Flaman Rentals Blog

Canadian economy grows again, pointing to stronger second half

Posted by Eric Anderson Sep 30, 2015

The Globe and Mail

The Canadian economy posted its second straight month of impressive growth in July, strengthening the case that the country’s economic fortunes have turned a corner following a trying first half of the year.

Statistics Canada reported that Canada’s real gross domestic product grew by 0.3 per cent month-over-month in July, building on the 0.4-per-cent growth posted in June. The two-month upturn marks a sharp reversal from the first five months of the year, when the economy contracted each month, bogged down by the impact of the oil shock and an unusually harsh winter. After a cumulative GDP decline of 0.9 per cent over the first five months of 2015, the economy has now rebounded by nearly 0.8 per cent over the past two months of data.


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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with GDP Canadian economy economic reports | More articles by Eric Anderson


Canadian wheat, canola, and durum export destinations

Posted by Eric Anderson Aug 17, 2015

Statistics Canada released our grain export destinations for June 2015 today.  Below are the total quarterly Canadian exports for three major crops (including June 2015):

 

 


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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with wheat canola durum Canadian exports | More articles by Eric Anderson


29 varieties to be removed CWRS and CPSR classes

Posted by Eric Anderson Jul 30, 2015

The list includes formerly popular varieties such as Katepwa, Harvest and Kane

The Canadian Grain Commission has announced that as of August 1, 2017, 29 varieties will no longer be eligible for of Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) and Canada Prairie Spring Red (CPSR) wheat classes.


The list (below) of 25 CWRS and four CPSR varieties includes formerly popular varieties such as Katepwa, Harvest and Kane as well as Neepawa, which was once the check variety for the CWRS class.

 

The full story is here http://www.agcanada.com/daily/29-varieties-to-be-removed-cwrs-and-cpsr-classes


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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with wheat canadian grain commission CWRS CPSR | More articles by Eric Anderson


QAI Podcast

Posted by Steve Whittington Aug 22, 2014

QAIIn this episode of Trailer Talk Kevin Tsumura speaks about the Canadian pre-clearance program for trailers. Steve also asks Kevin about the risks consumers face when the purchasing from US retailers that do not have to comply with the program. If you thinking about buying state side you should listen and learn.


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Posted in Podcasts | Tagged with Podcasts Canadian | More articles by Steve Whittington


Why built in Canada still matters

Posted by Steve Whittington Jul 25, 2014

Trailtech TD 210It was a Friday.  I was at our Nisku location and I was leaving the dealership walking through the lot headed home for the weekend. I walked past a Trailtech TD 210 that had a few  modified options on it. I looked the trailer over as I always do when walk past any unit in our yard. As I walked along the length of the unit from taillights to hitch I noted the features, fit and finish, quality of build, overall appearance, etc, etc, etc…when I reached the hitch  I saw this trailer had just gone through our pre-delivery inspection process (as the sticker slapped on the front of the gooseneck indicated).  I then stopped and looked back down the length of the trailer.

“This is a damn fine trailer”  I thought to myself.  So  I took a closer look at the welds and the convenience features on the unit (some installed by us).  I started to really critic the unit looking at the decking for cracks and other imperfections; I looked under the frame at the paint coverage; I followed the wiring harness (note I wrote wiring harness not strand wiring) along the frame paying attention to how it was secured and protected.  Everything on this trailer was perfect. No matter how hard I looked I could not find any problems with the trailer.  Quite honestly, this is not an exception to the rule, it is the rule: Trailtech product has outstanding consistent quality. 

Call me bias (Trailtech is Canadian built, and a brand FGC has a longstanding history with) but I believe the quality that goes into to trailers built in Canada, for Canadian conditions is underappreciated. To address this I decided to give you reasons as a Canadian consumer why you should buy a Canadian built Trailtech.

1)      Quality of Build.  As in many products there are a good, better and best for light industrial trailers. At Flaman Group of Companies  we sell products that fit into all three categories in order to meet the various needs of various customers.  These categories are differentiated by features and quality which ultimately means different pricing.  Trailtech as a brand offers a good, better and best  models for each category. Where I believe they really shine (and customers have been voting this way with their dollars) is in the best category.  The Premier and Industrial series generally have no equal in the market place.  If you need a reliable trailer as a tool for your business, to me it makes sense to invest in a Trailtech that will always do what you need and last the test of time.

2)      Canadian weather and road conditions. They are awful, both our roads and our weather and many trailer brands are built for the warm flat highways of the southern states as opposed to the gravel and pitted frozen highways of the Canadian north.  For these conditions you need paint that can absorb some of the mechanical impact of road rocks at -40 and a RV plug that will not shatter when you fight to plug it into your tow vehicle.   Trailtech based in Gravelburg SK lives in and understands these conditions.  A Trailtech trailer is made to deal with this weather without fuss.

