Flaman Rentals Blog

NDVI Drones

Posted by Jonathan Hutchinson May 30, 2017

ndvi imaging uk

Aerial imaging can be used as a good indicator of crop health. The emergence of drone technology makes this process more affordable, and accessible. A drone accompanied with a remote sensor, and the NDVI graphical indicator, is all you need to gain useful information on the health of your crop.
 
The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is a simple graphical indicator that can be used to analyze remote sensing measurements, typically but not necessarily from a space platform, and assess whether the target being observed contains live green vegetation or not.
 
NDVI was one of the most successful of many attempts to simply and quickly identify vegetated areas and their "condition," and it remains the most well-known and used index to detect live green plant canopies in multi-spectral remote sensing data. Once the feasibility to detect vegetation had been demonstrated, users tended to also use the NDVI to quantify the photosynthetic capacity of plant canopies.
 
The basic principle of NDVI relies on the fact that, due to the spongy layers found on their backsides, leaves reflect a lot of light in the near infrared, in stark contrast with most non-plant objects. When the plant becomes dehydrated or stressed, the spongy layer collapses and the leaves reflect less NIR light, but the same amount in the visible range. Thus, mathematically combining these two signals can help differentiate plant from non-plant and healthy plant from sickly plant.
 
 
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Posted in Ag news | Tagged with drones ndvi aerial imaging crop health remote sensor | More articles by Jonathan Hutchinson


Monitoring stored grain is an important task

Posted by Cory Jacob Dec 20, 2016



Monitoring and appropriate management of stored grain (especially tough and damp grain) is essential to ensuring that grain will not spoil and will remain in good shape during storage.
Grain needs to be monitored while in storage, as no monitoring can lead to drastic losses, especially when a good portion of grain was harvested as damp and tough.
Grain moisture content and temperature are two important factors that affect grain storage.
Dry grain can spoil if the seed temperature is too high and grain initially within safe moisture and temperature levels can still spoil due to hot spots forming and moisture migration within the grain bin.
Grain acts like an insulator and can hold temperatures for a fair amount of time if left undisturbed. Actually, it is not uncommon for larger bins to have grain temperatures in the centre that have not changed much since harvest, though it is close to freezing outside the bin.
Moisture migration occurs when warm and or moist grain in the bin is at a warmer temperature than the temperature outside the bin, as a result cold air moves down the interior of the bin to the bottom of the grain mass and is drawn to the centre of the bin by an upward flow of warmer air.
As the cold air is drawn up the grain, it warms and flows to the surface of the grain. The warm air is cooled as it reaches the surface, condenses, and the cycle repeats. The condensation that occurs at the top of the grain creates a high moisture zone that is prone to spoilage and mold growth. Some fungal species can grow at relatively low seed moisture contents, and their growth results in the production of moisture, which allows other more harmful fungal species to develop.
Grain spoilage is relatively undetectable in early stages. Cooling the grain to under minus eight degrees Celsius will deactivate mold growth. For insects, temperatures below 18 degrees Celsius limit their movement and reproduction.
In the fall or winter, moving the grain during cold weather can help to decrease the temperature in the bin, eliminating hot spots and can kill grain storage insects depending how much the grain temperature is lowered and for how long.
A variety of methods exist to monitor stored grain; a monitor that continually records the temperature of the stored grain is the best indicator of how long the grain will store for. If a rapid temperature increase occurs, immediate action needs to be taken.
Management practices include cooling grain to within five degrees Celsius of the outside air temperature as soon as possible as this will equalize the temperature within the bin. Using aeration or moving grain will help to accomplish this.
As the outside temperature cools, you may wish to cool the grain until it is close to or below freezing for winter storage. Monitor multiple times a week for changes in grain temperature. Pay close attention to grain in large bins and grain bags, especially where grain is tough and damp. –
 
See more at: http://www.weyburnthisweek.com/news/monitoring-stored-grain-is-an-important-task-1.3523115

© Copyright Weyburn This Week 2016



Author Cory Jacob holds MSc. and BSc. in agronomy from the University of Saskatchewan. He has held various agronomy-related summer jobs in private industry, and also has experience as a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Saskatchewan. Cory works closely with producers and industry to help alleviate current and future issues in crop production. Cory grew up on a grain farm in southeast Saskatchewan in the Mutrie district.


See Grain Bins & Storage Solutions

See Grain Monitoring Systems


See how Grain Monitoring works! --> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6VDIdEcUeI

 
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Posted in Ag news | Tagged with grain monitoring agriculture moisture temperature cables | More articles by Cory Jacob


Tillage Equipment recruited to deal with moisture issues

Posted by Lee Hart Oct 21, 2016

Tillage recruited to deal with moisture issues

Necessity is the mother of invention, but weather appears to be the mother of necessity, these days. That seems to fit as producers talk about the need for tillage in this October Farmer Panel.

Largely in response to high residue levels, he says in some areas they are using a tandem disc and in others a vertical tillage tool.

“Tillage seems to be what a lot are looking at these days,” says Boles. “There is a bit of a craze going on to use some tillage. It’s all related to moisture in this area too. It was dry for many of the past 15 years, but since about 2010 we have had wetter seasons.” That contributed to excess moisture for seeding and harvest and big crops with plenty of residue.

Article By Lee Hart | GrainNews | October 18th 2016

SEE FULL ARTICLE







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Posted in Ag news | Tagged with Tillage Prairie Oct 2016 Breaking Discs Farming Grain News Flaman | More articles by Lee Hart


Is everybody ready for a potentially record setting crop?

Posted by Eric Anderson Jun 23, 2016

The potential for this year's crop to be a record setting event has been confirmed by the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS).  In a recent press release, APAS issued notice to rail companies to be prepared for what could be a large crop this year.  You can see their actual press release here.

APAS said it's anyone’s guess whether it will reach the record-setting levels farmers experienced in 2013 (38.4 million tonnes, according to Statistics Canada), but either way, APAS president Norm Hall wants rail companies to be ready.  “If you remember three years ago when we had the potential of a huge crop, and turned out to be the largest crop on record, the railroads used the excuse that oh, we didn’t know this was coming, we weren’t prepared for it,” explained Hall in an interview with News Talk Radio.

So, APAS is asking the railroads to be ready to handle the grain - but they are the end of the system - the system begins with farmers?

Are farmers ready to harvest the crop within the small window of opportunity presented by crop development and the weather.

Are the combine(s) fast enough? Are there enough trucks ready to move the grain to a bin or bagging area?  Maybe the ground is wet, so is a grain cart ready to move the grain off the field towards a truck, bin, or bagging area?  Is the bagger ready with enough bags? Are the transfers, augers or conveyors able to quickly unload the grain and move it, which allows for the combine to keep moving without having to wait for unloading?

And after moving the grain by rail, are the ports and ships ready?

APAS has put rail on notice, but what about the rest of the system?




 
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Posted in Crop reports | Tagged with harvest augers carts bins bagger | More articles by Eric Anderson


Vegetarian starts eating meat again, takes 40-minutes off her triathlon bike time

Posted by Eric Anderson Feb 03, 2016

Canada's fitness information leaderKathleen Trotter – took 40 minutes off her triathlon bike time when she started eating meat, after being a vegetarian for 18-years. So, she was already in great shape to complete a triathlon, then eating meat gave her an extra boost.

Kathleen revealed this during a CTV Morning Live Atlantic interview on February 1st.



