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Saskatchewan Harvest 2017: A 48-year career farmer talks draught, agriculture technology, and facing the inevitable tough times


Written By: Amy Rederburg, Nov 09, 2017
Harvest 2017 was a tough year for many Saskatchewan farmers.
 
Doug Jones of Whitby Farms was one of Saskatchewan's first to wrap up harvest 2017. He says it's thanks to a prototype loaner combine -- one of two sent for field testing in Western Canada -- on top of the two he runs every other year. And a family team that works together year round.
 
The Flaman Agriculture team caught up with Doug while he had a few fleeting moments of free time on his hands. We talked about what effect this years' terrible drought conditions had on his farm, agriculture technology that matters for harvest 2017, and his advice for young farmers facing a tough climate for growth. All before he left for the field to help one of his neighbours finish their harvest.
 
What does Whitby Farms do?
 
Whitby Farms manages around 11 acres of land and grows a variety of grain, cereal, and bean crops; raises cattle and trains quarter horses; offers grain hauling services; and much more in the country surrounding the Great Sandhills at Lucky Lake, about 150 kilometres south of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
 
The family-owned Whitby Farms stays busy all year round. While Doug’s brother does seeding, his nephew sprays, his son-in-law manages cattle, and his daughter trains quarter horses. They have one hired man who's been with them for 10 years. After a decade of service you could say their hired man has become as close as family. In case you’re wondering, Doug refers to himself as “the gopher” of the operation.
 
We asked, "Who runs the combine at harvest?"
 
Doug jokingly replied, "That's the easiest job in the world! [With the automations these days,] mowing your lawn is way more complicated."
 
He likes that today's combines automatically update as conditions change, so you don't have to manually reset when something goes wrong. He thinks of driving a combine as the perfect job for a multitasker.
 
Harvest 2017 wisdom from a 48-year farming career.
 
Doug's been farming since 1969. And he says, "I never changed my mind once."
 
He recalls taking the leap just before the start of one of the worst periods in farming history, the farm crisis of the 1970s and 1980s, when anyone who started farming "went broke". This was due to a combination of bad economy, dried up foreign markets, and high debt resulting in thousands losing their farms.
 
But Doug was stubborn about his dream to become a farmer and raise cattle. He says it's the only thing he's ever wanted to do.
   
How did drought conditions in Saskatchewan affect Whitby Farms for Harvest 2017?
 
The lack of rain and the heat did a number on his crops, along with many other farmers around the prairies. Doug says his crops are located in the lowest rainfall RM in the province of Saskatchewan. And they didn't get a lot of rain last year, which means soil moisture was low this year. He admits they've had better looking crops in previous years.
 
Their lentils performed the worst and canola would have been a disaster without support from an agrologist.
 
He says, "When I started out farming, [this years' canola harvest] would have been less than 10 bushels in the acre." They got 20 this year, but they're used to an average of 50.
 
Despite a lackluster harvest due to the low moisture and extreme heat drought conditions, Doug remains positive. He thinks the new varieties of canola are "amazing" and credits their performance to scientific advancements in the seed.
 
But there was an upside. Whitby Farms came out with perfect quality lentils and durum over a string of three consecutive years with salvage value. Doug improved the crops’ success by implementing an irrigation system that uses water from nearby Lake Diefenbaker and a preventative spraying process.
 
He’s not the only one that’s happy with his yield given the dry conditions. CBC News reported that other Saskatchewan farmers were surprised at the quality of Harvest 2017.
 
The drought conditions affected the Whitby Farms livestock, too. Doug and his son-in-law had to dig one of the farm's springs out twice to get the water moving again. Their quick thinking likely saved the cattle and horses from heat stroke, unlike another unfortunate case that killed 200 cattle.
 
How do you stick with it during tough times like Saskatchewan Harvest 2017?
 
Doug declares, "Young farmers aren't used to the tough years!"
 
Since the farm crisis, Doug has noticed that the cycle has a way of repeating itself. He cautions many farmers face a similar fate without proper planning. 
 
"Work as hard as you can! It's going to stay dry. You'll hardly see a field that hasn't been affected by drought."
 
He adds, "[We farmers] are at the whim of markets and weather. [Have a plan in place] if your wage is cut in half."
 
Doug reminds young farmers to hope for the best and prepare for the worst, so you'll always stay ahead. The young farmers who have a lot of faith and prepare for hard times in advance can give themselves stability in tough years.
 
Doug’s final words of wisdom for Saskatchewan Harvest 2017:


"If you focus on it and stick with it through tough times, you'll make it out alright. You have to bear down. Take risks and buy some land."
 
Doug Jones is a long-time customer of Flaman Agriculture in Saskatchewan, most recently purchasing a set of new grain bins and monitoring and a longer auger to reach taller grain bins.
 
Like learning about hard-working people, community roots, and new ag solutions? Subscribe to the Flaman Agriculture blog HERE. You’ll be the first to hear about the latest insights from the team!
 
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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with Saskatchewan Harvest 2017 grain bins wheatheart auger grain monitoring | More articles by Amy Rederburg

Fusarium Field Day


Written By: April, Flaman MarketingJul 21, 2017
We’re going on a Field Trip! On Tuesday, July 25th 2017, we’re off to Melfort Research Farms, located 1.6 miles south of Melfort, Sk on Hwy 6. They are putting on a morning event all about Fusarium Head Blight. With two industry experts to walk you through all the activities and information, the day is scheduled to start at 9AM and topics include:
  • Fusarium Head Blight Biology
  • Effects of FHB on Cereal Crops
  • Optimal Application Technology
  • How to Improve Grade Out of the Field
PLUS! Bring your Grain Samples and have it cleaned and tested! If you have a sample of grain (minimum two, 5 Gallon pails) bring it and have it tested for vomi-levels before, cleaned, and tested after so you can see in live action how you are able to Improve the Grade of your grain this harvest. Machines will be on site complete with staff to operate them and explain how it works.

Everyone is welcome and it’s completely FREE! Pre-registration is requested to ensure enough chairs and space is made available. Just click here to send in your name, email, and how many people are attending (don’t forget to count yourself).
In addition to Tuesday’s Fusarium day, Melfort Research Farms is hosting a second Field day the following day, Wednesday July 26th 2017. You can use the same registration link to sign up for Tuesday, Wednesday, or both days.

See you there!
 
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Posted in Technology | Tagged with fusarium head blight melfort research farms FDK information vomi-toxin vomi level testing grain cleaning fusarium | More articles by April

Demand Grows for Vomitoxin Cleaning Services - excerpt


Written By: MIchelle Corry, Flaman MarketingApr 11, 2017
Below is an excerpt from "Demand Grows for Vomitoxin Cleaning Services" by Brian Cross of the Western Producer. For the full article visit the Western Producer Online

With fusarium graminearum and its toxic vomitoxin sidekick deoxynivalenol (DON) stealing potentially hundreds of millions of dollars a year from Canadian farm revenues, the thought of paying toll processors to clean up commercial grain deliveries is gaining momentum.

