvest, limited often by wet conditions. Grain drying and aeration is occurring to bring harvested grain to safe storage moisture levels.

 

Cereal crop harvest ranges from 80 to 100% complete. Quality of cereals remaining in the field is declining, with downgrading due to mildew and sprouting.

 

There is a wide range in canola development, with swathing continuing. Combining of canola is well underway, ranging from 45 to as much as 90% complete. More canola is being straight cut, with positive results to date. The lodged crop resisted shattering losses from recent strong winds. Early yield reports are variable, with the best looking stands yielding in the 40 to 50 bu/acre range, while the fields that struggled with excess rain are as low as 10 to 15 bu/acre.

 

The backs of the heads of earliest seeded sunflowers‎ are yellow, and bracts are brown; desiccation will likely start this week.

 

Edible bean harvest is underway with yields reported as average. There are a few soybeans fields that reached 95% brown (mature) in eastern areas. Soybean harvest will begin when fields dry up; on lighter soils that could be later this week. Pea fields are mostly ripe and many are already harvested. Some harvest is delayed due to wet field conditions. Early yield reports in the 45 to 50 bu/acre range.

 

Some flax has been harvested; the few yield reports to date range from 18 to 25 bu/acre.

 

There is good regrowth of perennial weeds post-harvest, allowing for control measures to be made in preparation for next year’s crops.

 

Fall tillage is underway. Many were waiting for rain before starting due to the dry topsoil conditions. Soil testing has begun.

 

Fall rye and winter wheat is being seeded, some in advance of the previous weekend rains. Additional acres will be seeded into good soil moisture.


Hay harvest is mostly complete for second cut in southern areas, with reasonable yield and quality. A third cut in the southern areas may be possible. The wettest areas in the northwest part of the region report poor quality second cut hay. Most of the remainder of second cut hay is being delayed to avoid cutting during the critical fall period. Low lying areas and sloughs are being cut for feed ‎where access is possible. There is still decent forage growth on most pastures. Pastures are rated in good to fair condition.

 

Eastern Region

In the Eastern Region, the weather last week was hot and humid until the weekend when temperatures dropped as significant rainfall occurred on Friday and Saturday. Rainfall accumulations for the week across the region ranged from 25 to 80 mm with most occurring on the weekend; accumulation levels were highest in central and southern districts. Weekend rains halted harvesting and field work in all districts, although limited progress was made on Monday in a few drier fields in some northern areas. Northernmost districts in the Eastern Region have made little harvesting progress so far this season. Standing water in field low spots is still evident throughout the region.

 

Spring wheat harvest is 85% complete with an average yield of 55 bu/acre and average quality. About 60% of the oat crop is harvested with an average yield of 110 bu/acre and average quality. About 50% of the canola is harvested with an average yield of 40 bu/acre and average quality.

 

Soybeans are in the late R6 to mid R7 growth stages. Sunflowers are in the R8 and R9 growth stages and desiccation has occurred in some fields. Corn is in the dent (R5) growth stage. Recent hot weather accelerated maturity progress in long seasoned crops. Frequent rainfall and increased humidity levels resulted in head rot symptoms in sunflower crops.

 

Some seeding of winter wheat occurred as canola stubble becomes available and soil conditions allow for field operations.


Pasture conditions are rated at 60% good, 20% fair and 20% poor. Some third cut alfalfa is coming off while some producers are having a challenge putting up first cut grass hay. Pastures are in overall good condition with low spots under water. Currently, hay supplies are rated at 20% surplus and 80% adequate. Straw, greenfeed and feed grain supplies are all rated as adequate. Availability of livestock water is also adequate and dugouts are full.

 

Interlake Region

Warm and humid conditions were experienced throughout the Interlake Region last week. The weather conditions however did bring a weather system with precipitation and strong winds during the weekend period. Isolated storms resulted in rainfall amounts over 40 mm in the Moosehorn and Woodlands region. Most other parts of the region received 15 to 35 mm of rainfall. Wet conditions made travelling across many fields in the south Interlake quite difficult as producers try to continue harvesting.

 

Harvesting is estimated to be 35 to 55% completed. South Interlake is further ahead of harvesting than the North Interlake. Harvest progress has slowed due to weather conditions. Last week, producers continued to harvest canola and spring cereals. Due to the tough moisture levels, producers are using both grain bin aeration as well as grain dryers to manage moisture levels in their harvested grains.

 

Canola continues to be swathed and harvested throughout the region. Some fields that were desiccated for straight cutting have been left standing for over 15 to 18 days.

 

Soybean leaves have started to change color and drop. Flax crops are starting to mature. Corn and sunflowers continue to mature.

 

Some of the early harvested fields have been cultivated.

 

The variable showers throughout the region last week hampered haying operations. Most greenfeed crops are harvested, and good yields are reported in second cut hay. Corn has yet to be silaged, but yields look promising.

 

Desiccation of the alfalfa seed crops is continuing.

 

Pastures are still holding out well due to intermittent rains during the past several weeks.

 

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Manitoba crop report August 31


Written By: Eric Anderson, Sep 01, 2015

Crop Report: Issue 18, August 2431, 2015

Weekly Provincial Summary 

  • Sporadic rainfall and high humidity levels slowed harvest progress and haying operations across Manitoba.  The recent weather is also resulting in quality loss in some crop types.
  • A strong weather system passed through several areas of the Central Region the morning of August 28.  Heavy rains and small to large-sized hail resulted in varying amounts of crop damage.
  • Harvest of winter cereals is complete with average to above average yields and good quality.
  • Spring wheat, barley, oats, canola and field pea harvest continues as field and weather conditions allow.
  • Minimal acres of winter wheat and fall rye are seeded to date.
 

Southwest Region

In the Southwest Region, little to no rainfall over the past week helped producers continue with harvest. Rainfall amounts did vary with the majority of the rain coming on Thursday evening in scattered thundershowers. Rainfall amounts for the week ranged from 5 to 25 mm.

Harvest progress varies throughout the Southwest Region. In the south and southwest areas of the region, harvest is 50 to 60% complete. In areas north of Highway #1, harvest is approximately 30% complete with approximately 10% of the spring wheat crop harvested, and the majority of barley acres harvested.  Harvest of winter cereals is complete across the region.

Winter cereal yields are average to slightly above average, and good quality. Spring wheat yields are average to above average with good quality. Barley yields are also reported as average to slightly above average with good quality.

Canola that wasn’t reseeded because of spring frosts is swathed. Some canola has been harvested, with reports of average yields and higher levels of disease in some of the earlier crop.  Reseeded canola is starting to be cut and majority of the crop will be ready to be cut by the end of the week.