Kathleen often states "knowledge is power" and during the interview she passed along that "protein is the building block of muscle."

On a side note, the more muscle you carry the more calories you burn while doing nothing.
Back to the interview.

Kathleen stated that when trying to lose weight it can be helpful to pick protein sources that are nutrient dense, are a complete protein, and come at a low caloric cost. Beef is a great nutrient dense and unprocessed option. During the interview she demonstrated that you only need to consume 180 calories of beef to get the same amount of protein as you would from 550 calories of humus, or 700 calories of peanut butter, black beans, or even quinoa (pronounced keen-wah).

Another way of looking at that would be, to get the same amount of protein, you need only eat a fraction of the calories by consuming beef. Think of it as the "caloric cost" of the protein your are acquiring.

Kathleen also noted that the sugar craving you may get at 3:00 pm, may be due to a lack of protein at lunch.

And, if all the details is confusing, just remember that a seasoned triathlete took 40-minutes off her bike time when she started eating meat after being a vegetarian for 18-years.

If you want to learn more, go to #beefadvantage or here
 
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Posted in Livestock | Tagged with beef beef advantage protein nutrition | More articles by Eric Anderson


New agriculture research chair now on the job

Posted by Eric Anderson Nov 13, 2015

13 Nov 2015
THE STARPHOENIX

New agriculture research chair now on the job

SASKATOON — The University of Saskatchewan has appointed a former student and adjunct professor as research chair in feed processing technology at the Canadian Feed Research Centre in North Battleford.
Rex Newkirk will collaborate with U of S plant and animal scientists to develop new feed and pet food products and new markets for Saskatchewan crops. The former vice-president of research and innovation at the Canadian International Grains Institute in Winnipeg will contribute to the valueadded segment of the province’s agricultural industry, according to a news release.

“Professor Newkirk is globally renowned in the processing of a wide variety of crop products to provide a myriad of end products,” College of Agriculture and Bioresources dean Mary Buhr said in a statement. “As the research lead for the U of S Canadian Feed Research Centre, he will drive integrating crop characteristics with processing features and nutritional availability in desirable end products.”
Newkirk’s tenure began Nov. 1 and will involve working with the Department of Animal and Poultry Science, the Crop Development Centre, Prairie Swine Centre and the Western College of Veterinary Medicine.
 
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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with research U of S ag | More articles by Eric Anderson


Used-grain bag rollers make clean-up easy and qualifies for rebate

Posted by Eric Anderson Nov 05, 2015

Used-grain bag rollers make clean-up easy and qualifies for rebate
 
The Arc Alloy Pro Grain Bag Roller Model 1510 from Flaman, allows you to quickly roll-up your used gran bags – it sort of turns the stretched out empty bag into a round bail.  A bumper pull or skid mount options can be added to the base model.
 

See it in action at:  https://youtu.be/4Q6rzkWe2bI
See it at http://www.flamanagriculture.com/pro-grain-bag-roller-p470
And, it qualifies for a 50% rebate* with a Saskatchewan Environmental farm Plan
For details on project eligibility and to download a rebate application, contact the Saskatchewan Financial Programs Branch at 1.877.874 or visit www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/Plastic-Grain-Bag-Roller-BMP
*50 per cent of eligible costs to a maximum of $5,000; all work must occur before January 31, 2018
 
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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with grain bag roller recycle efp | More articles by Eric Anderson


Optimism greets new Federal ag minister

Posted by Eric Anderson Nov 05, 2015

  • 5 Nov 2015
  • The StarPhoenix
  • ALEX MACPHERSON

Optimism greets new ag minister

Policies fit province’s goals

Despite his unfamiliarity with the Saskatchewan agriculture industry, incoming federal agriculture minister Lawrence MacAulay could bring good news for the province’s farmers, according to the president of the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan.
“A lot of their ag policies align very closely with a lot of the policies that we were putting out, and their answers were very close to what we wanted to hear,” Norm Hall said, referring to the Liberal party’s agriculture platform. “We’re very encouraged by what the Liberal government was putting out.”
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appointed 69-yearold potato farmer and veteran Prince Edward Island MP Lawrence MacAulay as agriculture minister on Wednesday. He replaces Gerry Ritz, the Conservative MP for Battlefords-Lloydminster, who has held the post since 2007.
While the agriculture minister has little impact on day-to-day farm and manufacturing operations, his influence on policy is enormous, Hall said.
“It’s huge. We’re all under some federal act, and there’s all kinds of updates that need to happen to Canadian laws and acts. In some cases they’re slow coming, and we need to convince government there’s a better way to do it.”
Grain transportation and international trade are particularly important for the new government to address because Saskatchewan producers rely on the country’s rail network and trade laws to get their grain into foreign markets, and both are in a state of flux, Hall said.
Canada’s Transportation Act is undergoing a major review, while a pair of major free trade agreements — the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement and the Trans-Pacific Partnership — are being negotiated. Hall expects MacAulay will throw his support behind both issues.

“We’re very hopeful about the future for ag under this government,” he said.
Saskatchewan’s agriculture minister takes a similarly optimistic view. Although he lacks the in-depth knowledge of Saskatchewan agriculture his predecessor possessed, MacAulay is a farmer and a veteran MP, meaning he should have little trouble acclimating to the role, Lyle Stewart said.
“He has quite a record, and a very positive one,” he said. “I’m quite looking forward to meeting him.”
Stewart said he hopes MacAulay will support the Trans-Pacific Partnership and pursue the outgoing Conservative government’s challenge of country of origin labelling at the World Trade Organization.
The Canadian Transportation Act review is also vital to Saskatchewan’s agriculture industry and broader economy, he added.
“We export virtually everything we produce, and the vast majority of it goes west, so rail transportation is critical to our economy. Certainly, having the right rules that motivate the railways to act in a responsible, efficient and highly-motivated fashion is important to us.”
Meanwhile, the Agriculture Council of Saskatchewan (ACS), which distributes federal dollars to industry-led projects, hopes the new government boosts its contributions to Western Canada.
“Funding programs and support for the agriculture sector helps growth, assists with growth, provides opportunities for growth,” ACS executive director Bryan Kosteroski said. “And also provides more opportunities for smaller agriculture companies to grow in Western Canada and in Saskatchewan.”
 
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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with agriculutre policy Federal minister | More articles by Eric Anderson