Mitch Flaman, operations manager with Flaman Grain Cleaning and Handling, said a lot of growers mistakenly assume that a sample with little or no FDK should easily meet industry standards or contract specs for vomitoxin. However, removing FDK does not guarantee that vomitoxin levels are also being lowered. Flaman said it’s critically important to know what you have in your bin and what you’re trying to remove from a sample.

“Early in the season, a lot of guys were getting away with selling their grain based on visual parameters only,” said Flaman, who sells a variety of grain cleaners, including colour sorters, gravity tables and highly specialized machines that sort grain using near infrared transmittance.“ In other words, if you could clean up your grain visually, there were some elevators that were buying based on visual grades only,” he said. “But what we started to find out later was that some stuff that looked very good visually still had very high levels of vomitoxin. So toward the end of the year, it seemed like almost every elevator started to price grain based on vomitoxin.”

The task of buying and selling grain can become a bit murky when FDK and vomitoxin are involved. In part, that’s because FDK is recognized in Canada as a visual grading determinant, while vomitoxin is not. However, vomitoxin is often mentioned in delivery contracts as a quality or contract spec, meaning high levels can significantly affect the value of grain being sold, regardless of how good the delivery looks. In some cases, farmers who cleaned up their samples to remove FDK were surprised to learn that they were facing substantial price discounts because vomitoxin levels were still above spec, Flaman said. “Understanding the difference between visual FDK and internal kernel toxicity (DON) has kept the industry busy with this year’s epidemic.”

“In the last few weeks, I’ve had more interest, more inquiries from people that are interested in (cleaning grain), than I could possibly handle in an entire year,” said Jason Basset, a grain farmer from Bruno, Sask., who also runs a grain cleaning company called Peterson Grain Processing. Basset is currently waiting to take delivery of a BoMill TriQ, a Swedish built grain cleaner that uses near infrared transmittance to remove vomitoxin. Unlike colour sorters that use near infrared reflectance to assess the external surface of a seed, the TriQ uses light to penetrate the seed coat. This allows the machine to assess a seed’s internal chemical composition. The TriQ has the ability to analyze each seed individually and sort seeds based on vomitoxin levels. Basset plans to use his machine to remove vomitoxin from malting barley. Vomitoxin specs for malting barley are typically.5 to one p.p.m. In one barley sample that Basset had analyzed, the TriQ removed 18 percent of the most heavily infected kernels and reduced total vomitoxin levels from two p.p.m. or higher to .5 p.p.m. or lower. In that scenario, a 10,000 bushel bin of barley that would otherwise be rejected by maltsters and sold as feed could potentially be cleaned and sold as 8,200 bu. of malt.

For the full article visit the Western Producer Online

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with grain cleaning Bomill Vomitoxin Fusarium | More articles by MIchelle Corry

Kenaston, Sk Has New Grain Cleaning Technology


Written By: April Basset, Marketing CoordinatorFeb 03, 2017
Spectrum Grain Solutions, located in Bashaw, Alberta, has purchased a BoMill TriQ grain sorter that has been installed in Kenaston, Sk. The Swedish-made BoMill TriQ has the capabilities to sort grain based on the interior make-up of each kernel, rather than the exterior appearance. It uses NIT (Near Infrared Transmission) technology to analyze each kernel and thus can sort grain based on fusarium, protein, vitreousness, seed quality and falling number at a speed of 25,000 kernels per second.
For a full article click here.
 
Learn more about the new technology in BoMill products on our Flaman Grain Cleaning website.
 
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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with BoMill Grain Sorting Grain Cleaning New technology Flaman Grain Cleaning | More articles by April Basset

Monitoring stored grain is an important task


Written By: Cory Jacob, regional crop specialistDec 20, 2016


Monitoring and appropriate management of stored grain (especially tough and damp grain) is essential to ensuring that grain will not spoil and will remain in good shape during storage.
Grain needs to be monitored while in storage, as no monitoring can lead to drastic losses, especially when a good portion of grain was harvested as damp and tough.
Grain moisture content and temperature are two important factors that affect grain storage.
Dry grain can spoil if the seed temperature is too high and grain initially within safe moisture and temperature levels can still spoil due to hot spots forming and moisture migration within the grain bin.
Grain acts like an insulator and can hold temperatures for a fair amount of time if left undisturbed. Actually, it is not uncommon for larger bins to have grain temperatures in the centre that have not changed much since harvest, though it is close to freezing outside the bin.
Moisture migration occurs when warm and or moist grain in the bin is at a warmer temperature than the temperature outside the bin, as a result cold air moves down the interior of the bin to the bottom of the grain mass and is drawn to the centre of the bin by an upward flow of warmer air.
As the cold air is drawn up the grain, it warms and flows to the surface of the grain. The warm air is cooled as it reaches the surface, condenses, and the cycle repeats. The condensation that occurs at the top of the grain creates a high moisture zone that is prone to spoilage and mold growth. Some fungal species can grow at relatively low seed moisture contents, and their growth results in the production of moisture, which allows other more harmful fungal species to develop.
Grain spoilage is relatively undetectable in early stages. Cooling the grain to under minus eight degrees Celsius will deactivate mold growth. For insects, temperatures below 18 degrees Celsius limit their movement and reproduction.
In the fall or winter, moving the grain during cold weather can help to decrease the temperature in the bin, eliminating hot spots and can kill grain storage insects depending how much the grain temperature is lowered and for how long.
A variety of methods exist to monitor stored grain; a monitor that continually records the temperature of the stored grain is the best indicator of how long the grain will store for. If a rapid temperature increase occurs, immediate action needs to be taken.
Management practices include cooling grain to within five degrees Celsius of the outside air temperature as soon as possible as this will equalize the temperature within the bin. Using aeration or moving grain will help to accomplish this.
As the outside temperature cools, you may wish to cool the grain until it is close to or below freezing for winter storage. Monitor multiple times a week for changes in grain temperature. Pay close attention to grain in large bins and grain bags, especially where grain is tough and damp. –
 
See more at: http://www.weyburnthisweek.com/news/monitoring-stored-grain-is-an-important-task-1.3523115

© Copyright Weyburn This Week 2016



Author Cory Jacob holds MSc. and BSc. in agronomy from the University of Saskatchewan. He has held various agronomy-related summer jobs in private industry, and also has experience as a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Saskatchewan. Cory works closely with producers and industry to help alleviate current and future issues in crop production. Cory grew up on a grain farm in southeast Saskatchewan in the Mutrie district.


