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Monitoring stored grain is an important task


Written By: Cory Jacob, regional crop specialistDec 20, 2016


Monitoring and appropriate management of stored grain (especially tough and damp grain) is essential to ensuring that grain will not spoil and will remain in good shape during storage.
Grain needs to be monitored while in storage, as no monitoring can lead to drastic losses, especially when a good portion of grain was harvested as damp and tough.
Grain moisture content and temperature are two important factors that affect grain storage.
Dry grain can spoil if the seed temperature is too high and grain initially within safe moisture and temperature levels can still spoil due to hot spots forming and moisture migration within the grain bin.
Grain acts like an insulator and can hold temperatures for a fair amount of time if left undisturbed. Actually, it is not uncommon for larger bins to have grain temperatures in the centre that have not changed much since harvest, though it is close to freezing outside the bin.
Moisture migration occurs when warm and or moist grain in the bin is at a warmer temperature than the temperature outside the bin, as a result cold air moves down the interior of the bin to the bottom of the grain mass and is drawn to the centre of the bin by an upward flow of warmer air.
As the cold air is drawn up the grain, it warms and flows to the surface of the grain. The warm air is cooled as it reaches the surface, condenses, and the cycle repeats. The condensation that occurs at the top of the grain creates a high moisture zone that is prone to spoilage and mold growth. Some fungal species can grow at relatively low seed moisture contents, and their growth results in the production of moisture, which allows other more harmful fungal species to develop.
Grain spoilage is relatively undetectable in early stages. Cooling the grain to under minus eight degrees Celsius will deactivate mold growth. For insects, temperatures below 18 degrees Celsius limit their movement and reproduction.
In the fall or winter, moving the grain during cold weather can help to decrease the temperature in the bin, eliminating hot spots and can kill grain storage insects depending how much the grain temperature is lowered and for how long.
A variety of methods exist to monitor stored grain; a monitor that continually records the temperature of the stored grain is the best indicator of how long the grain will store for. If a rapid temperature increase occurs, immediate action needs to be taken.
Management practices include cooling grain to within five degrees Celsius of the outside air temperature as soon as possible as this will equalize the temperature within the bin. Using aeration or moving grain will help to accomplish this.
As the outside temperature cools, you may wish to cool the grain until it is close to or below freezing for winter storage. Monitor multiple times a week for changes in grain temperature. Pay close attention to grain in large bins and grain bags, especially where grain is tough and damp. –
 
See more at: http://www.weyburnthisweek.com/news/monitoring-stored-grain-is-an-important-task-1.3523115

© Copyright Weyburn This Week 2016



Author Cory Jacob holds MSc. and BSc. in agronomy from the University of Saskatchewan. He has held various agronomy-related summer jobs in private industry, and also has experience as a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Saskatchewan. Cory works closely with producers and industry to help alleviate current and future issues in crop production. Cory grew up on a grain farm in southeast Saskatchewan in the Mutrie district.


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Posted in Ag news | Tagged with grain monitoring agriculture moisture temperature cables | More articles by Cory Jacob

Grain movement is going well


Written By: Eric Anderson, Jul 22, 2015

Qurom is reporing that . . . .

Stocks in Store
• Country stocks this week remained at 2.9 MMT utilizing 69% of the system’s working capacity. Space in
elevators is good. Producer deliveries to primary elevators were 0.8 MMT in Week 49.
• Total western port terminal stocks increased to 1.0 MMT this week, utilizing 57% of the working capacity.
 

Railway Car Supply
• Railcar allocation plans were supplied by CN to Week 51 while CP’s allocation has been calculated using
monthly reports to week 17. (see page 3 for details) Shippers report that rail service and order fulfillment
continues to meet demand to Western Ports. Car allocation to Churchill is underway.

Shipments
• Year to date Western Canadian shipments from port terminal elevators at Week 49 are 23% higher than the
same period last year and 29% higher than the 5-year average.

 

Full story at http://www.grainmonitor.ca/Downloads/WeeklyReports/GMPGOCWeek49.pdf

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with quorum grain monitoring program rail elevators grain handling | More articles by Eric Anderson

Bin Sense: Secure Your Harvest


Written By: Flaman, Marketing and Communications CoordinatorMay 09, 2014
We all know, in order to prevent grain spoilage, you must keep it at the proper temperature and keep the moisture level low. Millions of dollars are lost every year due to grain spoilage. Intra Grain has a solution to this issue and it is called Bin Sense. Bin Sense monitors your grain 24/7 and, every hour, can wirelessly send you an update on the condition of your grain. This takes the guesswork and risk out of grain storage. Bin Sense not only monitors moisture levels but monitors grain levels as well within the bin so that if theft occurs, you will be notified.
 
The whole Bin Sense Monitoring system is easy to install and even easier to operate. It uses a magnetic mount at the top of your bin, which makes set up/removal simple. Each unit has been highly tested and does not require the use of a power source because it is entirely solar powered with a backup battery. No struggling with extension cords or generators.
 

On Intra Grain’s website, you are able to request a quote and read more about the products and technology. Check it out http://intragrain.com

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Posted in New Products | Tagged with bin sense intragrain grain monitoring wireless | More articles by Flaman

The Hidden Benefits of OPI


Written By: Mark Flaman, Jul 10, 2013

    With moisture accuracy within one tenth of a percent and temperature down to one Fahrenheit, OPI Temperature and Moisture monitoring systems have become the industry standard in grain monitoring over the past quarter-century. Most of us are aware about the savings and efficiency of the system, but there are a ton of other features that are often not mentioned.

    For instance, you're travelling down south during the winter months and you haven't got a clue what's happening back at the homestead. All of the sudden, you get an alarm on your cell phone that tells you grain is being drained from one of your bins. If you haven't scheduled a truck to pick any of it up, chances are there is a theft underway. Now all you've got to do is call a brother or a cousin to go check things out. For most people, this is a fantasy but it has recently become a reality with the Integris system by OPI. It monitors the levels of grain in your bins, and can be set up to send you a text message or e-mail when grain is being drawn, if grain is overheating or if it's getting too wet or dry.

    The system can also handle the automatic drying of grain if it's hooked up to a fan control that the system supplies. Basically, you tell the software what type of grain is in which bin, what temperature and moisture levels you want the grain at, and the system will automatically kick the fan on at certain times to ensure that your commodity is emptied in your ideal condition. An example would be the drying / rehydrating of soybeans. We've seen cases where a customer will fill a bin of soybeans with a moisture content of between ten and nineteen percent, and will end up with a final moisture content of between thirteen and fourteen percent, thus securing their premium.

    The system can also be outfitted with a mobile weather station that measures different aspects of the outdoor ambient weather, and calculates when the optimal time to heat or dry grain would be. In any case, you're looking for the most effective way to monitor all aspects of your grain, not just the temperature. We have a team of experts and installers on staff to get you outfitted with the best setup for your bin yard. CLICK HERE for more information and specs on all of the grain monitoring equipment we sell.

 

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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with opi systems grain monitoring grain setup moisture temperature monitoring software | More articles by Mark Flaman