Most of farm file's handlers to return to Commons

Posted by Eric Anderson Oct 20, 2015

Most of farm file’s handlers to return to Commons

Trudeau's Liberals have former ag minister, critics on roster

From http://www.agcanada.com/daily/most-of-farm-files-handlers-to-return-to-commons
Most federal parliamentarians with experience in the agriculture and agri-food portfolio will be back in the House of Commons under a new majority Liberal government.
As of Tuesday morning, prime minister-elect Justin Trudeau’s Liberals were elected or leading in 184 of 338 seats, for a decisive majority following Monday’s federal election. Stephen Harper’s Conservatives return to opposition, elected or leading in 99 seats.
Thomas Mulcair’s New Democrats are demoted to second opposition, elected or leading in 44 seats, followed by the Bloc Quebecois in 10, and the Green Party, whose leader Elizabeth May hung onto the party’s lone seat.
The Liberals, who’d had just 34 seats after the 2011 election, will return to power with a largely rookie caucus, but their returning veterans carry years of experience on the agriculture file.
Ralph Goodale, the Liberals’ agriculture minister from 1993 to 1997 and minister for the Canadian Wheat Board from 1993 to 2003, easily held his riding of Regina-Wascana on Monday night by a spread of more than 10,000 votes over the Tories’ Michael Kram.
Goodale, who’d started his federal political career in 1974 as a rookie MP for then-prime minister Pierre Trudeau, returned to Regina in 1986 as leader of the provincial Liberals. He rose through cabinet during the Chretien administration and handled the finance file during Paul Martin’s short stint as prime minister (2003-06).
Paul Martin’s parliamentary secretary for agriculture and agri-food will also return to Ottawa. Wayne Easter, the MP for the Prince Edward Island riding of Malpeque since 1993, easily held his seat by a 10,003-vote margin over Tory candidate Stephen Stewart.
Easter, who led Canada’s National Farmers Union (NFU) for 11 years before entering politics, was the parliamentary ag secretary from 2003 to 2006. On the opposition benches, he served as the Liberals’ critic for agriculture and the CWB (2006-11) and for international trade (2011-13).
The Liberals’ incumbent agriculture and agri-food critic since 2013, Nova Scotia MP Mark Eyking, also returns to the Commons, handily winning his riding of Sydney-Victoria by over 24,800 votes over NDP contender Monika Dutt.
Eyking, who with his wife Pam farmed and earned the Outstanding Young Farmers of Nova Scotia award before he entered politics, also served as Martin’s parliamentary secretary for agriculture and agri-food (2003-04) and for international trade (2004-06). On the second opposition bench, Eyking also served as critic for foreign affairs (2007) and rural affairs (2010-11).
Among other files of interest to farmers, the Liberals’ critic for international trade, Toronto MP Chrystia Freeland, will return in the redrawn riding of University-Rosedale, while their transport critic, David McGuinty, held his riding of Ottawa South.
Opposition
The Conservatives head back to the opposition with most of their bench strength on the agriculture file intact, led by their incumbent agriculture minister Gerry Ritz.
Ritz on Monday easily held his western Saskatchewan riding of Battlefords-Lloydminster by a spread of more than 14,600 votes over NDP challenger Glenn Tait, a grain farmer involved in both the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission and the NFU.
Other Tory MPs well known for their work on the ag file will also return to the Commons on the opposition side, among them southern Ontario MP Bev Shipley (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex), the incumbent chair of the Commons’ standing committee on agriculture.
Previous ag critics and standing ag committee members such as Larry Maguire (Brandon-Souris, Man.), Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, Alta.), Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, Alta.), Larry Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, Ont.), Earl Dreeshen (Red Deer—Mountain View, Alta.), David Anderson (Cypress Hills—Grasslands, Sask.) and Randy Hoback (Prince Albert, Sask.) will also return for the Tories.
Harper’s minister of state for small business, tourism and agriculture (2013-15), veteran Quebec MP Maxime Bernier, also held his riding of Beauce by a spread of more than 20,000 votes over Liberal contender Adam Veilleux. Former parliamentary ag secretary (2006-07) Jacques Gourde held his riding of Levis-Lotbiniere by a spread of almost 18,000 votes over the Liberals’ Claude Boucher.
Tory MPs who lost their seats Monday include former parliamentary ag secretary Pierre Lemieux (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Ont.) and former New Brunswick ag minister Rodney Weston (Saint John-Rothesay, N.B.).
The Tories’ incumbent transport minister, Lisa Raitt, held her southern Ontario riding of Milton; the party’s incumbent minister for international trade, Ed Fast, also hung onto his B.C. riding of Abbotsford.
NDP critics out
Monday’s election also cost the federal New Democrats their lead agriculture critic. Malcolm Allen, who had represented the Niagara-area riding of Welland since 2008, lost in the redrawn riding of Niagara Centre by over 2,300 votes against Liberal contender Vance Badawey.
Pat Martin, the veteran NDP MP for Winnipeg Centre since 1997, who served as critic (2011-13) and assistant/associate critic (2007-11) for the Canadian Wheat Board, was also unseated, losing by a spread of almost 9,000 votes against Liberal contender Robert-Falcon Ouelette.
The NDP’s remaining caucus, while light on experience in the agriculture file, still includes its incumbent deputy ag critic. Ruth Ellen Brosseau, who won the riding of Berthier-Maskinonge as a rookie for the NDP in 2011, held the riding Monday night by almost 9,000 votes over Bloc Quebecois contender Yves Perron.
Don Davies, the NDP’s critic for international trade, hung onto his riding of Vancouver-Kingsway on Monday night; the party’s transport critic, Toronto MP Olivia Chow, lost her riding of Spadina-Fort York to Liberal contender Adam Vaughan.
The Bloc Quebecois, while also light on ag experience in its slightly larger new caucus of 10 MPs, still includes veteran Louis Plamondon, a former Progressive Conservative MP who helped found the Bloc in 1991 and served as its ag critic briefly in 2004.
Plamondon, who sat on the Commons standing ag committee for the Tories (1984-86) and again for the Bloc from 2002 to 2004, easily held his riding of Becancour-Nicolet-Saurel against Liberal contender Claude Carpentier by a spread of over 8,000 votes. — AGCanada.com Network
 
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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with politics agriculture parliament election | More articles by Eric Anderson


Researchers tout 'smart' fertilizer - Chemical coating 'reads' the signals from plants and releases nutrients

Posted by Eric Anderson Sep 28, 2015

26 Sep 2015
Ottawa Citizen
TOM SPEARS

 

Researchers tout 'smart' fertilizer

Chemical coating 'reads' the signals from plants and releases nutrients

She never planned to study fertilizers. Maria DeRosa, a chemistry professor raised in Ottawa, dreamed of designing drugs that deliver themselves directly to targets inside the human body.

Maria DeRosa in her lab at Carleton U holds a handful of soil.

A decade later she is proudly showing off the results that came when a colleague persuaded her to take a sharp turn, and to deliver "smart" fertilizers to farm crops instead.

DeRosa, from Carleton University, and Carlos Monreal of Agriculture Canada, have designed a way to make fertilizer release its nutrients when crops need them, and lock them up tight when crops don't need feeding. This prevents fertilizer from washing away unused and polluting lakes and rivers.

And the clue to it all was realizing that plants send out signals into the soil, and that DeRosa and Monreal could eavesdrop on them.

The soil under a wheat or canola field is a complex place.

"The soil has microbes and all sort of things going on that are living there," DeRosa said. For instance, a whole community of tiny fungi and bacteria interact with plant roots to help the plant absorb nutrients.

And when wheat or canola need nitrogen, they release chemicals that appear to be a sort of signal — possibly to the soil microbes, telling them to deliver the plant food.

Monreal says ordinary soil contains millions of organisms — bacteria, viruses, insects, worms, fungi — all interacting in a complex world that we don't yet understand. Some of them help plants absorb nutrients.

"We have the Hubble Telescope and we're all the time looking at the stars and galaxies. We're very good at that," he said. "But we invest so little to study what is under our feet, because it's hidden and we don't think about it."

Still, the signal was a clue to feeding plants when they need it most.

Monreal and DeRosa gave the fertilizer a chemical coating. This is the part that qualifies as a smart fertilizer: Chemicals in the coating, called aptamers, react to the "feed me" signal from wheat and canola, and they make the coating break down. This releases the plant food when the plants need it.

It can be adapted for microscopic fertilizer particles or for much larger ones.