See Grain Bins & Storage Solutions

See Grain Monitoring Systems


See how Grain Monitoring works! --> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6VDIdEcUeI

 
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Posted in Ag news | Tagged with grain monitoring agriculture moisture temperature cables | More articles by Cory Jacob

Tillage Equipment recruited to deal with moisture issues


Written By: Lee Hart, Field EditorOct 21, 2016

Tillage recruited to deal with moisture issues

Necessity is the mother of invention, but weather appears to be the mother of necessity, these days. That seems to fit as producers talk about the need for tillage in this October Farmer Panel.

Largely in response to high residue levels, he says in some areas they are using a tandem disc and in others a vertical tillage tool.

“Tillage seems to be what a lot are looking at these days,” says Boles. “There is a bit of a craze going on to use some tillage. It’s all related to moisture in this area too. It was dry for many of the past 15 years, but since about 2010 we have had wetter seasons.” That contributed to excess moisture for seeding and harvest and big crops with plenty of residue.

Article By Lee Hart | GrainNews | October 18th 2016

SEE FULL ARTICLE






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Posted in Ag news | Tagged with Tillage Prairie Oct 2016 Breaking Discs Farming Grain News Flaman | More articles by Lee Hart

Prepare for that great crop - storage and cleaning


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jun 28, 2016
With everybody forecasting a great crop, are you prepared to harvest it? 

Are the combine(s) fast enough? Are there enough trucks ready to move the grain to a bin or bagging area?  Maybe the ground is wet, so is a grain cart ready to move the grain off the field towards a truck, bin, or bagging area?  Is the bagger ready with enough bags? Are the transfers, augers or conveyors able to quickly unload the grain and move it, which allows for the combine to keep moving without having to wait for unloading?

And once it's off, if you didn’t catch the fusarium with spraying, well it’s not too late.  You can use (1) a gravity table to separate the lighter infected kernels – the current best option for farmers, (2) a colour sorter/separator to pull then visually infected kernels – maybe not as good as a gravity table, or (3) a BoMill which is best used by end-users such as food processing facilities.”

Flaman Grain Cleaning and handling has all you need to get the crop into the bank.



 
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Posted in Crop reports | Tagged with crop report auger conveyor grain handling | More articles by Eric Anderson

CN CP must repay grain revenues - millions


Written By: Eric Anderson, Dec 30, 2015
  • 30 Dec 2015
  • The Canadian Press

CN, CP must repay grain revenues

Railways have 30 days to cough up penalties for exceeding entitlements

The Canadian Transportation Agency says the country’s two main railways have exceeded their Western grain revenue entitlements for the 2014- 2015 crop year and must repay those sums along with penalties.

According to the transportation agency, Canadian National Railway’s grain revenue of $ 745,068,906 was $ 6,866,595 above its entitlement, while Canadian Pacific Railway received $ 2,137,168 above its revenue entitlement of $ 724,045,774.

The agency says CN and CP have 30 days to repay the amounts by which they exceeded their entitlements, in addition to a five per cent penalty of $ 343,330 for CN and $ 106,858 for CP.

Regulations stipulate that such payments must be made to the Western Grains Research Foundation, a farmer financed and directed organization set up to fund research to benefit Prairie farmers.

Officials with the railways were not immediately available for comment.

In the 2014- 2015 crop year, 41,306,191 tonnes of Western grain were shipped — 7.4 per cent more than in the previous crop year.
The Canada Transportation Act requires the agency to determine each railway company’s annual maximum revenue entitlement and whether such entitlement has been exceeded.

The maximum revenue entitlement is a form of economic regulation that enables CN and CP to set their own rates for services, provided the total amount of revenue collected from their shipments of Western grain remains below the ceiling set by the agency.
Entitlements are calculated using a formula containing numerous elements under the act.
 
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Posted in Ag news | Tagged with rail grain | More articles by Eric Anderson

Group looking to buy Port of Churchill Rail Line


Written By: Eric Anderson, Dec 21, 2015
19 Dec 2015
Leader-Post
The Canadian Press
 
First Nations group looking to buy rail line
 
 
 
A troubled rail line and port in northern Manitoba may be sold to a group of First Nations communities in the area.
 
Denver-based OmniTrax says it has accepted a letter of intent from the group over the sale of the Port of Churchill and the Hudson Bay rail line.
 
The company says there’s a 45day period of due diligence before a sale can be completed, and the federal and provincial governments will be asked to support the group buying the assets. OmniTrax took over the rail line and port in 1997.
 
Churchill is Canada’s only deepwater northern port and relies heavily on grain shipments from western farmers.
 
Those grain shipments were less than half the normal 500,000 tonnes this year, which prompted OmniTrax to look for a new owner.
 
Earlier this month, the Manitoba government said it was looking for federal help to ensure the continued operation of the northern line. Manitoba Transportation Minister Steve Ashton met with federal counterpart Marc Garneau in Ottawa.
The line is the only land link to Churchill and three other communities from the south.
 
Omnitrax Canada president Merv Tweed indicated that service could be discontinued if no new buyer were found. He also suggested governments could have the railway operate as a utility, presumably with regulation of rates and some form of subsidy in poor years.
 
Ashton suggested the long-term survival of the port and railway could depend on expanding port storage facilities to handle potash and other goods.
 
The northern rail line, which crosses hundreds of kilometres of bog and permafrost, has been plagued by derailments that have intermittently forced the suspension of both freight and passenger services.
 
OmniTrax had thought of shipping crude oil along the railway, but backed off the plan last year.
 
The proposal was opposed by First Nations groups, environmentalists and the government of Manitoba.
 
 
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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with grain transportation rail | More articles by Eric Anderson

Wheat and durum exports high, canola down


Written By: Eric Anderson, Nov 17, 2015
Today's data from Statistics Canada reveals that September 2015; wheat exports were down slightly from 2014, but up over every other previous year; durum exports were the best ever; and canola was down from historical levels.


The long term yearly trends revealed that wheat and durum continued a staircase style climb while canola plunged.
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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with grain exports Canada | More articles by Eric Anderson

Used-grain bag rollers make clean-up easy and qualifies for rebate


Written By: Eric Anderson, Nov 05, 2015
Used-grain bag rollers make clean-up easy and qualifies for rebate
 
The Arc Alloy Pro Grain Bag Roller Model 1510 from Flaman, allows you to quickly roll-up your used gran bags – it sort of turns the stretched out empty bag into a round bail.  A bumper pull or skid mount options can be added to the base model.
 