The soybean crop is advancing well and recent rains will help crop in the later stages of development. Most of the crop is in the R6 stage with some of the early crop beginning maturity. Sunflowers are in the R6 stage with early seeded sunflowers in the R7 stage. Reports of heavy disease pressure in some areas. Most corn is in the grain filling stages, ranging from R2 to R3. Flax is turning with the odd early field being desiccated.

Pastures benefited from recent rains; however, overgrazed pastures may be under pressure to make the month of September for grazing. Silage of cereal crops is being done and yields are average to above average. Second cut hay is being done with most areas reporting average yields and good quality. Dugouts are about 80% full.
 

Northwest Region

Harvest operations in the Northwest Region moved ahead slowly over the past week. High humidity and heavy dew in the mornings, along with light sporadic showers, contributed to the slow harvest progress. Early seeded canola crops that were not reseeded because of frost are being swathed. Reseeded canola fields are at least ten days away from swathing. In many cases, fall field work operations are caught up to harvest. Soil moisture conditions are adequate in most parts of the region and excessive in some localized areas.

The wheat harvest is the furthest advanced at this point in the region; estimated 70% of the hard red wheat crop is combined. Reported hard red spring wheat yields are extremely variable and range from 25 to 70 bu/acre. Very little canola has been harvested. Approximately 40% of the canola crop has been swathed.

Approximately 45% of the corn crop is in the blister stage of growth, 50% is at milk stage, and 5% at dough stage. For soybeans, 100% of the crop is podded. About 85% of the flax crop is at the boll stage of growth and 15% is mature.
Rain in many areas late Sunday evening has halted haying, greenfeed and silage operations. Harvest will resume once weather and field conditions allow. Second cut hay harvest saw average yields and native hay will continue to be harvested. Cereal silage is complete showing average yields. Water supplies are adequate in most parts of the region.
 

Central Region

The Central Region saw normal to above normal temperatures during the week with minimal precipitation accumulations.  However, on Friday morning a strong weather system moved through some areas of the region. Large hail was reported through the Altona and Plum Coulee areas; hail fell for up to fifteen minutes with stones ranging from marble to baseball in size.  Hail was also reported in other areas including St.Claude, Glenboro to Rathwell, south of Carman, and from Miami to Winkler. Damage occurred to crops such as corn, edible beans, soybeans and canola. Rainfall amounts up to 33 mm were also associated with the system.

Harvest had resumed early to mid-week after the previous weekends’ rain/cool conditions, but field activity was limited with heavy dews and high relative humidity through the week. Smoky conditions resulting from forest fires in Washington State moderated temperatures but did prolong drying of morning dews. Producers are limited by wet conditions when selecting fields for harvest. Artificial grain drying and aeration is occurring as some grain is being harvest at tough moisture levels.
Cereal crop harvest has progressed and is starting to wind down. Progress is slow in lodged fields. Wheat harvest is 40 to 90% completed with the Red River Valley the most advanced. Fusarium head blight levels are reported to be generally low in both winter and spring wheat, and quality is generally good. Quality of the wheat remaining in the field is declining, with downgrading due to mildew and sprouting.

Much of the canola crop is swathed. Combining of canola is well underway in the Red River Valley, with progress estimated at 60% complete. More canola is being straight cut, with positive results to date. Early yield reports are variable, with the best looking stands yielding in the 40 to 50 bu/acre range, to yields as low as 10 to 15 bu/acre.

Field pea harvest is delayed due to wet field conditions.  Early yield reports are in the 45 bu/acre range.  Flax is at the boll stage and starting to turn. There is limited swathing or harvesting done, although some fields are complete in the Roland area. No yield reports to date.

The back of the heads of earliest seeded sunflowers‎ are yellow; desiccation may start in ten days to two weeks. The most recent rains will benefit corn. Most soybean fields are finished flowering. Some of the earliest seeded fields are seeing leaf colour change. Edible beans are starting to turn; some fields have been cut with minimal acres harvested to date.
Some fields have been cultivated, following harvest. Soil testing has begun.

The second cut hay harvest is mostly complete in the southern areas, with reasonable yield and quality. The wettest areas in the northwest report poor quality second cut hay, which is still being harvested. Some fields are not advanced enough to take another cut, and producers are waiting to see if there will be enough growth to warrant that second operation. Low lying areas and sloughs are being cut for feed ‎where access is possible. Pastures are rated in good to fair condition.
 

Eastern Region

In the Eastern Region, the weather last week was very humid with temperatures climbing from seasonal to hot as the week progressed. With localized rainfall events throughout the week and on the weekend, harvest progress was limited. Some harvesting resumed on Wednesday or Thursday in districts where field access was possible. Some field rutting is noted and standing water in field low spots is also still evident throughout the region. The precipitation may impact quality of crops. Warm season crops are showing signs of excess moisture stress in some fields.

Winter wheat harvesting is complete with an average yield of 70 bu/acre and average quality. Spring wheat harvest is 75% complete with an average yield of 60 bu/acre with average quality. About 40% of the oat crop is harvested with an average yield of 110 bu/acre with average quality. About 35% of the canola is harvested with an average yield of 45 bu/acre with average quality. Soybeans are in the R6 growth stage. Sunflowers are in the R7 growth stage with corn in the milk (R3) growth stage.

Pasture conditions are rated at 80% good, 10% fair and 10% poor. There still are hay swaths laying in wet field conditions and dry weather is needed for producers to resume haying. Most producers have their straw baled. Pastures benefited from the rains. Livestock are starting to graze hay fields that were cut earlier. Currently, hay supplies are rated at 20% surplus and 80% adequate. Straw, greenfeed and feed grain supplies are all rated as adequate. Availability of livestock water is also adequate and dugouts are full.
 

Interlake Region

Hot temperatures and humid conditions delayed harvest in many parts of the Interlake Region. Scattered showers earlier in the week brought 5 to 25 mm of rainfall to the region. Damage from last week’s hail storm in Teulon ranged from 10 to 90% hail damage, depending on individual fields.

Spring cereal harvest is slow due to wet, humid conditions. Harvesting of cereals is estimated to be 45 to 50% complete with many acres in the North Interlake remaining to be harvested. Canola continues to be harvested and swathed. Combining is slow due to wet field conditions in the Teulon and Selkirk areas.