It's estimated that farmers in Canada lose $1 billion a year in fertilizer that never reaches the crops, DeRosa said.

"I didn't even realize (at first) that this was a problem."

Yet when fertilizer washes into a body of water, it stimulates the growth of weeds and algae blooms.

At Agriculture Canada in Ottawa, Monreal is studying the signals that comes from plants, hoping to find out how many kinds there are. There's a lot still to learn.

What about home garden applications?

"Sure, tomatoes! Everyone wants to know," DeRosa said. So far, the research is just on grains, which use fertilizers on a much bigger scale. But she advises that patience will pay off for gardeners eventually.

"The mechanism should be the same."

The technique hasn't been commercialized yet, but the pair have been working with industrial partners along the way, and expect patenting and commercial production will follow.

"At the beginning this was science fiction and now we're starting to say: 'Hey, this could actually work'."

But she is also excited to think that the lessons from a wheat field could lead to drug delivery and more uses of smart chemicals, such as delivering a drug to a cancer cell and not to a healthy cell.

"From a science point of view the applications are so broad."


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Posted in New Products | Tagged with fertiliser agriculture research smart fertiliser | More articles by Eric Anderson


Saskatchewan announces new agriculture drainage regulations

Posted by Eric Anderson Sep 01, 2015

PROVINCE ANNOUNCES NEW AGRICULTURE DRAINAGE REGULATIONS

 

Released on September 1, 2015

First Phase in the Development of an Agricultural Water Management Strategy

Today, Minister responsible for the Water Security Agency Herb Cox announced new drainage regulations in Saskatchewan. The new regulations are the first phase of an agricultural water management strategy that recognizes the benefits of drainage and the importance of mitigating negative impacts.

“We recognize drainage is an important water management tool for producers and these new regulations will help us streamline the approval process to help producers become compliant while mitigating damage downstream,” Cox said. “These new regulations are part of the development of a risk based agricultural water management strategy that will improve the overall process, including applications and investigating complaints, and will help prevent future issues.”

The key changes in the new regulations are:

  •    ensuring that impacts related to flooding, water quality and habitat loss are addressed as part of the drainage works approval process;
  •    allowing landowner agreements as evidence of land control;
  •    simplifying and streamlining the application approval process;
  •    no longer exempting works constructed before 1981 from requiring an approval; and
  •    enabling the use of “qualified persons” in the design of higher risk drainage works.

These drainage regulations fulfill a commitment made in the 2014 Speech from the Throne. This is the first significant change to drainage regulations in 35 years.

The new drainage regulations were created after extensive online and industry stakeholder consultations. More than 500 public participants and 15 industry and environmental groups provided input into the creation of the new approach to drainage in Saskatchewan.

The new regulations are the first step in a phased-in approach to bring all drainage in the province into compliance over the next 10 years. These changes facilitate the start of the overall approach to the agricultural water management strategy.

The next phase of the agricultural water management strategy will be the development and refining of policies and program delivery which will be used in a series of pilot projects and then expanded to the rest of the province.

The pilot projects are based in the Souris Basin near Stoughton and the Assiniboine Basin near Canora. Local producers, watershed authorities and representatives in those areas have committed to working with the WSA to implement the new agricultural water management strategy and to help bring existing drainage projects into compliance.

The WSA will continue working with stakeholders on this strategy to develop policies on mitigation, application processes and informational materials.

“Drainage is one of the major issues facing rural Saskatchewan so we are pleased that the government is implementing regulations meant to address deficiencies with the current system,” Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities President Ray Orb said. “We have been awaiting this announcement and look forward to working with the government on the implementation of these regulations and further refinement of the agriculture water management strategy as it is phased in over the next few years.”


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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with Saskatchewan drainage water management | More articles by Eric Anderson


Used Grain Bag Roller - Government Rebate up to $5000

Posted by Eric Anderson Jul 30, 2015

The Government of Saskatchewan has published that . . . .

Plastic Grain Bag Roller BMP

Intent of BMP:

Removing grain from grain bags often occurs during the winter months when snow and ice buildup can make it difficult to remove the bag from the field. Having access to a grain bag roller as the grain is extracted makes consolidation and recycling of the plastic easier and more convenient. The plastic also remains cleaner if immediately rolled which is preferred by the recycling industry. Recycling is an environmentally preferred alternative to burning, burying or taking bags to landfill sites. 

This BMP will assist producers with the purchase of a grain bag roller. The intent of the BMP is to better manage, store and recycle grain bags thereby reducing the environmental risks associated with improper disposal.

Funding Level:

50 per cent of eligible costs to a maximum of $5,000.

Application Type:

Rebate

Technical Resource:

For more information on this BMP, please contact Financial Programs Branch at 1-877-874-53651-877-874-5365

For information about grain bag recycling programs please contact SimplyAg Solutions Inc. at 1-866-298-71-866-298-7222

Eligibility:

Project Costs:

Eligible Costs:

  • Plastic grain bag stand-alone roller unit.
  • Incorporated roller unit in a grain extractor if it produces a roll acceptable to recycle.
  • Hydraulic components to connect to the tractor hydraulic system if not part of the roller system.

Ineligible Costs:

  • Costs for projects started prior to April 1, 2015. 
  • A trailer to haul the stand-alone roller unit.
  • Equipment for loading or hauling used plastic.
  • Labour including applicant, employee or custom.
  • In-kind labour costs to assemble equipment.
  • Power units not built into the roller unit.
  • Transportation of the roller unit from the dealership to the farm.
  • Used or leased items or equipment. To be eligible, new items or equipment must be purchased from a grain bag dealer or manufacturer.
 

 

Article from http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/Plastic-Grain-Bag-Roller-BMP

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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with grain bag roller Saskatchewan | More articles by Eric Anderson


$8.5M funding to help boost wheat crops

Posted by Eric Anderson Jul 22, 2015

 

A U of S crop scientist expects $8.5 million in genomics research funding will help prairie farmers grow better, more efficient wheat crops.

Curtis Pozniak, who grew up near Rama in east-central Saskatchewan, will spend the next four years researching genomic tools to support wheat breeding after winning a national large-scale applied research project competition, Genomics and Feeding the Future.

Pozniak and the National Research Council’s Andrew Sharpe designed one of three U of S-based projects to receive funding from the competition, which is designed to address the increased demand for food caused by climate change and a growing global population.


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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with wheat ag research | More articles by Eric Anderson


Canola exports to South Korea up 171%

Posted by Eric Anderson Jul 21, 2015

The Vancouver Sun is reporting that . . .

Seven months after Canada’s first free-trade agreement with an Asian country went into effect, the deal is already boosting the first group of Canadian goods that had their South Korean import tariffs removed, officials said.

Trade officials said figures showing Canada accumulating a trade deficit with South Korea during the first months of the free-trade deal are misleading, since the figures included coal, where the demand has softened.

In a recent interview, Lee Kie Cheon, consul-general for South Korea in Vancouver, said the deal’s benefits for Canadian businesses and the economy can already be seen in a number of sectors. Among the commodities already recording gains: Canadian exports of canola (up 171 per cent in the first six months of this year), frozen pork (up 40 per cent up to May), and B.C. seafood (up 133 per cent from January to April).

The Canada-South Korea free-trade agreement went into effect on Jan. 1.