3)      Warranty: We sell thousands of Trailtech products every year.  They get horribly abused by some customers (another story) and yet we rarely hear of any issues. That said no company is perfect.  The product is built by people and people make mistakes (as we all do).  What defines a product and company is what they do when that happens. It has been my experience that between Trailtech and Flaman when a mistake happens that affects the customer,  the Trailtech and Flaman people always make it right.

Lastly Americans market buy American all the time to support American companies and American workers. Let me be shameless and proudly yell the same thing: Buy Canadian!  Yes I am a hypocrite as we sell many American brands across many of our divisions( including the Trailer Division).  Being a leader in retail we need to provide the leading products in their appropriate categories in order to provide the best customer experience to our customers. That said, there are Canadian products that we sell that are the best in their categories (Trailtech is one of them)…Buy Canadian and support Canadians.

 So if you are in the market for your first trailer or are adding one to your fleet. Think about Canadian quality.  Quality comes with a cost but I believe it is worth it.

Trailtech TD 210 custom option

 


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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with Trailtech Flatdeck Canadian built Trailers dump trailers ag transport | More articles by Steve Whittington


So many Sled Trailers but what should you choose?

Posted by Steve Whittington Nov 24, 2011

This season the diversity of choice for a sled trailer can be daunting. There are many brands, different dealers, options and types to choose from. 

Let me try to take you through the choices with a bunch of comparison points as follows: Canadian versus American, steel versus aluminum, open versus enclosed, enclosed 7 wide versus 8.5 ft wide deck over, heated versus not heated and dealer versus dealer.
 
1)      Canadian versus American. Let me start by writing “buy Canadian eh” whenever possible. There, I put it in writing. Not to get political but come on, if you can, support a Canadian company. That said, of the Canadian brands that provide sled trailers, the two leading players are Southland Trailers with their XR Series and Trailtech with their heavy duty steel trailers. There are others in the West notably Rainbow Trailers, Agassiz Trailers and CJay Trailers; however, their choice offering is less than the leading two. That said, the American companies do a good job, the problem is how fluid the industry is. Many companies rise and fall quite quickly (such as Pace American which recently shut its doors). Despite this, competition in the US is thick and there are all kinds of options to choose from, but beware of what you are buying and from whom. At Flaman Trailers we partner with the two leading Canadian companies and several American companies to round out our offering.
 
2)      Steel versus aluminum. The debate rages, but there are some simple facts. Aluminum is lighter and does not rust, but it costs about a 1/3 more. Steel is stronger and on an enclosed unit it is only the tip of the trailer and the tail that is really going to show any rust. On an open deck there is a little more exposure.  With the weight factor, several hundred pounds with a regular pick up makes a heck of a difference for hauling. For instance a two place aluminum open can weigh as little as 480 lb., while a two place steel open can weigh as much as 1345 lb.
 
3)      Open versus enclosed. To be honest, it comes down to available storage, usage and budget. If you have lots of room to store your trailers in for the summer, there’s no need for an enclosed trailer otherwise. As for usage, how many a times a year will you be trailering and how far? Do you need an enclosed staging area? The amount of time you have to spend cleaning grime off your sled gets older every time. That being said, if you are hauling only a few times or short distances, get an open deck trailer, save some money and put it into your sled.
 
4)      Enclosed lowboy/7 ft wide versus enclosed 8.5 ft wide deck over. Traditionally, if you wanted to haul sleds in Canada you purchased an 8.5’ wide deck over trailer. Your sleds parked side by side and loading and unloading was easy through the rear and front ramp. The 8.5’ wide deck over trailers, while convenient for loading, are big and if you have a steel frame trailer you need a big truck to haul your big trailer. Lowboy and 7 ft wide trailers are easier to pull and the 7 ft wide is a more convenient multi-use trailer in the off season than the 8.5 ft deck over. You can also see around the 7 wide and 8 wide lowboys with your mirrors when hauling. But loading is tricky, and you will not be walking in your trailer when loaded, there simply is no room.  
 
5)      Heated versus not heated. To heat or not to heat is a question many a customer has. The benefits of heat are obvious, but are you going to use it enough to justify the added expense? Only you can be the judge of that.
 
6)      Dealer versus dealer. There are many dealers selling sled trailers. Your choices are many but should be made based on product knowledge, service and after sales support – not price! The trailers are all priced differently for a reason. If something is less or more at different dealers it is due to features, product quality and support the dealership offers.  Educate yourself and purchase from a professional that will help you choose the best sled trailer for you.
 
Hope this helps!

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Posted in Trailer Tips | Tagged with snowmobile trailers sled trailers trailer open flat deck enclosed highboy lowboy deck over steel aluminum Canadian | More articles by Steve Whittington