See it in action at:  https://youtu.be/4Q6rzkWe2bI
See it at http://www.flamanagriculture.com/pro-grain-bag-roller-p470
And, it qualifies for a 50% rebate* with a Saskatchewan Environmental farm Plan
For details on project eligibility and to download a rebate application, contact the Saskatchewan Financial Programs Branch at 1.877.874 or visit www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/Plastic-Grain-Bag-Roller-BMP
*50 per cent of eligible costs to a maximum of $5,000; all work must occur before January 31, 2018
 
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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with grain bag roller recycle efp | More articles by Eric Anderson

Grain deliveries hit record high in September


Written By: Eric Anderson, Oct 23, 2015
CNS Canada — September was a very busy month for grain handlers in Western Canada, as farmer deliveries into the commercial pipeline hit their highest levels ever.
Producers made deliveries of 5.879 million tonnes of the major grains and oilseeds during the month, topping the previous monthly record of 5.819 million tonnes set two years earlier in September 2013, according to Statistics Canada data that goes back to 2001. The major grains and oilseeds included in the total are wheat, durum, oats, barley, rye, flaxseed and canola.
Canola deliveries hit a monthly record of their own, at 2.384 million tonnes. That compares with the previous record, of 1.956 million that was also hit in September 2013, according to the StatsCan data.
Canada grew a record 18.5 million-tonne canola crop in 2013, which accounted for the heavy deliveries at the time. However, official production numbers in 2015 are considerably more modest, with StatsCan currently forecasting the 2015 canola crop at 14.3 million tonnes.
Wheat was also moving out of producers’ hands at a very brisk pace in September, with the monthly deliveries of 2.846 million tonnes the third highest on record. The large wheat deliveries also came despite the fact that Canada’s 2015 wheat crop, at 26.1 million tonnes, was well off the previous record of 37.5 million tonnes set in 2013.
Farmers delivered 570,210 tonnes of durum, 311,416 tonnes of oats and 278,140 tonnes of barley during the month. None of those were a record in their own right, but deliveries were still well above the averages.
 
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Posted in Crop reports | Tagged with grain deliveries | More articles by Eric Anderson

Used Grain Bag Roller - Government Rebate up to $5000


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 30, 2015

The Government of Saskatchewan has published that . . . .

Plastic Grain Bag Roller BMP

Intent of BMP:

Removing grain from grain bags often occurs during the winter months when snow and ice buildup can make it difficult to remove the bag from the field. Having access to a grain bag roller as the grain is extracted makes consolidation and recycling of the plastic easier and more convenient. The plastic also remains cleaner if immediately rolled which is preferred by the recycling industry. Recycling is an environmentally preferred alternative to burning, burying or taking bags to landfill sites. 

This BMP will assist producers with the purchase of a grain bag roller. The intent of the BMP is to better manage, store and recycle grain bags thereby reducing the environmental risks associated with improper disposal.

Funding Level:

50 per cent of eligible costs to a maximum of $5,000.

Application Type:

Rebate

Technical Resource:

For more information on this BMP, please contact Financial Programs Branch at 1-877-874-53651-877-874-5365

For information about grain bag recycling programs please contact SimplyAg Solutions Inc. at 1-866-298-71-866-298-7222

Eligibility:

Project Costs:

Eligible Costs:

  • Plastic grain bag stand-alone roller unit.
  • Incorporated roller unit in a grain extractor if it produces a roll acceptable to recycle.
  • Hydraulic components to connect to the tractor hydraulic system if not part of the roller system.

Ineligible Costs:

  • Costs for projects started prior to April 1, 2015. 
  • A trailer to haul the stand-alone roller unit.
  • Equipment for loading or hauling used plastic.
  • Labour including applicant, employee or custom.
  • In-kind labour costs to assemble equipment.
  • Power units not built into the roller unit.
  • Transportation of the roller unit from the dealership to the farm.
  • Used or leased items or equipment. To be eligible, new items or equipment must be purchased from a grain bag dealer or manufacturer.
 

 

Article from http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/Plastic-Grain-Bag-Roller-BMP

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with grain bag roller Saskatchewan | More articles by Eric Anderson

29 varieties to be removed CWRS and CPSR classes


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 30, 2015

The list includes formerly popular varieties such as Katepwa, Harvest and Kane

The Canadian Grain Commission has announced that as of August 1, 2017, 29 varieties will no longer be eligible for of Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) and Canada Prairie Spring Red (CPSR) wheat classes.


The list (below) of 25 CWRS and four CPSR varieties includes formerly popular varieties such as Katepwa, Harvest and Kane as well as Neepawa, which was once the check variety for the CWRS class.

 

The full story is here http://www.agcanada.com/daily/29-varieties-to-be-removed-cwrs-and-cpsr-classes

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with wheat canadian grain commission CWRS CPSR | More articles by Eric Anderson

June grain deliveries up, but quarter looks similar


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 23, 2015

Statistics Canada has released the June 2015 grain deliveries data.

Compared to previous Junes, the deliveries were up dramatically for wheat and canola in Saskatchewan, while Alberta and Manitoba were along current trends.

 

Compared to previous 2nd quarter deliveries, deliveries average-out a bit and on Saskatchewan durum wheat saw a dramatic change.

 

And,.if you want to see the historical flow, here it is:

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with wheat durum canola grain deliveries | More articles by Eric Anderson

Grain movement is going well


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 22, 2015

Qurom is reporing that . . . .

Stocks in Store
• Country stocks this week remained at 2.9 MMT utilizing 69% of the system’s working capacity. Space in
elevators is good. Producer deliveries to primary elevators were 0.8 MMT in Week 49.
• Total western port terminal stocks increased to 1.0 MMT this week, utilizing 57% of the working capacity.
 

Railway Car Supply
• Railcar allocation plans were supplied by CN to Week 51 while CP’s allocation has been calculated using
monthly reports to week 17. (see page 3 for details) Shippers report that rail service and order fulfillment
continues to meet demand to Western Ports. Car allocation to Churchill is underway.

Shipments
• Year to date Western Canadian shipments from port terminal elevators at Week 49 are 23% higher than the
same period last year and 29% higher than the 5-year average.

 

Full story at http://www.grainmonitor.ca/Downloads/WeeklyReports/GMPGOCWeek49.pdf

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with quorum grain monitoring program rail elevators grain handling | More articles by Eric Anderson

Grain transportation review recommendations


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 20, 2015

Ag Canada is reporting that . . . .

Winnipeg — Ongoing assessment of the grain transportation system and better protection for small shippers are two of the eight recommendations made by the Crop Logistics Working Group (CLWG). They will now be submitted to the Canada Transportation Act Review for consideration.

Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz was in Winnipeg Monday to announce the findings of the group’s final report, which he said “provides recommendations for improving the crop logistics system, including comprehensive input into the review underway.”

Greater transparency in the rail market was another recommendation made by the working group, which was composed of 18 stakeholder groups representing growers, handlers and millers.