 

Full story at The Vancouver Sun, JUly 20, 2015, Page A11


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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with canola south korea free trade agreement | More articles by Eric Anderson


Trade 'balancing' act in focus at ag ministers' meeting

Posted by Eric Anderson Jul 20, 2015

CNS is reporting that  . . .

With foreign governments urging Canada to open up its protected dairy, poultry and egg markets, the country’s provincial agriculture ministers are unanimously counter-urging in supply management’s defense.

Pressure from trading partners and strong regional support in principle for supply management are nothing new. But Canada’s annual ag ministers’ meeting, held this week in Charlottetown, wrapped ahead of international talks starting later next week on the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The TPP, a proposed 12-nation Pacific Rim trade deal, includes not only Canada but major dairy and poultry exporting nations such as the U.S. and New Zealand. Negotiators are to meet July 24-27 in Maui, followed by a ministerial meeting July 28-31.

Canada also faces domestic pressure to stay at the TPP negotiating table, from beef, pork and grain producers aiming not just to expand but to preserve their access to TPP markets such as Japan.


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Posted in Farm related news | Tagged with ag trade politics | More articles by Eric Anderson


Benefits of Buying a Meridian Bin

Posted by Flaman Jan 28, 2015

As an Ag Sales Representative for Flaman, it seems natural to launch my blog with something I have grown up with.  It’s something I truly have a passion for, and hopefully something that will give some insight into your decision making process when buying a Meridian bin.
 
I started my young career working for Meridian Manufacturing- then known as Wheatland Bins - in the welding shop pushing a broom, then I moved to the wash bay, and eventually to powder coating and finishing a completed bin.
 
Following that, my crew and I ventured out on our own building corrugated bins across Alberta.  Today when I discuss grain and fertilizer storage needs with prospective customers, I find I have a unique perspective both in smooth walled and corrugated bins as well as 8complete storage systems.
 
So what are the benefits of buying a Meridian Bin? Let’s begin with the question of choosing a smooth skin over a corrugated line.
 
Let’s face it, there are many corrugated bins to choose from; Twister, Westeel, Behlen, Gobal, the list goes on and on. The main line of thinking is that Meridian is the more expensive option, and choosing a corrugated line will save money. Although this may be true, the real savings with corrugated bins come when you get into much larger scale flat bottom bins. The small increase in price when moving to a Meridian can easily be offset when thinking about its benefits.
 
1)   Customer Service – Ready to use upon delivery
2)   Durability - All weather eco-friendly powder coat finish
3)   Resale – heavy duty no compromise quality that can be moved
4)   Value – inspected, exceeding industry standards
5)   Peace of Mind – saving time and money
 
Now that I have you thinking about Meridian Bins specifically- here are a few things to consider when purchasing the right bin for you.
 
1)   How much more storage you are hoping to gain?
Meridian carries a variety of sizes of smooth wall bins. From 6’ diameter feed bins all the way to 18’ diameter fertilizer and grain storage.
Typically for transportation purposes, a 16’ diameter bin is used and can get you up to 6000 bushels of storage.
2)   How long is your loading auger? This will determine your overall height of bin
If you’re not in the market to buy a new auger with your bin purchase, you will want to make sure your current one is up to the task. Below is a simple chart.
Grain Max
Multipurpose
Total Height
Auger Length
2300
1412
27’
46’
3000
1615
29’
51’
4000
1620
34’
61’
5000
1625
39’
71’
6000
1630
41’
71’
 
3)   What kind of product do you want to store?
If you are looking for an easy solution for grain storage only, the grain max series provides you with convenient no hang up storage. If you are wanting to have the option to store both fertilizer and grain, a multipurpose bin will suit your needs.
Liquid storage, as well as HD storage for cement or sand are also an option through the Meridian commercial division.
4)   What options can I bundle with my new bin?
Flaman can provide you with all the necessary options to go along with your new grain bin. Aeration fans, rockets, as well as temperature and moisture cables are great additions to protect your investment and give you peace of mind.
 
Beyond these advantages comes further benefits and savings. Consider the money you can save by purchasing a fertilizer bin this year.
 
If you are able to buy your Fertilizer- let’s take ammonia at *$570 in a low season in your new Meridian 1625 bin. Then in high season the price jumps to $670 per ton. You’re saving $100 per ton, and are able to take as much as 165 tonnes. $16,500. In exactly one purchase you have paid almost paid for your bin.
Later during harvest, you have the ability to store excess grain, throw in an aeration tube, even carefully control and maintain temperature throughout the storage season. The complete system all taken care of by your local provider, Flaman.
 

*http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/statistics-and-market-information/by-product-sector/crops/crops-market-information-canadian-industry/market-outlook-report/canadian-farm-fuel-and-fertilizer-prices-and-expenses-july-2013/?id=1 


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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with Meridian bins Flaman ag sales customer service durability reasale | More articles by Flaman


Flaman Dragon Slayers Rip Up the River!

Posted by Flaman Aug 22, 2014

I’m going to be honest, before this year, I had never really heard of the sport of Dragon Boating. But after competing in the Edmonton Dragon Boat Festival this year, I wonder how I’d gone this long not knowing.
 
Dragon Boating is very much a team sport that requires commitment and comradery. Our Flaman team was called the Flaman Dragon Slayers and we started practicing in May as soon as the weather was warm enough. I was one of the eight first-timers in the boat this year, but that didn’t slow us down. All the veteran paddlers took us newbies under their wings and patiently showed us proper technique and timing. By the time the festival rolled around, I felt pretty confident.
 
However, that confidence was short lived come race day. It’s not that I wasn’t confident in our team, but the nerves that I had coursing through my body made me start to doubt myself. I had a giant knot in my stomach all morning. When we were sitting in the boat for the first race waiting for them to blow the start horn, I thought I was going to pass out. We were told to focus and keep our head in the boat. Ignore all the distractions; the crowd, the other boat and birds flying overhead. Just focus on your breathing. Listen for the commands. Wait…wait….and beep!
 
Once that horn blew, the 2:05 that it took us to finish, and win, the race went by so fast! It was over before I knew it. I will never forget that “high” from the first race. We may have only won our first race, but we set the 6th fastest time in the festival! We were in equal competition with some of the best teams in the city and other parts of Alberta. Each race we competed in gave me a huge surge of adrenaline and it stayed with me for the rest of the day.
 
We ended up finishing 6th overall, which is awesome for my first year. There was only one downside to the races, and that was the fact that they put a ramp and about 20 stairs at the end of the race that you have to climb up. The reason this sucks is because after the race, your body does not want to go up a ramp or stairs. All it wants to do is collapse with exhaustion. But, along the ramp there were tons of people congratulating and high fiving us on the way up, so that made the climb a little easier.
 
Everyone at the festival was so supportive of one another. There were congratulations and cheers after each race. This was another thing that made my experience so enjoyable.
 
I’m looking forward to paddling next year. I’ll be that much more skilled and know what to expect. If you ever get the opportunity to try Dragon Boating, or any new sport for that matter, I recommend trying it. Try something new. You’ll be glad you did. I’m glad I did J
 
“If you don’t do it this year, you’ll be one year older when you do.”- Warren Miller

    


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Posted in Local News | Tagged with dragon boating Flaman Dragon Slayers Edmonton Dragon Boating Festival 2014 Rip up the River paddling | More articles by Flaman


Why built in Canada still matters

Posted by Steve Whittington Jul 25, 2014

Trailtech TD 210It was a Friday.  I was at our Nisku location and I was leaving the dealership walking through the lot headed home for the weekend. I walked past a Trailtech TD 210 that had a few  modified options on it. I looked the trailer over as I always do when walk past any unit in our yard. As I walked along the length of the unit from taillights to hitch I noted the features, fit and finish, quality of build, overall appearance, etc, etc, etc…when I reached the hitch  I saw this trailer had just gone through our pre-delivery inspection process (as the sticker slapped on the front of the gooseneck indicated).  I then stopped and looked back down the length of the trailer.