Earlier seeded soybeans finished flowering and are starting to change color. The number of aphids decreased significantly making an insecticide spray not needed. Corn is in the blister (R2) stage and sunflowers are in the R6 to R7 stage.
Recent rains stalled haying operations. However, pastures benefitted and second growth on hayfields looks good. There is also reduced grasshopper and alfalfa weevil damage due to the intermittent rains. Progress is being made with ensiling of greenfeed crops. Silage corn looks good.
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Alberta Crop Conditions as of August 25, 2015 - yields 76%-83% of normal


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 28, 2015

Alberta Crop Conditions as of August 25, 2015

Showers or rain was reported in virtually all areas of the province last week affecting harvest progress. Harvest is estimated at slightly less than 10% complete with an additional 12% in the swath, up from 6% combined and 6% swathed the prior week. The 5 year average for this date is 11% swathed and 4% combined. Frost was reported in northern regions in the August 21-22 time period. Damage is yet to be determined but most crops should be beyond the stage for significant damage to be expected with the possible exception of canola. Crop yield estimates continue to improve as more harvest information becomes available. Yield averages improved in 4 of the 5 regions with the Peace being the only region to decline. Yield estimates improved significantly in the North West region which is the region most affected by the dry conditions. Second growth is a significant problem for producers this year. Decisions will be required whether to wait, swath now or desiccate.

Provincial soil moisture ratings improved for both surface and sub soil ratings. Surface moisture improved 3 points to 39% rated good or excellent. Significant improvements were reported in South and Central regions. Subsoil moisture improved 2 points to 34% rated good or excellent with good improvements in the South and North East regions off set somewhat by marginal declines in the North West and Peace regions.

Hay and pasture ratings showed a slight improvement to 19% of the province rated good or excellent. Ratings were higher in the South and Central regions and little changed in the remainder of the province. Current provincial ratings are: 42% Poor (- 1); 39% Fair (no change); 19% Good (+ 2); < 1% Excellent (no change). Approximately 55% of the province indicates there will be a 2nd cut dryland hay crop. Currently, 16% of the 2nd cut dryland crop and 65% of the 2nd cut irrigated crop is baled.




Regional Assessments:
The 2015 Alberta Crop Report Series provides summaries for the following five regions:

Region One: Southern (Strathmore, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat, Foremost)

  • Showers slowed harvest operations. Heavier rains received in west portion of the region.
  • 17% of crop swathed; 24% harvested (+ 4 percentage points for the week).
  • Regional yield estimates improved to 76.3% of the 5 year average. Improved yield estimates for spring wheat, durum, barley, oats and field peas. Yield estimates declined minimally for canola (- 0.1 bu/acre).
  • Surface soil moisture ratings improved to 36% good or excellent (+ 7 points); sub soil moisture improved to 30% good or excellent (+ 3 percentage points).
  • Hay and pastures improved with 47% rated poor (- 4 points) and 14% rated good or excellent (+ 2 points).

Region Two: Central (Rimbey, Airdrie, Coronation, Oyen)

  • Fairly general rain across the region with heavier amounts in the west.
  • 9% of crop swathed; 4% harvested (+ 2 percentage points for the week).
  • Regional yield estimates improved to 80.2% of the 5 year average. Yield estimates improved for all crops except durum which was unchanged. Barley and oat estimates increased 2 bushels/acre, canola, peas and spring wheat estimates increased 1 bushel/acre.
  • Surface soil moisture improved to 59% rated good or excellent (+ 4 points). Sub soil moisture improved by 1 percentage point to 50% rated good or excellent.
  • Hay/pasture ratings showed significant improvement with a 2 point decline in the Poor rating to 33% and with a 5 point increase to the good or excellent rating to 28%.

Region Three: North East (Smoky Lake, Vermilion, Camrose, Provost)

  • Showers reported in much of the region with light rain in the east portion along the Saskatchewan border. Light frost reported in western portion of the region.
  • 5% of crop swathed; 3% harvested (+ 2.5 percentage points for the week).
  • Regional yield estimates increased to 78.0% of the 5 year average. Estimates improved for all crops by 1 bushel/acre.
  • Surface soil moisture ratings improved by 2 points to 41% rated good or excellent. Sub soil ratings are 37% rated good or excellent (up 6 points).
  • Pasture/hay ratings unchanged at 23% rated good or excellent.

Region Four: North West (Barrhead, Edmonton, Leduc, Drayton Valley, Athabasca)

  • Light showers reported throughout the region. Frost reported in many areas.
  • 5% of crops swathed; 5% harvested (+ 4 percentage points for the week).
  • Regional yield estimates are significantly higher than previously reported at 76.9% of the 5 year average yield (previously 69.4%). Yield estimates increased 4 – 6 bushels/acre with barley the exception with 1 bushel decline.
  • Surface soil moisture improved marginally with less than 1 point increase to 19% good or excellent. Sub soil moisture ratings declined to 15% good or excellent (- 3 points).
  • Pasture/hay ratings were virtually unchanged with 11% of region rated good or excellent.

Region Five: Peace River (Fairview, Falher, Grande Prairie, Valleyview)

  • Region received variable precipitation from light, spotty showers to 50 mm of rain. Heavy frost reported.
  • 23% of crops swathed; 6% combined (+ 4 percentage points for the week).
  • Regional yield estimates declined marginally to 83.1% of 5 year yield average. Yield estimates declined by approximately 0.5 bushels/acre. The exception was field pea yield which increased approximately 1 bushel/acre.
  • Surface and sub soil moisture ratings were reported as unchanged at 26% rated good or excellent.
  • Pasture/hay ratings declined 1 percentage point to 15% rated good or excellent.

 

 

 

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Saskatchewan crop report - harvest ahead of schedule


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 27, 2015

Producers across the province now have 16 per cent of the 2015 crop combined and 19 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report.  The five-year (2010-2014) average for this time of the year is six per cent combined and 14 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Regionally, producers in the southwest have 33 per cent of the crop combined, while those in the southeast have 27 per cent combined.  Eight per cent of the crop is combined in the west-central region, three per cent in the east-central and northwestern regions, and two per cent in the northeast.

Rainfall and cool temperatures during the week caused some delays in harvesting.  Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to two and a half inches in some areas.  Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as seven per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate, 11 per cent short and one per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate, 19 per cent short and five per cent very short.

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Manitoba crop yield average or above average


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 26, 2015

MB Crop Report

Issue 17, August 24, 2015

 

 

Weekly Provincial Summary 

•Good harvest progress was made in Manitoba throughout the week due to moderate temperatures and dry conditions. To date, yields of winter and spring wheat, barley, oats and canola are average to above average. Good quality is also noted.

•However, a weather system passed through several areas of Manitoba over the weekend that resulted in a wide range of precipitation amounts and strong winds, along with hail in isolated areas.

•Harvest operations are halted and will resume once weather and field conditions allow.