“I think the biggest thing,” said Ritz. “Would be the data that railways aren’t sharing with shippers. They measure on what they supply, when it comes to cars, not what the market is actually asking them to deliver. There is a double standard there — they say their commitment is to supplying the cars they’re going to supply, not what’s actually asked of them.”

Full story at http://www.agcanada.com/daily/transportation-review-recommendations

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with grain transportation rail | More articles by Eric Anderson

Sask. grain handler cancels share buyback in dry spell


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 17, 2015

CNS is reporting that  . . .

An independent grain terminal in parched northwestern Saskatchewan has called off a planned share repurchase, to conserve cash against a possible drop in its grain handle.

North West Terminal, which operates a grain terminal and ethanol plant just east of Unity, about 90 km southwest of North Battleford, said Thursday it won’t go ahead with the share buyback as announced in February.

The buyback plan had called for NWT to repurchase about $800,000 worth of Class A and Class B NWT shares from shareholders, who are mainly local farmers.

Full story at http://www.agcanada.com/daily/sask-grain-handler-cancels-share-buyback-in-dry-spell

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with Saskatchewan grain handlers | More articles by Eric Anderson

BoMill TriQ: A Fusarium Management Solution


Written By: April Basset, Mar 25, 2015

The newest technology being brought to the Canadian agriculture industry has benefits for everyone. BoMill, a Swedish company, offers a management solution to the fusarium problem that’s been a growing concern in Western Canada. The BoMill TriQ is a grain sorter that sorts wheat, durum, and barley by protein, vitreousness, and fusarium. Sheldon Ball, the sorter specialist at Flaman, says, “It’s the only product we’re aware of that sorts individual kernels by fusarium.” BoMill increases the accuracy of other processes by analyzing the chemical make-up of kernels, not just the colour, and it does it by individual kernel, instead of in a batch.

WHY BOTHER?
FUSARIUM
Fusarium is a fungus that produces mycotoxins during the infection process. Mycotoxins are toxic and are not destroyed during processing such as milling, baking, malting, or ethanol production.*  The BoMill TriQ grain quality sorter will sort the yields and improve the quality for a top selling dollar. More importantly, the sorted yield will be a safer product for final consumption.

VITREOUSNESS
The TriQ is also an excellent tool to clean grain for seed. Its patented technology (read about the NIT below) analyzes the ability a kernel has for germination, or its vitreousness. By setting a fraction to sort by vitreousness, you can get a yield that is 100% capable of germination. Talk about bumper crop potential!

HOW IT’S DONE – FEATURES OF THE BOMILL TRIQ
NIT Technology

NIT (Near Infrared Transmission) Technology is a patented sensory system that utilizes infrared light to test the chemical make up of a kernel. This new technology, found only in the BoMill IQ and TriQ products, allows kernels to be sorted according to their germination capabilities (vitreousness), fusarium, and protein content. This technology is capable of yielded a 100% vitreous output, which translates to guaranteed better yield if used for seed. It also means healthier product for consumption by people and animals.

Individual Kernel Analysis
Although other machines exist that focus on individual kernel sorting, such as color sorting, this is the first machine that sorts individual kernels by fusarium. Other methods will take a batch of grain and sort by weight, making heavier and lighter kernels separate to the top and bottom. This is a good method, however the individual kernel analysis yields a higher accuracy.

Wireless Monitoring
The graphical user interface makes it possible to control the sorting using any device with a browser, such as a PC, tablet, or smartphone. Due to its user-friendly design, it makes the training sessions intuitive and time efficient.

WHERE CAN YOU LEARN MORE?
Flaman Grain Cleaning is the licensed dealer in Canada for BoMill’s grain sorters. “With Flaman as our Distributor in Canada we will have a strong partner,” says Karin Wehlin, CEO BoMill AB. “Flaman’s long presence in the grain cleaning market and know-how as well as established service organization is important for our future”. You can contact one of Flaman’s staff members to get more information by email or by calling 1-888-435-2626. You can also visit the product page for the BoMill TriQ and IQ products.

*Website: http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/fusarium-head-blight
 

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Posted in New Products | Tagged with grain cleaning fusarium grain sorting bomill triQ wheat cleaning durum barley optical sorting | More articles by April Basset

Bin Sense: Secure Your Harvest


Written By: Flaman, Marketing and Communications CoordinatorMay 09, 2014
We all know, in order to prevent grain spoilage, you must keep it at the proper temperature and keep the moisture level low. Millions of dollars are lost every year due to grain spoilage. Intra Grain has a solution to this issue and it is called Bin Sense. Bin Sense monitors your grain 24/7 and, every hour, can wirelessly send you an update on the condition of your grain. This takes the guesswork and risk out of grain storage. Bin Sense not only monitors moisture levels but monitors grain levels as well within the bin so that if theft occurs, you will be notified.
 
The whole Bin Sense Monitoring system is easy to install and even easier to operate. It uses a magnetic mount at the top of your bin, which makes set up/removal simple. Each unit has been highly tested and does not require the use of a power source because it is entirely solar powered with a backup battery. No struggling with extension cords or generators.
 

On Intra Grain’s website, you are able to request a quote and read more about the products and technology. Check it out http://intragrain.com

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Harvest Report: Crop progress and removing dockage


Written By: Mitch Flaman, Sales and MarketingSep 06, 2013

A few weeks ago when I started this blog entry, I was excited to report that agriculture equipment dealerships were approaching sold-out inventory levels and already delivering machinery to numerous producers province-wide. It was actually a bittersweet situation getting stuck on a secondary highway behind a semi hauling a combine for 16 miles with no option to pass. But, on the other hand, it was exciting to know that harvest was just around the corner. Needless to say, a few weeks later harvest is now in full swing and farmers are going hard.

To date, 14% of Saskchewan crops are combined and are experiencing above average yields (Sask Agriculture). “We haven’t seen crops like this in years,” one producer told me as he was gearing up to go swathing. “Let’s just hope the weather permits.” The 2013 crop season is looking to record bumper crops in many areas. One major worry for many producers is the fear of the dirty “F” word – frost. A late spring has consequently resulted in many crops province-wide maturing over a week late due to limiting seeding situations. This creates a vulnerable situation as the growing season is also extended by a week or more. On the plus side, we have been experiencing lots of hot and dry weather with no sign of frost in the near future. Fingers crossed, but if weather continues to cooperate there is going to be a province full of happy farmers with full bins.

As harvest is underway, producers are becoming more aware of volunteer varieties and other unwanted dockage in their crops. A windy harvest last year blew swaths all over fields and caused unwanted shelling of many commodities. Lots of these seeds germinated and grew into dockage this year. Flaman Grain Cleaning & Handling offers the answer to many of these situations, such as the Kwik Kleen grain cleaner. Whether you have volunteer flax in you oat crop or pesty Kochia growing in your wheat, the Kwik Kleen is designed to remove unwanted foreign material, as long as it can be sifted out.