“This is a damn fine trailer”  I thought to myself.  So  I took a closer look at the welds and the convenience features on the unit (some installed by us).  I started to really critic the unit looking at the decking for cracks and other imperfections; I looked under the frame at the paint coverage; I followed the wiring harness (note I wrote wiring harness not strand wiring) along the frame paying attention to how it was secured and protected.  Everything on this trailer was perfect. No matter how hard I looked I could not find any problems with the trailer.  Quite honestly, this is not an exception to the rule, it is the rule: Trailtech product has outstanding consistent quality. 

Call me bias (Trailtech is Canadian built, and a brand FGC has a longstanding history with) but I believe the quality that goes into to trailers built in Canada, for Canadian conditions is underappreciated. To address this I decided to give you reasons as a Canadian consumer why you should buy a Canadian built Trailtech.

1)      Quality of Build.  As in many products there are a good, better and best for light industrial trailers. At Flaman Group of Companies  we sell products that fit into all three categories in order to meet the various needs of various customers.  These categories are differentiated by features and quality which ultimately means different pricing.  Trailtech as a brand offers a good, better and best  models for each category. Where I believe they really shine (and customers have been voting this way with their dollars) is in the best category.  The Premier and Industrial series generally have no equal in the market place.  If you need a reliable trailer as a tool for your business, to me it makes sense to invest in a Trailtech that will always do what you need and last the test of time.

2)      Canadian weather and road conditions. They are awful, both our roads and our weather and many trailer brands are built for the warm flat highways of the southern states as opposed to the gravel and pitted frozen highways of the Canadian north.  For these conditions you need paint that can absorb some of the mechanical impact of road rocks at -40 and a RV plug that will not shatter when you fight to plug it into your tow vehicle.   Trailtech based in Gravelburg SK lives in and understands these conditions.  A Trailtech trailer is made to deal with this weather without fuss.

3)      Warranty: We sell thousands of Trailtech products every year.  They get horribly abused by some customers (another story) and yet we rarely hear of any issues. That said no company is perfect.  The product is built by people and people make mistakes (as we all do).  What defines a product and company is what they do when that happens. It has been my experience that between Trailtech and Flaman when a mistake happens that affects the customer,  the Trailtech and Flaman people always make it right.

Lastly Americans market buy American all the time to support American companies and American workers. Let me be shameless and proudly yell the same thing: Buy Canadian!  Yes I am a hypocrite as we sell many American brands across many of our divisions( including the Trailer Division).  Being a leader in retail we need to provide the leading products in their appropriate categories in order to provide the best customer experience to our customers. That said, there are Canadian products that we sell that are the best in their categories (Trailtech is one of them)…Buy Canadian and support Canadians.

 So if you are in the market for your first trailer or are adding one to your fleet. Think about Canadian quality.  Quality comes with a cost but I believe it is worth it.

Trailtech TD 210 custom option

 


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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with Trailtech Flatdeck Canadian built Trailers dump trailers ag transport | More articles by Steve Whittington


B & B Podcast

Posted by Steve Whittington Jun 03, 2014

Southland TrailersJim Behnke from Behnke Enterprises talks to Steve about Ag Transports and changes he has seen in his 27 year career in the Trailer Industry. Behnke Enterprises is a truly world class and worldwide brand with distribution in many countries and continents. Behnke Enterprises manufacturers a diverse product line of Ag Transport equipment and industrial trailers that allows evolving. Listen, learn, and enjoy the podcast.


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Posted in Podcasts | Tagged with Podcast Flaman Trailers Steve Whittington Behnke Enterprises Ag Transport Industrial Trailers | More articles by Steve Whittington


Bin Sense: Secure Your Harvest

Posted by Flaman May 09, 2014

We all know, in order to prevent grain spoilage, you must keep it at the proper temperature and keep the moisture level low. Millions of dollars are lost every year due to grain spoilage. Intra Grain has a solution to this issue and it is called Bin Sense. Bin Sense monitors your grain 24/7 and, every hour, can wirelessly send you an update on the condition of your grain. This takes the guesswork and risk out of grain storage. Bin Sense not only monitors moisture levels but monitors grain levels as well within the bin so that if theft occurs, you will be notified.
 
The whole Bin Sense Monitoring system is easy to install and even easier to operate. It uses a magnetic mount at the top of your bin, which makes set up/removal simple. Each unit has been highly tested and does not require the use of a power source because it is entirely solar powered with a backup battery. No struggling with extension cords or generators.
 

On Intra Grain’s website, you are able to request a quote and read more about the products and technology. Check it out http://intragrain.com


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Posted in New Products | Tagged with bin sense intragrain grain monitoring wireless | More articles by Flaman


Truck Boss Podcast

Posted by Steve Whittington Aug 19, 2013

Southland TrailersAidan Thygessen and Kent Natrass, joined me on a call to explain truck decks, the evolution of truck decks and how the Marathon Truckboss is the pinnacle of that evolution. Marathon has been building Truck Decks for 17 years there have been a lot of changes along the way. Today the Truckboss is much more than just a truck deck, have a listen and learn why the truck boss is shipped and used all over the world.


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Posted in Podcasts | Tagged with Trailer Talk Podcast Truck Boss Aidan Thygessen Kent Natrass Marathon sled deck sleddeck truck deck truckdeck truck cargo management system | More articles by Steve Whittington


A Flaman Pro Grain Bagger? Yes Please!

Posted by Mark Flaman Aug 15, 2013

The reasons for purchasing a grain bagger are obvious. If you're still hung up on the decision, I'll try and make it a little easier for you.

There has been quite a large shift over the past few years with farmers not being able to store all of the grain they yield in bins due to a really great harvest, so we're stuck with this problem. We need more storage, the grain bins are full, and the bin crews can't get out to the yard or it is impossible to even acquire more bins. The simple solution? Chuck the commodity in a giant plastic bag where it is not affected by weather or moisture changes, right in the same field it was harvested from. With the cost of grain bags dropping (0.6c / bushel) it's becoming much more mainstream, and I think we can expect to see more and more bags in the field as time goes on.

There are a couple more main reasons for bagging. If you've got combines in different fields during a great year for harvest such as 2013, chances are you're going to be running trucks full time and putting wear on them just to keep up with the combines and getting the commodity into the bins. With a grain bagger, you can just drive over to the bagger in the same field with the grain cart or combine, unload into the bagger, and it'll sit there until you either have bin storage available to dry the grain, or until you'd like to haul it to the terminal. Remember that these grain bags don't fluctuate in moisture content, whatever you put in will come out the same way.

If bin storage space is an issue, we see a lot of our customers using grain rings with tarps, but they let in moisture and whatever grain is sitting on the ground is sure to spoil at some point. You can keep the grain in a bag for even two years, and be able to pull it out and haul it away.