•The precipitation will benefit later maturing crops, as well as hay fields and pastures.

 

Southwest Region

In the Southwest Region, scattered showers in some areas slowed harvest progress through the week. Over the weekend, rainfall amounts ranged from 15 to 40 mm with some areas reporting as high as 75 mm.

 

The winter cereal harvest is nearing completion with generally average to slightly above average yields and quality. Spring cereals are in the final stages of maturity. Spring wheat and barley swathing and preharvest applications are on-going. Some initial harvesting operations have started and early spring wheat and barley yields are above long term averages.

 

Canola crop maturity has advanced with the earliest canola fields being swathed. Most reseeded fields are fully podded and beginning to dry down. Disease levels in both early and later seeded canola continue to be minimal. There are some difficulties in swathing due to lodging.

 

Most field peas have been desiccated or swathed with a significant percentage harvested; yields are above long term averages. Flax fields are maturing with no disease issues reported. Weed pressure is high in some flax fields.

 

Corn and sunflowers are doing well with no production issues currently noted. Soybean growth and maturity slowed over this past week with maturities in the full R5 (seed set) to early R6 (pod filling) stage of development. Some fields that have missed recent thundershowers are beginning to show symptoms of moisture stress and premature dry down.

 

Some areas in the region have seen a start to second cut alfalfa with yields average to above average and variable to good quality depending upon rainfall. Greenfeed silage is being harvested with average to above average yields reported. Pastures that were overgrazed in spring remain in poor condition due to reduced regrowth. Water levels in dugouts range from 75 to 90% of capacity, depending on the area.

 

Northwest Region

Harvest was interrupted mid-week when thunderstorm activity resulted in random rain showers through parts of the Northwest Region. Unsettled weather also continued through the weekend. Rainfall amounts ranged from 0 to over 25 mm depending on location. There was hail reported in the southern part of the Swan Valley late in the week. The resulting damage to field crops has not yet been determined. Soil moisture conditions are adequate in most parts of the region and excessive in some localized areas that received heavy downpours.

 

Wheat harvest is the furthest advanced in the region. Approximately 40% of the winter wheat crop has been harvested. It is estimated that 20% of the hard red wheat crop has been combined. Reported yields are extremely variable and range from 20 to 70 bu/acre. About 30% of the spring wheat crop is in the dough stage and 70% is mature. Preharvest treatments are nearing completion.

 

The canola crop continues to improve and develop rapidly. Approximately 90% of the canola crop is podded with about 10% mature.

 

Approximately 10% of the corn crop is tasseling, 80% is at the blister stage of growth and 10% is at the milk stage. In soybeans, 100% of the crop is podded. In flax, 95% of the flax crop is at the boll stage of growth and 5% is mature.

 

Rain over the weekend has halted haying and silage operations. Second cut harvest is seeing average yields and native hay is also being harvested. Some late seeded annual crops intended for grain are being considered for silage harvest or greenfeed. The recent rainfall was welcome for pasture growth. Water supplies are adequate.

 

Central Region

In the Central Region, moderate to cool temperatures for the week allowed for good harvest progress. However, rainfall impacted the whole region on the weekend with precipitation amounts ranging from almost none along the south central part of the region to as much as 85 mm on the eastern side. The precipitation was welcome for the later maturing crops like soybeans and corn, including some acres that were showing symptoms of moisture stress. However, wet field conditions in some areas will impact harvest operations. Fields in the northern part of the region are soft and more difficult to access with machinery. Strong winds were also reported during the day on Sunday but there are no reports to date of significant crop damage.

 

Cereal crop harvest has progressed. Wheat harvest is reported at 40 to 80% complete with the Red River Valley being the most advanced. Harvest of winter wheat and fall rye is almost complete. Yields of winter wheat are reported in the 55 to 90 bu/acre range; average is expected to be in the 65 to 75 bu/acre range. Spring wheat harvest continues, with higher yields in the general purpose/feed wheat varieties. Quality is generally good, but variability is noted due to lodging. Red spring wheat protein contents are ranging from 12 to 15%, while general purpose/feed wheat ranges from 11 to 13%. Harvest management applications continue in spring wheat fields.

 

There is a wide range in canola development due to the varied seeding dates. Combining of canola is well underway in the Red River Valley with as much as 40% of the crop harvested. Most canola fields on the escarpment are just being swathed as a result of late spring frost and reseeding. Early yield reports are variable, with the best looking fields yielding 40 to 50 bu/acre, while fields that struggled are as low as 30 bu/acre.

 

Sunflowers are still flowering; monitoring continues for insects. Sunflower beetle numbers are low, while lygus bug numbers are at threshold levels or higher, and most fields are sprayed. Corn has benefitted from the recent rain. Most soybean fields are finished flowering. Some fields in the Red River Valley are showing increasing symptoms due to excess moisture and subsequent root rots. Conversely, fields on the west side of the escarpment were showing signs of moisture stress and should benefit from the weekend rain. Some of the earliest seeded fields are seeing leaf colour change. Reports of soybean aphids have not increased, and most fields are well below threshold level; only the odd field required an insecticide application.

 

Edible beans are starting to turn indicating advanced maturity stage and some fields are being cut. Pea fields are mature and many are already harvested. Harvesting of some fields is being delayed due to wet field conditions.

Some fields have been cultivated, following harvest.

 

Second cut hay harvest is mostly complete. The wettest areas in the northwest part of the region report poor quality second cut; some is not advanced enough to take another cut and producers are waiting to see if there will be enough growth to warrant a second cut. Low lying areas and sloughs are being cut for feed when producers are able to access them. Pastures are rated good to fair.

 

Eastern Region

In the Eastern Region, weather early in the week was mostly sunny with cooler temperatures. Warmer weather returned as the week progressed. However, on Friday and into the weekend, thunderstorms resulted in precipitation ranging from 25 mm to 178 mm, with the most impacted areas north of Caliento to Sandilands, east of Vita and Beausejour. Oakbank, Stead and Winnipeg Beach areas also received hail.

 

Winter wheat harvesting is 90% complete overall with most fields in central and northern districts completed with an average yield of 70 bu/acre and average quality. Spring wheat harvest is 50% complete with the greatest progress in central and northern districts and an average yield of 60 bu/acre with average quality. Thus far, reported protein levels range from 13 to 15% and low fusarium damaged kernel levels. About 25% of the oat crop is harvested with an average yield of 110 bu/acre with average quality. About 10% of the canola is harvested with an average yield of 55 bu/acre with average quality. Swathing or preharvest herbicide applications in canola are in full swing as the crop is maturing quickly.