Although the Kwik Kleen is not a “grain cleaner” in the sense that it is not designed to produce grain clean enough for seeding purposes, it can help clean out the bulk of smaller weed seeds from the larger sample. Kochia is a prime example of a weed seed that farmers would want to remove from their grain with a Kwik Kleen cleaner. Kochia’s high moisture content causes heating once it is mixed in a bin with other grains. This heating can ruin an entire bin full of grain, leaving it fairly useless to the farmer. The Kwik Kleen cleaner removes the Kochia from various grains like wheat, Durum, and other cereals by dropping it through a screen separation as it is augered through the Kwik Kleen before entering the bin.

I am pleased to say that in my opinion the future is looking bright for the 2013 crop year! Good luck to all the producers out there working from sunup to sundown and stay safe trying to get this year’s crop in the bin!

Happy Harvest
Mitch Flaman

 

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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with Grain Cleaning Harvest Kwik Kleen uses removing Kochia | More articles by Mitch Flaman

A Flaman Pro Grain Bagger? Yes Please!


Written By: Mark Flaman, Aug 15, 2013

The reasons for purchasing a grain bagger are obvious. If you're still hung up on the decision, I'll try and make it a little easier for you.

There has been quite a large shift over the past few years with farmers not being able to store all of the grain they yield in bins due to a really great harvest, so we're stuck with this problem. We need more storage, the grain bins are full, and the bin crews can't get out to the yard or it is impossible to even acquire more bins. The simple solution? Chuck the commodity in a giant plastic bag where it is not affected by weather or moisture changes, right in the same field it was harvested from. With the cost of grain bags dropping (0.6c / bushel) it's becoming much more mainstream, and I think we can expect to see more and more bags in the field as time goes on.

There are a couple more main reasons for bagging. If you've got combines in different fields during a great year for harvest such as 2013, chances are you're going to be running trucks full time and putting wear on them just to keep up with the combines and getting the commodity into the bins. With a grain bagger, you can just drive over to the bagger in the same field with the grain cart or combine, unload into the bagger, and it'll sit there until you either have bin storage available to dry the grain, or until you'd like to haul it to the terminal. Remember that these grain bags don't fluctuate in moisture content, whatever you put in will come out the same way.

If bin storage space is an issue, we see a lot of our customers using grain rings with tarps, but they let in moisture and whatever grain is sitting on the ground is sure to spoil at some point. You can keep the grain in a bag for even two years, and be able to pull it out and haul it away.

All in all, the way we're farming changes every year, and bagging grain is something that is becoming extremely common. We carry the Flaman Pro Grain Bagger at all of our mainline locations, and the bags to go with them as well. Need the extractor to take the grain out? We sell those too, both new and refurbished. For more information and specifications of the Flaman Pro Grain Bagger, please visit www.Flaman.com.

 

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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with grain bagger grain bags bag bagger flaman flaman pro grain bagger agriculture grain storage alternative bin storage | More articles by Mark Flaman

The Hidden Benefits of OPI


Written By: Mark Flaman, Jul 10, 2013

    With moisture accuracy within one tenth of a percent and temperature down to one Fahrenheit, OPI Temperature and Moisture monitoring systems have become the industry standard in grain monitoring over the past quarter-century. Most of us are aware about the savings and efficiency of the system, but there are a ton of other features that are often not mentioned.

    For instance, you're travelling down south during the winter months and you haven't got a clue what's happening back at the homestead. All of the sudden, you get an alarm on your cell phone that tells you grain is being drained from one of your bins. If you haven't scheduled a truck to pick any of it up, chances are there is a theft underway. Now all you've got to do is call a brother or a cousin to go check things out. For most people, this is a fantasy but it has recently become a reality with the Integris system by OPI. It monitors the levels of grain in your bins, and can be set up to send you a text message or e-mail when grain is being drawn, if grain is overheating or if it's getting too wet or dry.

    The system can also handle the automatic drying of grain if it's hooked up to a fan control that the system supplies. Basically, you tell the software what type of grain is in which bin, what temperature and moisture levels you want the grain at, and the system will automatically kick the fan on at certain times to ensure that your commodity is emptied in your ideal condition. An example would be the drying / rehydrating of soybeans. We've seen cases where a customer will fill a bin of soybeans with a moisture content of between ten and nineteen percent, and will end up with a final moisture content of between thirteen and fourteen percent, thus securing their premium.

    The system can also be outfitted with a mobile weather station that measures different aspects of the outdoor ambient weather, and calculates when the optimal time to heat or dry grain would be. In any case, you're looking for the most effective way to monitor all aspects of your grain, not just the temperature. We have a team of experts and installers on staff to get you outfitted with the best setup for your bin yard. CLICK HERE for more information and specs on all of the grain monitoring equipment we sell.

 

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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with opi systems grain monitoring grain setup moisture temperature monitoring software | More articles by Mark Flaman

On the Road with Flaman Grain Cleaning


Written By: Mitch Flaman, Grain CleaningMay 27, 2013

Although we thought it would never come, it’s beginning to look a lot like summer on the prairies. The snow is finally gone and the drills seem to be making the last few laps as seeding is wrapping up in many areas. 

After what seemed to be an eternity, I’ve completed a Bachelor of Commerce degree at the University of Saskatchewan and couldn’t be happier to get full swing into being a part of the team in the Grain Cleaning and Handling Division at Flaman Group of Companies. Although I have a lot to learn about the industry, I couldn’t be happier to get on the road and start building relationships with the customers we continue to serve and value.
 
Over the past few weeks, I have been on the road visiting various producers and processing facilities province-wide, trying to get a grasp of what is happening in the fields. It is evident that some areas are, without a doubt, feeling the effects of the large amount of snow Mother Nature dealt us this past winter. West of Saskatoon appears to be wetter than ever before. Many sloughs have turned into miniature lakes and some highways, specifically Highway 14, are even experiencing sections with water flowing over the road.
 
Other areas that didn’t get hit as hard with the snow, such as the southwest part of the province in Leader, are wrapping up seeding and hoping for some rain. It’ll be interesting to see the quality of the crops in the different regions as they start to sprout.
 
I’m especially looking forward to being part of a company concentrated on customer service and delivering relationship-focused results. Good luck in the up and coming growing season and I hope to see you around. Please check off June 19-21 on your calendars and swing by the Flaman booth at Canada’s Farm Progress Show in Regina to say hi!
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Posted in Division News | Tagged with grain cleaning seeding Flaman summer Farm Progress Show | More articles by Mitch Flaman

The secret behind cleaning grain with indent cylinder machines


Written By: Roy Ritchie, Grain Cleaning DivisionAug 22, 2012

The indent cylinder machine is designed primarily to separate grain by kernel length. It separates long kernels from shorter ones. The cylinder itself is a thin-walled tube with indents formed on the inside to the shape of a hemisphere. These indents are known as pockets.