All in all, the way we're farming changes every year, and bagging grain is something that is becoming extremely common. We carry the Flaman Pro Grain Bagger at all of our mainline locations, and the bags to go with them as well. Need the extractor to take the grain out? We sell those too, both new and refurbished. For more information and specifications of the Flaman Pro Grain Bagger, please visit www.Flaman.com.

 


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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with grain bagger grain bags bag bagger flaman flaman pro grain bagger agriculture grain storage alternative bin storage | More articles by Mark Flaman


Choosing Between an Auger and Conveyor

Posted by Mark Flaman Jul 25, 2013

There are a lot of reasons why you should choose a conveyor over an auger or vice versa, but I'll make it a little easier for you to figure out exactly which product will best suit you.

One of the biggest factors in someone purchasing brand new for the first time will be the cost. Conveyors are quite a bit more expensive than augers, but tend to last two to three times longer overall than an auger. The flighting on an auger would have to be replaced before it has put through one million bushels, where we've seen the belting on a conveyor last three to four million bushels.  

You can also get away with a shorter auger for the size of bin you're loading into, as the unloading angle is a lot higher on an auger, versus having the grain fall back down the conveyor belt once it reaches a certain angle. The motor on a conveyor is positioned higher up on top of its tube, to avoid the interaction with chaff, and requires less horsepower than an auger. 

The last big thing that you may be concerned about is what kinds of commodities compliment the auger or conveyor. A conveyor will be more gentle and avoid cracking on pulse crops such as peas and lentils, but canola and other oil seeds are not recommended because the oil deteriorates the belt and gets gummed inside the conveyor. Augers, however, love oil seeds, as they almost lubricate the machine, leading to a much longer auger lifespan. 

Now that you've got all your information, give us a call for some pricing or check out our selections of augers here and conveyors here.

This handy infographic can help you decide whether an auger or a conveyor is best suited for your operation.

Choosing between an auger and a conveyor

 Download this infographic

 


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Posted in Product Information | Tagged with choosing auger conveyor agriculture bushels | More articles by Mark Flaman


Medicine Hat celebrates its Grand Opening

Posted by Adam Diakow May 17, 2013

On Wednesday May 8 Flaman Group of Companies in Medicine Hat held its grand opening to celebrate its new, larger location. We couldn’t have asked for a better day weather-wise, although this meant that most farmers were in the field and unable to attend.

We held a free BBQ lunch and had a great turn out. The official ribbon cutting was done at 12:30 p.m. by the Medicine Hat Chamber of Commerce and also in attendance was the mayor of Medicine Hat Norm Boucher.

To top off the day the Frank Flaman Foundation donated $7,000 to the Medicine Hat Women’s Shelter, which is the largest donation they had received to date.

The day couldn’t have gone better for everyone. Thanks to everyone who attended.

For more photos of the event, please visit our Facebook page here


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Posted in Local News | Tagged with new store trailers fitness agriculture rentals Medicine Hat grand opening | More articles by Adam Diakow


Flaman Rentals introduces new Damage Waiver Fee

Posted by Flaman Apr 19, 2013

As of May 1, 2013, all Flaman Rentals stores and agriculture rental dealers across the prairies will be introducing a new damage waiver fee for all of our equipment rental customers. This new fee is designed to help our customers offset the high cost of equipment repairs if they accidentally damage any rental equipment while in their possession.

By paying this small fee, our customers can now feel good knowing they have coverage for any accidental damage to tools or equipment they rent from Flaman. This coverage could save them hundreds of dollars in repairs.

It’s just one more way Flaman is helping our customers have a positive rental experience, knowing that those expensive pieces of rental equipment are covered while in their possession.

Please stop in or call your nearest Flaman rental store for full details.

Flaman Rentals in Moosomin, Yorkton and Swan River currently offer a similar fee and this will remain unchanged.


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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with Flaman Rentals rental renting equipment trailers damage waiver fee protection | More articles by Flaman


New Medicine Hat store

Posted by Adam Diakow Mar 13, 2013

We’ve been busy these past couple of weeks getting everything moved into our new home at 3377 Gershaw Drive SW. We’re now located at the former Big Wheels dealership off of Highway 3, just half a kilometer south of the airport.

This new, larger location will let us serve our customers better. We will now be offering a service department and a larger rental area. We can carry a larger selection of products, plus we’re in an easy to find location. Whether you need a trailer, agriculture equipment or fitness equipment, Flaman Sales is your one stop shop!  Come check out the trailers we have on special!
 
I invite you to stop by the new store to say hello! We’re looking forward to meeting some new customers and also continuing to serve those of you who previously shopped at Big Wheels. At Flaman Sales, customer service is one of our main goals and we feel this new location will better meet the needs of the community.
 
Our Grand Opening will be May 8th! Stay tuned for more details soon.
 
Here is the new store's location.
 
Medicine Hat store

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Posted in Local News | Tagged with new store new location trailers fitness agriculture rentals Flaman Medicine Hat | More articles by Adam Diakow


Voting has started for Stuck in the Muck!

Posted by Jennifer Thompson Oct 03, 2012

It's that time of year again! It's time to vote for your favourite photos on Stuck in the Muck!

We had some great pictures submitted this year, and we need your help to pick the winners. Visit www.stuckinthemuck.com every day to vote for the best stuck photo. The winners will get a brand new tow rope to help them out next year.

At Flaman Group of Companies, it's important to us to give back to our customers and the farming community. That's one of the reasons why we started this fun photo contest. We're thankful for your support of the contest over the years. I hope you'll enjoy looking at and voting for this year's group of photos.

You can vote once a day for your favourite photos, so visit the website often! Winners will be announced at the beginning of November.

Good luck to all who entered!


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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with stuck in the muck stuck mud photo contest Flaman agriculture tractors farm | More articles by Jennifer Thompson


Third Time's A Charm

Posted by Jennifer Thompson Jun 26, 2012

For the third year in a row, Flaman Rentals in Saskatoon has been named a Consumer Choice Award Winner. This division of Flaman rents out enclosed and flat deck trailers, along with agricultural equipment like discs, land rollers or mowers.

I recently attended the Consumer Choice Award ceremony with our marketing VP Steve Whittington at the beautiful Delta Bessborough in Saskatoon. We got to sip champagne and rub elbows with a lot of great business owners in the city, and of course, celebrate our own success!

This award is special because the winners are picked by our customers. It means a lot to us that people recognize our efforts to offer great customer service. We were also very pleased to win a Consumer Choice Award three years in a row. This means our team is consistent taking care of our customers’ needs. And we’re proud of that!

What’s great is that the Consumer Choice Award is becoming a trusted name in the Saskatoon area. Looking at the other winners gathered in the room that night, we knew we were in good company amongst other top businesses in Saskatoon.

A big “thank you!” is due to our rental team in Saskatoon for all their efforts and hard work every day and to our customers for continuing to choose Flaman Rentals.

Steve Whittington (middle) receiving our award from Saskatoon Mayor Don Atchison and Consumer Choice Award President Marcel Sbrollini
Jennifer Thompson arriving at the awards ceremony.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with Consumer Choice Award Flaman Rentals trailer rentals agricultural equipment rentals customer service Saskatoon | More articles by Jennifer Thompson


New Rental flyer is out now

Posted by Flaman Mar 30, 2012

Flaman Rentals has just finished producing and distributing the new Rental Rate Flyer for our eastern Saskatchewan and western Manitoba rental stores. It contains details and safety information as well as rental rates on all of our most popular equipment.