 

Soybeans are primarily in the R6 growth stage. Sunflowers are in R6 to R7 growth stages with corn in the blister (R2) growth stage.

 

Pasture conditions are rated at 80% good, 10% fair and 10% poor. Haying is in full swing with 90% of the greenfeed and native hay harvested. Some producers are still dealing with wet hay fields. Some spring cereal crops that were recently damaged by hail are being baled for feed. Currently, hay supplies are rated at 20% surplus and 80% adequate. Straw, greenfeed and feed grain supplies are all rated as adequate. Availability of livestock water is also adequate.

 

Interlake Region

Cool, dry conditions were experienced throughout the Interlake Region early last week. During Friday evening and Saturday morning, heavy rainfall occurred. Rainfall amounts varied throughout the Interlake Region, ranging from 15 to 80 mm; Eriksdale, Selkirk and Teulon received 50 to 80 mm of rainfall during the weekend. Pea sized hail was also reported in the Teulon area; shattering in canola occurred as a result. For areas that received heavy rainfall, field travel will be impacted and will slow down the progress of harvest.

 

Harvest is estimated at 10 to 15% complete. Harvesting of spring cereals and canola fields occurred during week. Reports of spring wheat yields ranging from 50 to 75 bu/acre with protein levels around 14.0%. Oat yields range from 100 to 115 bu/acre. Canola yields range from 35 to 40 bu/acre.

 

Harvesting of most forage grass seed fields is complete. Soybeans are in the R6 growth stage, corn is in the blister (R2) stage and sunflowers in the R6 to R7 stage.

 

Cooler temperatures and scattered showers brought a reprieve from the grasshopper pressure in pastures and weevil damage in hay fields. Pastures are holding out fairly well. Greenfeed and silage harvest is in full swing with average yields.

 

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Higher-quality wheat likely in store for Prairies


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 26, 2015

CNS is reporting that  . . .

Western Canadian farmers are seeing higher-quality wheat crops this year, which would help meet pent-up demand for quality within the market.

However, producers might not reap the rewards as much as they would like, one market analyst warns.

Wheat buyers will be looking for better-quality and higher-protein wheat, since Canada disappointed on some of those fronts last year, said Neil Townsend, director of market research at G3 Global Grains in Winnipeg.

 

See full story at http://www.agcanada.com/daily/higher-quality-wheat-likely-in-store-for-prairies

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Overall crop conditions still improving


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 25, 2015

The imagery from the Crop Condition Assessment Program shows continued crop improvement.  The August 23rd image displays most regions approaching "normal."   An image from August 9th shows a much large and consistent "brown" or "below normal area." in Alberta.  Going back to July 6th, most of the prairies was "brown" or "below normal."

 

 

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Manitoba crop report August 10


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 10, 2015

The gov't of Manitoba released today . . .

Manitoba Crop Report: Issue 15, August 10, 2015

 

 

Weekly Provincial Summary 

  • The 2015 harvest was slowed by the continuing wet conditions in Manitoba. However, some harvest operations did occur where field and weather conditions allowed.
  • Winter wheat yields are ranging from 55 to 90 bushels per acre, with good quality.
  • Swathing or preharvest management of the earliest-seeded spring cereal and canola crops continues.
  • The return to warmer and drier weather conditions is welcome to aid in ripening of spring crops, continued growth in the warm season crops such as grain corn, sunflowers, edible beans and soybeans, and harvest operations.

 

Southwest Region

In the Southwest Region, moderate temperatures and scattered thundershowers allowed for continued crop development as the 2015 crop approaches maturity. Rainfall amounts ranged from 15 to 50 mm and were fairly general across the region.

 

Most winter cereals are in the firm to hard dough stage of development; some fields in the more southern areas of the region are harvested with average yields reported. Early seeded spring wheat is in the soft dough stage and approaching recommended stages for preharvest applications, while some barley crops are being swathed. Symptoms of fusarium head blight can be seen in unsprayed fields of spring wheat. Leaf diseases are also visible.

 

Canola responded favourably to the moderate temperatures and recent rainfall. The most advanced canola fields are in the pod fill stage while most re-seeded fields are completing flowering. Disease levels in the early seeded canola appear to be at relatively low levels.

 

Most pea fields are beginning to dry down with some fields having preharvest products applied. Initial field pea harvest has begun on a few early fields with yields in the 40 to 50 bu/ac range. Flax fields are coming out of flower and have experienced some lodging after the recent rainfall.

 

Soybeans continue to respond to the recent rains and excellent growing conditions; majority of crops are into the R4 (full pod) to early R5 (beginning seed) stage of development. There are some reports of aphids in soybeans but the populations are below thresholds. Sunflowers are at full flower stage and corn is in the early grain filling stages.

 

First cut alfalfa and alfalfa/grass hay harvest have seen further deterioration with frequent showers and high humidity experienced early last week. First cut yields continue to be reported at 50 to 75% of long term averages. First cut is mostly complete and native hay is nearing completion as well. Some initial second cut alfalfa is harvested with yields average to above average with good quality. Greenfeed silage is harvested with average to above average yields reported. In the areas that received moisture, pastures are remaining productive. ‎ Water levels in sloughs and dugout have rebounded and are at 80 to 85% of capacity.

 

Northwest Region

A major weather system moving through most of the Northwest Region over the past week resulted in amounts of at least 10 mm to over 50 mm of rain in localized areas. Soil moisture conditions are adequate in most parts of the region and excessive in some localized spots. Crops in the region are reported to be in good to poor condition. Some crops lodged as a result of the heavy rains and winds experienced over the week, especially canola. Harvest operations were at a standstill for most of the week.

 

Approximately 10% of the winter wheat crop is in the dough stage of growth and 90% is mature. About 5% of the spring wheat crop is at the milk stage, 90% in the dough stage and 5% is mature. Preharvest treatments have begun as conditions allow.

 

The canola crop continues to improve and develop rapidly. Approximately 15% of the canola crop is at some stage of bloom while about 85% is podded.

 

Approximately 90% of the corn crop is in the V6 to V13 stage of growth and 10% is tasseling. For soybeans, 10% of the crop is flowering while about 90% is podded. About 25% of the flax crop is flowering with the remaining 75% at the boll stage of growth.

 

Crop insect pest activity throughout the region continues to be low.

 

Haying operations were delayed over the past week due to spotty showers. Harvest of cereals for greenfeed and silage has begun and will continue with the better weather forecast for this week. Pastures are in good condition with adequate moisture. Water supplies on pasture are good. 