By using indent pocket size, the kernels that fit into the pocket are lifted up and dropped into a trough that runs the entire length of the cylinder, while the longer kernels slide off and tail out the end. Indent pocket sizes are measured in 64ths of an inch similar to screen sizes used on screen machines. These cylinders are case hardened to give them a longer life span. Cylinders not hardened would wear out very quickly.

The cylinder always lifts up the shorter product that fits into the pocket and always tails off longer kernel; shorter from longer! A smaller pocket like a #13 will lift small weeds like buckwheat while tailing out wheat, while a larger pocket like a # 20 will lift wheat and tail out wild oats. Using combinations of different indent pocket sizes can do very fine separations of these products.

Indents use a combination of pocket size, centrifugal force, friction and gravity to make separations possible. By using different pocket sizes, particles of a certain size are able to be lifted off. The speed that the cylinder turns creates friction and centrifugal force that hold the particle in place. As the cylinder turns, that particle is lifted to a point where gravity takes over and allows the kernel to fall into a collection trough.

Speed of the cylinder is critical: too fast and the kernel is carried too far; too slow and gravity drops the product before reaching the collection trough.  Usually indent speeds are between 42 and 58 RPM. One or two RPMs can make a huge difference in separation and capacity.

The receiving trough catches and carries the lifted kernel to the end of the machine and discharges them into a spout. This trough is adjustable in order to make the cut or separation at the exact point of the particle size variation desired. The separation of the products usually happens between 60 and 45 degrees ahead of top dead centre.

Due to the fact that various seeds have different moisture, surface conditions, and specific gravity it is important to be able to hold the cylinder at a constant speed. Any fluctuations in speed will affect the actual trough adjustment and therefore the separations.

While feed flow and constant cylinder speed are critical, the unit is no better than the person running it. If you take time to understand the operation of the unit and allow a reasonable time after making adjustments you will find that the indent cylinder, regardless of make will do a good job for you. It will do this with minimal attention and service for a long period of time.

We at Flaman have several models and makes of indents available for sale. We are here to help.

This is one man’s opinion...

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with grain cleaning indent cylinder grain kernel Flaman grain sorting | More articles by Roy Ritchie

New to the Industry


Written By: Sheldon Ball, Grain CleaningMar 07, 2012

As a new employee at Flaman Sales, and a new resident to Saskatchewan, I’m excited to be starting a new career in the grain cleaning industry. With a background in the field of computer technology, I’m definitely starting from square one. Being new to the field is a little daunting, but I hope my “fresh” perspective can provide valuable insights and new ideas.

With the problem of ergot across the prairies over the last few years, there has been an ever increasing demand for efficient and effective grain cleaning. Ergot is a fungus which is toxic. It can cause infertility in humans and animals in fairly small doses and can cause a host of other health issues including death. Color sorters have been proven to be excellent tools to engage this problem with.
 
They are capable of removing almost all of the ergot from contaminated loads of grain. Since the tolerance level of ergot in the market (for wheat) ranges from about 0.04% to 0.01% depending on the spec, these machines are very necessary in sorting grain to a saleable product.
 
This is where I fit in. I have been hired as the new color sorter field technician. Basically, these machines are designed to separate “good” grain from “unwanted” grain. These machines are full of electronic, mechanical, and pneumatic components. The high flow machines are capable of sorting up to 25 tonnes of grain per hour. Flaman primarily sells two models; the Alphascan II and the Evolution. The Alphascan II is a monochromatic machine which is excellent for sorting high volumes of product with color differences in one light spectrum. These are the work horses for dealing with ergot. The Evolution is a full color sorting machine which is best utilized for sorting product with many different colored defects.
 
From what I’ve seen, both of these machines are phenomenal sorters and I’m excited to be a part of the industry which is providing better, cleaner products to the world’s markets. I’ll be traveling all over the prairies this year making sure these machines are in tip top shape and making their owners (our customers) money. I’m looking forward to meeting all existing customers and hopefully some new ones as well.
 
-Sheldon
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Posted in Division News | Tagged with Grain Cleaning and Handling Colour Sorter Ergot | More articles by Sheldon Ball

Operation of a Air Screen Grain Cleaner


Written By: Roy Ritchie, Grain Cleaning SalesJan 27, 2012

Operation of an Air and Screen

As the name implies, air screen machines use a combination of suction air that is drawn through the curtain of grain as it falls from the hopper onto a series of screens. The screens then size the product by width of the kernel, and a final air suction process is used.

With an air screen, the grain is fed onto the screens by either a vibrating feed system or by using a metered feed roll. In either case a feed gate controls the flow and an even flow is given to the machine. Making sure there is an even flow is critical to the quality of the job to be done.

As the grain falls from the feed system onto the screens, there is a process by which air is drawn through the curtain of grain. By doing so, light grain, chaff and dirt are drawn off the product before the grain touches the screens. The air mixed with dirt etc. is drawn into an expansion chamber where the chaff etc. separate and the heavy material is augured out. This process is the first thing that happens and it is also the last process as the grain leaves the machine. Increasing or decreasing the air volume allows the operator to decide how much product he wishes to remove.

Screens size the kernels by width. A system of screens removes any product that is wider than the kernel chosen [scalping], or narrower than the product chosen [sifting]. Screens are generally measured in 64ths of an inch, For example a 5.5 round would be a sifting screen for flax and would be 5 and ½ 64ths of an inch in diameter.

There are several types of screens available in perforated steel. Round hole, slotted hole, and triangular hole are the ones generally used for grain cleaning. There are also a variety of wire mesh screens available for special use. The type of grain dictates the type of screen.

We at Flaman have over 100 years of combined experience in screens, over 55 sizes of screen material in stock, and are dedicated to offering our customers top notch service.

This is one man’s point of view…

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with Grain Cleaning and Handling air screen grain cleaner sieve sift scalf | More articles by Roy Ritchie

2012 Crop Production Show a success


Written By: Barrett Prokopie, Operations ManagerJan 17, 2012

Nearly 20,000 people from all over the province, country and globe converged on Saskatoon for the 2012 Western Canadian Crop Production Show, one of Western Canada’s premier showcase events for the grain industry.

This year’s Crop Production Show not only experienced record attendance (up 15% from 2011) but a general optimism across the grain industry as producers, manufacturers and industry representatives reflected on a previous year of challenges and hope for a year of good weather and strong agriculture markets.