A mass mailing was done in early March to farmers and business in these areas and it is also available to download off this site.
 
We hope that you will find it useful and informative and like the catalogue says, if you don’t see what you need in here, please call any of our branches and we will be glad to help find it for you. Our rental inventory is constantly being added to so that we can better serve the needs of our customers and their diverse markets.
 
When you think rentals, think Flaman!

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New website, new dealers for summer 2011

Posted by Barrett Prokopie Jul 05, 2011

This spring has been a very different one for many producers in the prairies, from near disastrous flooding in the southern parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba, to drought in northern Alberta and B.C. It seems that nothing is predictable in the agricultural sector anymore (if it ever was).

One thing is certain for all producers, in all provinces: we need all the help we can get. That is why Flaman Rentals has once again expanded our network of dealers, as well as the large line of products carried.
 
In Saskatchewan we’d like to welcome our newest dealers: B & A Petroleum, having enjoyed great success in their Maple Creek location, has now expanded into Assiniboia. In Blaine Lake you can now go to Blair Industrial and see Blair for all your rental needs and last but not least…. Andres Inc is now our newest dealer in Windthorst.
 
In Alberta we’re happy to announce these dealers to serve you better: visit Brian Headon of Headon Rentals in the Lloydminster and surrounding trading area, Dunvegan Fab and Welding in the Fairview area and Whitetail Ventures in the High Level and La Crete areas.
 
And what better way to mark this expansion then to introduce our new Flaman Rentals website. Please take some time to navigate the site and see what we have to offer. We think you’ll find it very user-friendly and informative. And check out the Flaman Rental dealer closest to you!

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Posted in Division News | Tagged with rentals new website dealers ag equipment trailers Saskatchewan Alberta | More articles by Barrett Prokopie


Customer Appreciation Event in Prince Albert

Posted by Jennifer Thompson Jun 20, 2011

Are you interested in the next generation of farm processes and grain management? Want to win some prizes?

Then stop by Flaman Sales in Prince Albert on Tuesday June 28 for a day of exciting product demonstrations. You can see the Flaman Pro Grain Bagger and Pro Grain Extractor in action, and learn all about J&M Grain Carts. It will be fun and educational!
 
This is all part of Flaman Sales’ Customer Appreciation Open House, which will be showcasing many other agriculture products such as Opi grain monitoring, bin aeration solutions and a Kioti tractor obstacle course. There will also be raffles and great prizes available to be won, plus burgers and refreshments! All proceeds from food sales will go to the Prince Albert Women’s Shelter. A special donation will also be made to the shelter from the Frank Flaman Foundation.
 
“Flaman Sales wanted to show our customers how much we appreciate them with a day of demos, food and fun,” says Barrett Prokopie, Operations Manager at the Prince Albert store. “This is truly a way to showcase our products and spectacular staff, and get the producers out to discuss their wants and needs, and play our part in the community.”
 
Flaman Sales will have suppliers, product specialists and leasing representatives on hand to answer any questions producers may have and to lend a helping hand. So come on down for a good time!
 

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged with Flaman agriculture equipment demonstrations prizes charity BBQ grain bagger J&M Carts | More articles by Jennifer Thompson


New store in Moosomin, SK

Posted by Flaman Apr 12, 2011

We are excited that as of April 1 Flaman Group of Companies took ownership of Wayne’s Rental Centre in Moosomin. The Moosomin store will be expanded into a full size yard site like Flaman Sales in Yorkton, and will sell a full line of ag implements and equipment—such as bins, aeration fans, grain carts and grain augers—and will include a store with a full retail area, fitness equipment, service bays and a rental area. The store will be managed locally by Peter Nabholz and the general manager will be Tyson Becker who works out of the Yorkton store. There will be a close relationship between the Yorkton, Swan River and Moosomin locations so if an item is not available in Moosomin we can bring it in from Yorkton or Swan River.

L-R: Peter Nabholz, Charlene Swanton, Darren Kindlein, Wayne Beckett and Randy Fyke

The Moosomin location is currently looking to buy about 12 acres of land to build a new store on and be in the new location by 2013. Until then the store will operate out of the former Wayne’s Rental Centre. Almost a million dollars of rental equipment, trailers, water fittings, pumps and water tanks will be added to inventory.

The Yorkton store started 15 years ago with just one employee and has evolved into a store with 25 employees. We can see the same thing happening in Moosomin.

Moosomin is a very strong community and a good fit for the Flaman Group. We have a lot of customers in the Moosomin area that have supported us over the years and we felt a need to be there to look after and serve them better.

Wayne Beckett decided to sell to Flaman Group as he sees us as a well-run company that values its employees and customers. As a family-run company, the Flaman Group looks after its staff and places a lot of importance on being a part of each community it’s in. In the future the Moosomin store hopes to work with local charities as Flaman’s philosophy is to give back to the community as much as we can.

 

If you are in the Moosomin area stop in, say hi and see what our new store has to offer.

 


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Posted in Local News | Tagged with new store Moosomin Flaman agriculture trailers fitness store opening | More articles by Flaman


Funding available for flood prevention measures

Posted by Jennifer Thompson Mar 07, 2011

Residents in southern and central Saskatchewan could face severe flooding this spring if unfavourable weather conditions continue.

According to a report from the Saskatchewan Watershed Authority, there is potential for above normal spring runoff throughout the southern part of the province, as well as the central area bounded by Kindersley, Saskatoon, Prince Albert and North Battleford and a large portion of the eastern agricultural area. This high runoff is linked to excessive rainfall last year and an above average snowpack.

“Above normal precipitation and/or rapid snow melt will increase the threat of high runoff and risk of flooding,” states the report. “Even with average weather conditions between now and runoff, some localized flooding can be anticipated.”

To help mitigate the potential damage from yet another year of flooding, the Saskatchewan Watershed Authority and the Ministry of Corrections, Public Safety and Policing have created a $22 million Emergency Flood Damage Reduction Program.

Through this program, communities, rural municipalities and farm and country residences can access funding and assistance to implement flood reduction or prevention measures. The program will cover 100 per cent of engineering costs to design flood protection works and cost share a variety of flood protection such as: construction of dykes or berms, pumping, sandbags, material to fill sandbags and equipment rental to fill sandbags.

In anticipation of the needs of many farmers and rural residents this spring, Flaman Sales went looking for products that could help prevent flooding and financial losses at farmyards and homes.

“Flooding is a big concern this year,” says Dave Weightman, Director of Operations for the Flaman Group of Companies. “And being prepared is critical. You can’t start planning for a flood when you see the water coming down the road. We’re here to help our customers and offer them services that, unfortunately, could be in very high demand again this year.”

This year Flaman has a sand bagger to purchase or rent, which easily fills 400 50-lb sandbags in only one hour. The company also carries items like tear-resistant sand bags and water pumps, which can be covered under the funding program.

“I think the Emergency Flood Damage Reduction Program is a great way to offer assistance. With every disaster there is a cost,” says Weightman. “Many municipalities may have a flood plan, but a lot of individual people may not have access to those resources because of demand.”

Please contact your local watershed authority to learn more about the Emergency Flood Damage Reduction Program and how to apply. You can also call their head office at (306) 694-3900 or visit www.swa.ca.


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Posted in New Products | Tagged with Flaman flooding agriculture funding government pumps sand bags Saskatchewan | More articles by Jennifer Thompson