 

Central Region

In the Central Region, moderate temperatures and humid weather conditions continued through the week, with warmer temperatures on the weekend. Unsettled conditions resulted in showers and thundershowers and rainfall amounts varied from a few millimetres to 60 mm. Most areas have adequate moisture for excellent growing conditions. Lodging is prevalent in cereals and some canola fields, and sunflowers where poor root systems were a result of prolonged wet conditions.

 

Cereal crops throughout the region look good. Harvest will be a challenge in many spring wheat fields due to lodging, and yield loss of some degree is expected. Fusarium head blight levels appear to be much lower than last year in both winter and spring wheat.

 

Harvest of winter wheat and fall rye has begun; much of the crop is harvested in the eastern part of the region. Early yields of winter wheat are reported in the 55 to 90 bu/ac range; average is expected to be in the 65 to 75 bu/ac range, with decent quality in most cases. Some spring wheat was harvested; no yield reports to date. Harvest management applications continue in spring wheat fields. Some fields are soft, as lodged crop is preventing good drying conditions.

 

There is a wide range in canola development due to the varied seeding dates. Reseeded canola fields from the late May frost are close to flower completion. Significant progress has been made in swathing in the eastern part of the region, with 25 to 40% of fields swathed. Swathing will become more widespread throughout the region this week. Many fields are lodged due to heavy winds, and harvest will be a struggle.

 

Sunflowers are growing well and are flowering. Monitoring continues for insects, and staging is being done for fungicide application. Sunflower beetle numbers are low; lygus numbers are at threshold levels and higher, and most fields have been sprayed. Corn is growing rapidly and fields are into grain filling stages of development.

 

Soybeans continue to flower and form pods. Some fields are showing increasing damage due to excess moisture and subsequent root rots. Reports of soybean aphids are becoming more common, and while most fields are below economic threshold, the odd field is at the 250 aphids/plant and increasing, and will be sprayed. Beneficial insects are easily found in most fields, and are keeping pest populations in check.

 

Edible beans are flowering and podding. With recent heavy rains, some fields are showing stress symptoms of yellowing. Overall most fields look good.  Pea fields are starting to mature; some are ready to harvest, but are being delayed where field conditions are wet.

 

Hay harvest continues but has been difficult with the high humidity and recent rains. Second alfalfa hay cut is occurring with reasonably good yields. Greenfeed is also being cut for forage. Pastures have good growth due to abundant rain and warmer temperatures. Some areas would benefit from additional rain.

 

Eastern Region

In the Eastern Region, the weather during the previous week was highly variable. Rainfall accumulations ranged from 15 to 40 mm. The week had normal to below normal temperatures with some cool evenings. Some isolated hailstorms occurred in the southern districts of the region. Across the Eastern Region, fields continue to show evidence of standing water and areas where crop is drowned out and is more prevalent in central and southern districts. Low areas in fields that have been harvested are showing some rutting from machinery. Soil moisture conditions on crop land are rated as adequate to surplus.

 

Spring cereal crops are in the soft to hard dough growth stages. Winter wheat is mature and harvesting continued between the showers; yields are reported in the 70 bu/ac range with some symptoms of fusarium head blight noted.
Canola is pod filling. Soybeans range from R3 to R5. Sunflowers are in R5 growth stages with corn in the silking/blister stage of development.

 

There are increased reports of soybean aphids with populations building but still below economic threshold levels. There are increasing reports of phytophthora wilt in soybeans. Damage from sclerotinia is noted in canola fields that were not sprayed with fungicide.

 

Pastures are rated at 90% good and 10% fair condition as timely rains are allowing for regrowth. Currently, hay supplies are rated at 20% surplus and 80% adequate. Hay quality is rated as good. Availability of livestock water is adequate.

 

Interlake Region

Heavy rain and hail were experienced last week in the Interlake Region. Precipitation amounts varied from 10 mm to just under 100 mm of rain in the Woodlands area. Temperatures stayed seasonal with temperatures ranging from 22 to 25oC daytime, and 11 to 16oC night time. There were reports of hail on Friday afternoon in the Warren area. The impact from excess moisture throughout the Interlake Region is starting to show as crops mature.

 

Harvest is very close to being in full swing in areas of the South Interlake. Producers are busy with preharvest applications and swathing spring cereals, peas and canola fields. Reports of winter wheat proteins ranging from 10.5 to 11.0% with yields of 65 to 75 bu/ac. Peas are being harvested with reports of 55 to 65 bu/ac yields in the South Interlake. Soybeans continue to fill pods and flower, sunflowers continue to flower, corn staging is at the VT to early R1.

 

Forage grass seed harvest will start this week as field and crop conditions allow. In most annual crops to date, insect pressure is low or not meeting the economic thresholds to spray. However, spraying in alfalfa seed fields is occurring as lygus bugs populations are meeting the economic thresholds.

 

Haying operations progressed quite well this past week due to less shower activity. Less hay bales are being wrapped for silage and more hay is being baled dry. Producers are cutting annual crops for greenfeed. Pastures are still holding up fairly well due to the past four weeks of shower activities. Foxtail barley and some other unpalatable species are becoming more noticeable in pastures due to selective grazing. Availability of water for livestock consumption remains adequate.

 

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Crop conditions holding their ground


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 10, 2015

Today's new imagery reveals that things have hle dtheir ground - with more blue areas (good) and the brown being pushed out (well, at least for SK and MB).  To see how much things have changed, see http://www.flaman.com/blog.php?id=225&title=Crop conditions improving a lot

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Crop conditions continue improving


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 06, 2015

Things continue to improve!  More dark blue (higher than normal vegetation), and the brown (much lower than normal) has almost been entirely squeezed out of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

 

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Saskatchewan crop report - moisture much improved


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 06, 2015

The Saskatchewan crop report from today reveals that . . . (note the weekly rainfall map at bottom, followed by an old then current crop mositure conditions - things are much improved!)

Harvest has begun in some parts of the province, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report.  Less than one per cent of the provincial crop has been combined, while one per cent is ready to straight-cut.

Twenty-three per cent of fall rye, 10 per cent of winter wheat, five per cent of field peas and two per cent of lentils are now in the bin.  Two per cent of canola is now swathed. 
The province received a lot of rain last week, which has lodged many crops and flooded some fields and yards.

Topsoil moisture conditions have improved in many areas, thanks to rainfall that ranged from small amounts to well over six inches.  Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as four per cent surplus, 69 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and three per cent very short.

Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as two per cent surplus, 58 per cent adequate, 33 per cent short and seven per cent very short.

Livestock producers now have 80 per cent of the hay crop baled or put into silage, while an additional 12 per cent is cut and will soon be ready for baling.  Hay quality is rated as three per cent excellent, 53 per cent good, 36 per cent fair and eight per cent poor.