The Flaman Group of Companies was there, set up across Prairieland Park in three separate booths, staffed by both Flaman sales members and product specialists. Our Grain Cleaning, Grain Handling and Farm Hardware booths were fully stocked and ready to provide the level of service you see in our stores.
 
One of the biggest draws to the Flaman booths was our OPI Grain Monitoring. It seems that producers, big and small, are starting to see the benefits of a system that monitors temperature. And with the “Free Install” promotion running for the month of January, it is a real “no-brainer” to start monitoring your biggest asset…….the grain in your bin.
 
All in all, the 2012 Western Canadian Crop Production Show was a success and we are looking forward to a strong 2012 for Flaman Sales and Rentals. We would like to take the time to wish you the best of luck in 2012, thank you for all the support in 2011, and remind you that your local Flaman sales representative is ready and waiting to help you in any way he/she can.
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Posted in Division News | Tagged with crop production show trade show OPI cables grain industry | More articles by Barrett Prokopie

Gearing up for another winter in Western Canada


Written By: Flaman Grain Cleaning, Grain Cleaning SalesDec 14, 2011

Another winter is among us! Combines are put away, fall work is done (we hope), and the cows are coming home. Here at Flaman we are looking forward to another grain cleaning season. I am really looking forward to getting on the road to see as many people as possible that are cleaning, or are thinking about cleaning their own grain. After an above average harvest in most areas of Saskatchewan and Alberta there is one thing on most people’s mind, Ergot. There was a number of ergot issues ranging from North Battleford all the way to Edmonton and as far south as Medicine Hat. This means busy times for Colour Sorters in Saskatchewan and Alberta. At Flaman Grain Cleaning and Handling we are offering free colour sorter demos where you can bring in your own sample and watch the Satake Colour Sorter do its’ magic! The Western Canadian Crop Production Show is back in Saskatoon from January 9th – 12th, 2012. I will be making my way down the Yellowhead to Edmonton on January 11th – 13th, 2012 for the Alberta Seed Cleaning convention taking place at the Westin Hotel. This is a first time show for myself and I am very excited to see the people behind the Co-op Seed Cleaning Plants of Alberta. Christmas is coming fast so make sure to get that Christmas shopping done and have a very safe and happy holiday season!

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with Grain Cleaning and Handling Colour Sorter Ergot Winter Saskatchewan Winder Alberta | More articles by Flaman Grain Cleaning

What is Ergot?


Written By: Roy Ritchie, Grain Cleaning SalesDec 12, 2011

Ergot is a type of fungus that grows on many grasses, rye, wheat, barley, and triticale.It infects the floret of the grass or cereal and mimics the process of pollinated grain growing on the plant. On ergot infected plants, a spore destroys the ovary, and then connects to the plant by attaching itself to the plant’s seed nutrition system. An infected floret can also infect other florets by insect dispersal of the asexual spores. That means that an insect can carry millions of the spores to other plants in the region. When mature ergot drops to the ground the fungus remains dormant until proper conditions trigger its fruiting phase, germinate and re-infest an area.

Ergot is toxic. Infestations in the grain can cause spontaneous abortions in people and animals, as well as some very unpleasant symptoms. It can cause irrational behavior, seizures, convulsions, unconsciousness, even death. This explains why there is almost zero tolerance for ergot in grain for sale. Much of the grain should not even be fed to animals. Point zero one [.01%] percent is all that is allowed for a #1 specification.

Ergot has infected a wide area in Saskatchewan and Alberta over the last few years. Some places have had the infestation 3 or more years in a row with various areas having ergot at 0.7% and higher. It is getting worse. My personal belief is that it is here to stay. Some years will be better than others but it will always be a market factor. Plant scientists don’t even have a straight answer to this problem. There is a wide difference of opinion. Maybe a prolonged dry spell will reduce the amount but as soon as it rains at the right time again we are back to ergot woes.

This is only one man’s opinion…
Next installment, how do we proceed? Colour Sorters vs. Gravity Tables.  

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with Grain Cleaning and Handling Colour Sorter Ergot | More articles by Roy Ritchie

Customer Appreciation Event in Prince Albert


Written By: Jennifer Thompson, Marketing DivisionJun 20, 2011

Are you interested in the next generation of farm processes and grain management? Want to win some prizes?

Then stop by Flaman Sales in Prince Albert on Tuesday June 28 for a day of exciting product demonstrations. You can see the Flaman Pro Grain Bagger and Pro Grain Extractor in action, and learn all about J&M Grain Carts. It will be fun and educational!
 
This is all part of Flaman Sales’ Customer Appreciation Open House, which will be showcasing many other agriculture products such as Opi grain monitoring, bin aeration solutions and a Kioti tractor obstacle course. There will also be raffles and great prizes available to be won, plus burgers and refreshments! All proceeds from food sales will go to the Prince Albert Women’s Shelter. A special donation will also be made to the shelter from the Frank Flaman Foundation.
 
“Flaman Sales wanted to show our customers how much we appreciate them with a day of demos, food and fun,” says Barrett Prokopie, Operations Manager at the Prince Albert store. “This is truly a way to showcase our products and spectacular staff, and get the producers out to discuss their wants and needs, and play our part in the community.”
 
Flaman Sales will have suppliers, product specialists and leasing representatives on hand to answer any questions producers may have and to lend a helping hand. So come on down for a good time!
 
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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with Flaman agriculture equipment demonstrations prizes charity BBQ grain bagger J&M Carts | More articles by Jennifer Thompson

Western Canada Farm Progress Show


Written By: Mitch Flaman, Grain Cleaning DivisionMay 26, 2011

The Flaman Grain Cleaning and Handling Division would once again like to welcome you to join us at the Western Canada Farm Progress Show in Regina, Saskatchewan. The show starts June 15th and ends June 17th

Come out and learn about cutting edge technology, emerging trends, and ever-changing demographics. Learn how to combat the unpredictable weather patterns we have been seeing and maximize efficiency on your farm this year. Swing by our booths and take advantage of the innovative solutions we have to offer you such as colour sorters to remove ergot from wheat or the Will-Rich Vertical Tiller to help keep you stay afloat.

Flaman Grain Cleaning and Handling Division will be displaying our newest addition to the vast line of products that we offer, the Light Foot Cleaning Machine. The Light Foot is a simple and compact air/screen grain cleaner, great for “on the farm” use.

Come and see us at the show for more details and don’t forget to enter your name into our draw for a 12-piece dockage testing kit. That’s right, we’re giving away a 12-piece hand-tester sieve kit set to your specifications to test your various commodities. See you at the show!

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Posted in Division News | Tagged with Western Canada Farm Progress Show Flaman Grain Cleaning Light Foot Cleaner Hand Sieve Draw | More articles by Mitch Flaman