Pasture conditions are rated as one per cent excellent, 32 per cent good, 38 per cent fair, 23 per cent poor and six per cent very poor.

Some crops were damaged this week by strong winds, heavy rain, insects such as aphids and lack of moisture.

 

 

 

 

Full report at https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2015/august/06/crop-report

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Manitoba crop report - harvest starting, low fusarium


Written By: Eric Anderson, Aug 04, 2015
Crop Report: Issue 14, August 4, 2015

Weekly Provincial Summary

  • Winter wheat and fall rye harvest is underway in Manitoba. Preliminary reports indicate winter wheat yields range from 60 to 85 bu/acre, with low levels of fusarium damaged kernels in harvested samples.
  • There are also a few fields of spring wheat, barley and field peas harvested last week.
  • Swathing or preharvest applications in the earliest-seeded spring cereal fields has started.
  • The majority of spring seeded crops are either grain-filling or podding, with some of the later seeded crops finishing up flowering.

Full report at http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/crop-report-archive/2015-08-04-crop-report.html

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Alberta crop report - yield estimates starting to develop


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 31, 2015

Alberta Crop Conditions as of July 28, 2015


The continuation of moderate temperatures combined with wide spread shower activity throughout the province have placed crops are under less stress and crop condition ratings have stabilized at 30% rated good or excellent (See Table #1). The precipitation received this week has provided modest improvements to soil moisture ratings. Surface moisture ratings increased 2 points to 32% rated good or excellent and sub soil ratings improved 4 percentage points to 29% rated good or excellent. Most crops have completed their reproductive stage with only a small amount of late seeded crop remaining. Precipitation from this point onward will have minimal effect on yield potential but would continue to be very beneficial in kernel filling and seed test weight which would affect grade and ultimately price to the producer.


The first yield estimates of the season (See Table #2) have been published. These estimates are provided based upon extremely limited information at this time and will be updated bi-weekly. Current provincial estimates are approximately 25 – 30% below the average of the past 5 years though it should be noted that 2 of those years (2013 & 2014) produced the highest average yields ever reported for the province.
Hay and pastures continue to green up with the moisture and growth has restarted. First cut dryland haying is 90% complete with poor yields and so-so quality as only 65% of the crop is rated as good or excellent. 2nd cut irrigated haying is 20% completed with average yields and very good quality. Hay/pasture ratings have improved slightly this week to 44% poor (-4), 38% fair (no change), 18% good (+4), 1% excellent (no change).

 

Full report at http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$Department/deptdocs.nsf/all/sdd15453

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SK Crop report - moisture better crops improved


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 30, 2015

The Government of Saskatchewan is reporting that . . . .

Released on July 30, 2015

Haying continues to advance in the province as livestock producers now have 67 per cent of the hay crop baled or put into silage. An additional 14 per cent is cut and ready for baling, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report. Hay quality is currently rated as two per cent excellent, 46 per cent good, 44 per cent fair and eight per cent poor. 

The Ministry of Agriculture has a Forage, Feed and Custom Service listing for producers to advertise and source feed products. It is available at www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/FeedForageListing

Topsoil moisture conditions have greatly improved in much of the province, thanks to heavy rains early in the week. Rainfall ranged from small amounts to well over four inches in some areas. Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as seven per cent surplus, 62 per cent adequate, 25 per cent short and six per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 50 per cent adequate, 36 per cent short and 10 per cent very short.

Crops are ripening quickly, and the majority remains in poor-to-good condition. Harvest is just beginning in some parts of the province, with pulses being desiccated and some winter cereal and pulse crops being combined. Wind, hail, localized flooding and lack of rain have caused some crop damage this week.

Moisture map

Full report at https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2015/july/30/crop-report-for-the-period-july-21-to-27-2015

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Rain helps a lot of the prairies get back to normal


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 29, 2015

The past few days' rain accumulation was several inches across a lot of the prairies.  The map below reveals the past 7-days' accumulation.

This rain moved a lot of regions back to normal accumulation levels for the year.  The first image below is where we are at today, the 2nd was where we were at on July 1st (when compared to normal).

 

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Moldy Wheat Means Lowest Quality Winter Crop in USA in 17 Years


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 29, 2015

Bloomberg is reporting that . . .

The quality of some of the first wheat harvested by U.S. farmers in 2015 is the worst in at least 17 years, according to one measure, following heavy rainfall across parts of the Midwest.

A report on Friday by U.S. Wheat Associates, a trade group, tracked the so-called falling number, a gauge of sprout damage in crops. The data was the worst since 1998, backing up comments from grain handlers about the condition of the soft-red winter wheat crop, which accounts for about a fifth of total domestic wheat output.

“It was the worst crop we’ve ever had because of the rain,” said Kim Holsapple, grain manager for Total Grain Marketing in Effingham, Illinois, which operates about 30 elevators in the state. “The wheat we’re getting in now is just nothing but feed quality.”

 

Farmers will produce 393 million bushels of the soft-red winter variety this year, down 14 percent from 2014, according to government forecasts. While the most recent government estimate is for total U.S. wheat production to reach a three-year high, the state of the winter crop shows how quickly the outlook for crops can worsen because of adverse weather.

Full story at http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-07-27/moldy-wheat-means-lowest-quality-winter-crop-in-17-years

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Crop conditions improving even more


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 27, 2015

The July 26 crop condition assessment imagery reveals that the recent rains have helped a lot of areas' crops.  The July 26 image portrays less brown with more yellow and blue regions, than say the July 5 image (both provided below).  This means that in comparison to previous years, more areas are starting to look similar and some even better than normal.

 

 

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Manitoba crop report - most crops are good


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 27, 2015

Today's Manitoba crop report is . . . .

  • Generally, the condition of most crop types is rated as good in Manitoba.  The continuing hot and humid weather conditions are advancing crops quickly.
  • Harvest of winter wheat and fall rye is expected to start this week. To date, low disease pressure is noted in the winter cereal crops.
  • Thunderstorms of varying severity resulted in excess moisture, hail activity and lodging of crops across some areas of Manitoba.

Precipitation to date looks good too:

 

Full report at http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/crop-report-archive/2015-07-27-crop-report.html

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Europe's harvest begins - looks OK


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 24, 2015

Reuters is reporting that . . . .

The harvest is moving northwards in both France and the second biggest producer Germany, but has yet to start in Britain where rain has been too late to arrive to help the crop much. Storms have slowed the Polish harvest.

 

French trade and analyst's soft wheat crop forecasts are now around 37.5-38.5 million tonnes against 37.5 million in 2014, above estimates of around 36.5-37 million tonnes during a heatwave and dryness in mid-July.

Protein levels were reported to be good in southwest France, but disappointing in a belt crossing France between the Atlantic port of La Pallice to the German border. Other quality criteria such as Hagberg falling numbers and humidity were reported to be good nationwide.

Agritel forecast Germany's crop at 24.9 million tonnes, down 10 percent on 2014.

 

In Britain prolonged dry weather could crimp yields.

Full story at http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/07/24/europe-wheat-harvest-idUSL5N10428T20150724

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Alberta crop report - surface moisture up 10%


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 24, 2015

The Government of Alberta is reporting that

Over the past week most of the province received upwards of 20 mm of rain, which helped dry areas and somewhat alleviated moisture stress on cereals and oilseeds crops. Localized areas around Calgary, Red Deer, Rocky Mountain House, Valleyview/High Prairie and Smoky Lake received over 50 mm of precipitation. Scattered hail storms were reported in a few areas with some crop damage. Areas missed by the recent rains included northern and western parts of the Peace Region and the south east area of the South Region, where both locations received less than 10 mm of rain.

Due to the recent rainfall, surface soil moisture ratings across the province improved by 10 per cent this week to 30 per cent good to excellent. However, soil moisture conditions remain extremely low through many areas, especially north of Edmonton and through much of northern and eastern Peace Region. Sub-surface soil moisture conditions are on par with last week, rated as 28 per cent poor, 47 per cent fair, 23 per cent good and two per cent excellent (see Table 1). Significant rain would still be welcome to help crops fill as well as improve hay and pasture conditions, especially in the areas with low soil moisture reserves.

Provincially, crop growing conditions did not changed significantly from last week and are rated as 27 per cent poor, 43 per cent fair, 29 per cent good and one per cent excellent. Spring wheat is rated as 26 per cent poor, 41 per cent fair, 32 per cent good and one per cent excellent, and canola is at 33 per cent poor, 42 per cent fair, 24 per cent good and one per cent excellent (see Table 2). Some producers are cutting crops for greenfeed in anticipation of low winter feed supplies.

Tame hay and pasture continue to show the full effects of the dry spring and summer conditions, although the recent rain helped turn pasture green in some regions. Provincially, hay and pasture conditions are reported as 48 per cent poor, 38 per cent fair and 14 per cent good. Grasshoppers remain an issue in many areas across the province, with the most damage being reported in the Peace Region.

Full report at http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$Department/deptdocs.nsf/all/sdd15443

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Sakatchewan crops 63 to 68 % at normal development


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 23, 2015

According to today's Saskatchewan Crop Report . . . .

Sixty-six per cent of fall cereals, 68 per cent of spring cereals, 64 per cent of oilseeds and 63 per cent of pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Crops are ripening quickly, although the majority remain in poor-to-good condition. Lack of moisture and insects such as grasshoppers and aphids have caused the most crop damage this week.

Hay quality is currently rated as two per cent excellent, 52 per cent good, 38 per cent fair and eight per cent poor. Hay yields on dry land are well below the five year average (2010-2014). Average hay yields on dry land are estimated to be 0.8 ton per acre for alfalfa, 0.9 ton per acre for alfalfa/brome hay, 0.7 ton per acre for both other tame hay and wild hay, and 1.3 tons per acre for greenfeed. On irrigated land, average hay yields are estimated to be 2.2 tons per acre for alfalfa and alfalfa/brome hay, 2.5 tons per acre for other tame hay, 1.9 tons per acre for wild hay, and 3.1 tons per acre for greenfeed.

The full report is at https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2015/july/23/crop-report-for-the-period-july-14-to-20-2015

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Saskatchewan crop moisture much improved


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 23, 2015

Today's Saskatchewan crop report contains (as usual) a crop moisture map.  When we compare today's map to one from jsut three weeks ago, the changes are a welcome site.  There are far less dry and more 'normal' regions.

The full report is at https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2015/july/23/crop-report-for-the-period-july-14-to-20-2015

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CWB tour reports durum doing better in South East Alberta


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 22, 2015

Durum, the wheat used to make pasta, has fared better against dry conditions than other major crops in a pocket of southeastern Alberta, crop tour scouts noted on Wednesday.

Durum is typically planted in drier soils than spring wheat, but fields still looked surprisingly decent, given some of the driest conditions in decades on the Prairies.

Yields looked to fall slightly below average in the area, said Justin Daniels, director of commodity risk management at CWB Market Research Services.

“We haven’t seen a disaster yet in durum,” he said in drizzly conditions.

The tour organized by CWB Market Research is travelling through Thursday on three routes across the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Durum stood tall and carried large heads of kernels in most fields.

Quality of durum in Canada — the biggest exporter – may be more important than the crop’s size, given lower grades last year, said Courtney Boryski, a trader at U.S. commodity company Gavilon.

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CWB tour reports crops varied in Saskatchewan


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 22, 2015

The effect of this years dry weather is becoming increasingly apparent as the CWB crop tour moves into Saskatchewan.
Lack of moisture is visible in southwestern Manitoba and southeastern Saskatchewan, the CWB tour found.

However, dryness hasn’t been all bad in some areas — participants from the 2014 crop tour recall a field last year that was drowned out and covered in cattails. This year the same field near Hartney, Man. still had signs of moisture damage, but canola crops had improved significantly.

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Manitoba crop report July 20 - looks good


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 20, 2015

Manitoba is reporting that . . .

Another week of generally good growing conditions continues to advance crops across Manitoba. Localized thunderstorms did result in significant precipitation amounts in some areas of the province, while other areas would still benefit from additional moisture.

Disease pressure and insect activity continues to be monitored as the growing season progresses.

Precipitation accumulation is good.

Full story at http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/crop-report-archive/2015-07-20-crop-report.html

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Crop conditions improving


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 20, 2015

Less brown (bad) now and more green (good) than before.

 

Charts from http://www26.statcan.ca/ccap-peec/start-debut-eng.jsp

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Canola replating may hinder winter wheat seeding


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 20, 2015

CNS is reporting that . . .

With canola as the preferred stubble choice into which to seed winter wheat in Western Canada, it’s possible farmers will run into problems seeding this fall due to vast canola reseeding in early June.

“The crop insurance said there was over a million acres reseeded (in Manitoba), and when you reseed, unless you were very early when you started, that’s going to put the crop back,” said Jake Davidson, executive director of Winter Cereals Canada.

“If the canola is not off in time, it’s going to get in our way a bit as far as the seeding of the winter wheat goes.”

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